References of "Lepinteur, Anthony 50028645"
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See detailA Natural Experiment on Job Insecurity and Fertility in France
Clark, Andrew UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Review of Economics and Statistics (in press)

Job insecurity can have wide-ranging consequences outside of the labour market. We here argue that it reduces fertility amongst the employed. The 1999 rise in the French Delalande tax, paid by large ... [more ▼]

Job insecurity can have wide-ranging consequences outside of the labour market. We here argue that it reduces fertility amongst the employed. The 1999 rise in the French Delalande tax, paid by large private firms when they laid off workers aged over 50, produced an exogenous rise in job insecurity for younger workers in these firms. A difference-in-differences analysis of French ECHP data reveals that this greater job insecurity for these under-50s significantly reduced their probability of having a new child by 3.7 percentage points (with a 95% confidence interval between 0.7 and 6.6 percentage points). Reduced fertility is only found at the intensive margin: job insecurity reduces family size but not the probability of parenthood itself. Our results also suggest negative selection into parenthood, as this fertility effect does not appear for low-income and less-educated workers. [less ▲]

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See detailLife Satisfaction and the Human Development Index Across the World
Yin, Remi UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL; Clark, Andrew et al

in Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology (in press)

We use annual data on over 150 countries between 2005 and 2018 to look at the relationship between subjective well-being (both cognitive and affective) and the Human Development Index (HDI). The HDI ... [more ▼]

We use annual data on over 150 countries between 2005 and 2018 to look at the relationship between subjective well-being (both cognitive and affective) and the Human Development Index (HDI). The HDI appears to be more closely related to cognitive than affective well-being. We also consider the relationships between the three HDI components (the Income, Health and Education Indices) and well-being, and find that, on average, the Income Index has the strongest predictive power. Importantly, we find that the three HDI components only matter equally in Western and rich countries. Our analysis contributes to the discussion about cultural sensitivity in paradigms of societal development in two ways. We first show that differences in preferences towards development aims exist. Second, we propose a weighting procedure for a culturally-sensitive version of the HDI. [less ▲]

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See detailThe fall in income inequality during COVID-19 in four European countries
Clark, Andrew; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Journal of Economic Inequality (in press)

We here use panel data from the COME-HERE survey to track income inequality during COVID-19 in France, Germany, Italy, and Spain. Relative inequality in equivalent household disposable income among ... [more ▼]

We here use panel data from the COME-HERE survey to track income inequality during COVID-19 in France, Germany, Italy, and Spain. Relative inequality in equivalent household disposable income among individuals changed in a hump-shaped way between January 2020 and January 2021, with an initial rise from January to May 2020 being more than reversed by September 2020. Absolute inequality also fell over this period. Due to the pandemic some households lost more than others, and government compensation schemes were targeted towards the poorest, implying that on average income differences decreased. Generalized Lorenz domination reveals that these distributive changes reduced welfare in Italy. [less ▲]

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See detailBoys don't cry (or do the dishes): Family size and the housework gender gap
Menta, Giorgia UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2021), 186

We here use data from the British Cohort Study (BCS) to link family size to age-16 children’s contribution to household chores and the adult housework gender gap. Assuming that home production is an ... [more ▼]

We here use data from the British Cohort Study (BCS) to link family size to age-16 children’s contribution to household chores and the adult housework gender gap. Assuming that home production is an increasing function of family size and using an instrument to account for the endogeneity of fertility, we show that larger families have a different effect on boys and girls at age 16: girls in large families are significantly more likely to contribute to housework, with no effect for boys. We then show that childhood family size affects the housework gender gap between the cohort members and their partners at age 34. Women who grew up in larger families are more likely to carry out a greater share of household tasks in adulthood, as compared to women from smaller families. In addition, growing up in a large family makes cohort members more likely to sort into households with a wider housework gender gap as adults. We show that the persistent effect of family size is due to the adoption of behaviours in line with traditional gender roles: a lower likelihood of employment and shorter commutes for women, along with a higher employment probability for their partners. [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic Perspectives on Well-Being
Borga, Liyousew UL; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Willems, Helmut Erich; Samuel, Robin; Vögele, Claus (Eds.) et al Well-being and health-related behavior of adolescents. Disciplinary concepts, empirical findings, international perspectives, and practical approaches (working title) (2021)

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See detailIt's a Family Affair: Family Health Shocks and Child Well-Being
Borga, Liyousew UL; d'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Willems, Helmut Erich; Samuel, Robin; Vögele, Claus (Eds.) et al Well-being and health-related behavior of adolescents. Disciplinary concepts, empirical findings, international perspectives, and practical approaches (working title) (2021)

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See detailMoney and Happiness: Income, Wealth and Subjective Well-being
D'Ambrosio, Conchita UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL; Jäntti, Markus

in Social Indicators Research (2020), 148

We examine the complex relationship between money and happiness. We find that both permanent income and wealth are better predictors of life satisfaction than current income and wealth. They matter not ... [more ▼]

We examine the complex relationship between money and happiness. We find that both permanent income and wealth are better predictors of life satisfaction than current income and wealth. They matter not only in absolute terms but also in comparative terms. However, their relative impacts differ. The first exerts a comparison effect – the higher the permanent income of the reference group, the lower life satisfaction – the second exerts an information effect – the higher the permanent wealth of the reference group, the higher life satisfaction. We also show that negative transitory shocks to income reduce life satisfaction while transitory shocks to wealth have no effect. Lastly, we analyse the effects of their components and find that not all of them predict life satisfaction: permanent taxes do not matter, while only the value of permanent real estate, financial and business assets do. Finally, we use quantile regression and analyse to what extent our results vary along the well-being distribution, finding the impacts to be larger at lower levels of life satisfaction. [less ▲]

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See detailChildren's Socio-Emotional Skills: Is there a Quantity-Quality Trade-off?
Briole, Simon; Le Forner, Helene; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Labour Economics (2020)

Although it is widely acknowledged that non-cognitive skills matter for adult outcomes, little is known about the role played by family environment in the formation of these skills. We use a longitudinal ... [more ▼]

Although it is widely acknowledged that non-cognitive skills matter for adult outcomes, little is known about the role played by family environment in the formation of these skills. We use a longitudinal survey of children born in the UK in 2000-2001, the Millennium Cohort Study by the Centre for Longitudinal Studies, to estimate the effect of family size on socio-emotional skills, measured by the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. To account for the endogeneity of fertility decisions, we use a well-known instrumental approach that exploits parents' preference for children's gender diversity. We show that the birth of a third child negatively affects the socio-emotional skills of the first two children in a persistent manner. However, we show that this negative effect is entirely driven by girls. We provide evidence that this gender effect is partly driven by an unequal response of parents' time investment in favour of boys and, to a lesser extent, by an unequal demand for household chores. [less ▲]

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See detailGender Norms, Fairness, and Relative Labor Supply Within Households
Fleche, Sarah; Lepinteur, Anthony UL; Powdthavee, Nick

in Labour Economics (2020)

Using data in the United States, UK and Germany, we show that women whose working hours exceed those of their male partners report lower life satisfaction on average. By contrast, men do not report lower ... [more ▼]

Using data in the United States, UK and Germany, we show that women whose working hours exceed those of their male partners report lower life satisfaction on average. By contrast, men do not report lower life satisfaction from working more hours than their female partners. An analysis of possible mechanisms shows that in couples where the woman works more hours than the man, women do not spend significantly less time doing household chores. Women with egalitarian ideologies are likely to perceive this unequal division of labour as unfair, ultimately reducing their life satisfaction. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Shorter Workweek and Worker Wellbeing: Evidence from Portugal and France
Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Labour Economics (2019)

Using data from the European Community Household Panel, this paper evaluates the impact of the exogenous reductions in weekly working hours induced by reforms implemented in Portugal and France on worker ... [more ▼]

Using data from the European Community Household Panel, this paper evaluates the impact of the exogenous reductions in weekly working hours induced by reforms implemented in Portugal and France on worker wellbeing. Difference-in-differences estimation results suggest that reduced working hours generated significant and robust increases in job and leisure satisfaction of the workers affected in both countries (from 0.07 to 0.15 standard deviation increases), with the rise in the former mainly being explained by greater satisfaction with working hours and working conditions. Further results suggest that staff representative bodies are important for ensuring that working-time reductions lead to welfare gains. [less ▲]

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See detailWorking Time Mismatches and Self-Assessed Health of Married Couples: Evidence from Germany
Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Social Science and Medicine (2019)

Underemployment and overemployment are widespread in developed countries and have detrimental consequences on health. This article tackles the question of the relationship between health and own, spousal ... [more ▼]

Underemployment and overemployment are widespread in developed countries and have detrimental consequences on health. This article tackles the question of the relationship between health and own, spousal and cross working time mismatches in bi-active couples. Using 83,000 observations from the German SOEP (1997–2012) I demonstrate that self-assessed health is reduced in case of overemployment and underemployment. I find that living with an overemployed partner is negatively correlated with own health. However, I show that the effect of overemployment is lower for those who live with an overemployed partner. This positive cross-effect is consistent with the existence of a comparison norm effect within household. Those results are robust to a battery of sensitivity checks and mostly transit via mental health. This article concludes that overemployment does not only affect the overemployed workers but also their partner and not accounting for such spillovers leads to an underestimation of the total health costs of overemployment. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Causes and Consequences of Early-Adult Unemployment: Evidence from Cohort Data
Clark, Andrew UL; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization (2019)

We here use the employment-history data from the British Cohort Study to calculate an individual’s total experience of unemployment from the time they left education up to age 30. We show that ... [more ▼]

We here use the employment-history data from the British Cohort Study to calculate an individual’s total experience of unemployment from the time they left education up to age 30. We show that, conditional on current unemployment, this experience is negatively correlated with the life satisfaction that the individual reports at age 30, so that past unemployment scars. We also identify the childhood circumstances and family background that predict this adult unemployment experience. Educational achievement and good behaviour at age 16 both reduce adult unemployment experience, and emotional health at age 16 is a particularly strong predictor of unemployment experience for women. Both boys and girls reproduce on average their parents’ unemployment, so that adult unemployment experience is transmitted between generations. We uncover evidence of a social-norm effect: children from less-advantaged backgrounds both experience more adult unemployment but are less affected by it in well-being. [less ▲]

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See detailGender Norms and Relative Working Hours: Why Do Women Suffer More than Men from Working Longer Hours than their Partner?
Fleche, Sarah; Lepinteur, Anthony UL; Powdthavee, Nattavudh

in American Economic Association - Papers and Proceedings (2018)

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See detailPartial Employment Protection and Perceived Job Security: Evidence from France
Georgieff, Alexandre; Lepinteur, Anthony UL

in Oxford Economic Papers (2018)

This paper assesses the causal effect of partial employment protection on workers' subjective job security via the perceived probability of layoff. We consider the rise in the French Delalande tax, which ... [more ▼]

This paper assesses the causal effect of partial employment protection on workers' subjective job security via the perceived probability of layoff. We consider the rise in the French Delalande tax, which is paid by private firms if they lay off older workers. This reform was restricted to large firms and therefore allows us to use a difference-in-differences strategy. In ECHP data, we find that the change in the perceived probability of layoffs induced by the higher Delalande tax improved the subjective job security of older (protected) workers, but at the cost of a negative externality on other workers. The changes in job security in both groups are of similar size, but as unprotected workers are the large majority of the sample, the population effect of the tax on layoffs was to reduce job security. [less ▲]

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