References of "Laurini, Christina 50002174"
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See detailL-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation in breast cancer cells and in vitro is mediated by RSK downstream of the ERK/MAPK pathway
Lommel, Maiti UL; Trairatphisan, Panuwat UL; Gäbler, Karoline UL et al

in FASEB Journal (2016)

Deregulated cell migration and invasion are hallmarks of metastatic cancer cells. Phosphorylation on residue Ser5 of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin activates L-plastin and has been reported to be ... [more ▼]

Deregulated cell migration and invasion are hallmarks of metastatic cancer cells. Phosphorylation on residue Ser5 of the actin-bundling protein L-plastin activates L-plastin and has been reported to be crucial for invasion and metastasis. Here, we investigate signal transduction leading to L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation using 4 human breast cancer cell lines. Whole-genome microarray analysis comparing cell lines with different invasive capacities and corresponding variations in L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation level revealed that genes of the ERK/MAPK pathway are differentially expressed. It is noteworthy that in vitro kinase assays showed that ERK/MAPK pathway downstream ribosomal protein S6 kinases α-1 (RSK1) and α-3 (RSK2) are able to directly phosphorylate L-plastin on Ser5. Small interfering RNA- or short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown and activation/inhibition studies followed by immunoblot analysis and computational modeling confirmed that ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) is an essential activator of L-plastin. Migration and invasion assays showed that RSK knockdown led to a decrease of up to 30% of migration and invasion of MDA-MB-435S cells. Although the presence of L-plastin was not necessary for migration/invasion of these cells, immunofluorescence assays illustrated RSK-dependent recruitment of Ser5-phosphorylated L-plastin to migratory structures. Altogether, we provide evidence that the ERK/MAPK pathway is involved in L-plastin Ser5 phosphorylation in breast cancer cells with RSK1 and RSK2 kinases able to directly phosphorylate L-plastin residue Ser5. [less ▲]

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See detailmiR-661 expression in SNAI1-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition contributes to breast cancer cell invasion by targeting Nectin-1 and StarD10 messengers
Vetter, G.; Saumet, A.; Moes, Michèle UL et al

in Oncogene (2016), 35(5), 670

Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step toward metastasis. MCF7 breast cancer cells conditionally expressing the EMT master regulator SNAI1 were used to identify early expressed microRNAs ... [more ▼]

Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key step toward metastasis. MCF7 breast cancer cells conditionally expressing the EMT master regulator SNAI1 were used to identify early expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) and their targets that may contribute to the EMT process. Potential targets of miRNAs were identified by matching lists of in silico predicted targets and of inversely expressed mRNAs. MiRNAs were ranked based on the number of predicted hits, highlighting miR-661, a miRNA with so far no reported role in EMT. MiR-661 was found required for efficient invasion of breast cancer cells by destabilizing two of its predicted mRNA targets, the cell-cell adhesion protein Nectin-1 and the lipid transferase StarD10, resulting, in turn, in the downregulation of epithelial markers. Reexpression of Nectin-1 or StarD10 lacking the 3'-untranslated region counteracted SNAI1-induced invasion. Importantly, analysis of public transcriptomic data from a cohort of 295 well-characterized breast tumor specimen revealed that expression of StarD10 is highly associated with markers of luminal subtypes whereas its loss negatively correlated with the EMT-related, basal-like subtype. Collectively, our non-a priori approach revealed a nonpredicted link between SNAI1-triggered EMT and the down-regulation of Nectin-1 and StarD10 through the up-regulation of miR-661, which may contribute to the invasion of breast cancer cells and poor disease outcome. [less ▲]

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See detailA Novel Network Integrating a miRNA-203/SNAI1 Feedback Loop which Regulates Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.
Moes, Michèle UL; Le Béchec, Antony UL; Crespo, Isaac UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2012), 7(4), 35440

Background: The majority of human cancer deaths are caused by metastasis. The metastatic dissemination is initiated by the breakdown of epithelial cell homeostasis. During this phenomenon, referred to as ... [more ▼]

Background: The majority of human cancer deaths are caused by metastasis. The metastatic dissemination is initiated by the breakdown of epithelial cell homeostasis. During this phenomenon, referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), cells change their genetic and trancriptomic program leading to phenotypic and functional alterations. The challenge of understanding this dynamic process resides in unraveling regulatory networks involving master transcription factors (e.g. SNAI1/2, ZEB1/2 and TWIST1) and microRNAs. Here we investigated microRNAs regulated by SNAI1 and their potential role in the regulatory networks underlying epithelial plasticity. Results: By a large-scale analysis on epithelial plasticity, we highlighted miR-203 and its molecular link with SNAI1 and the miR-200 family, key regulators of epithelial homeostasis. During SNAI1-induced EMT in MCF7 breast cancer cells, miR-203 and miR-200 family members were repressed in a timely correlated manner. Importantly, miR-203 repressed endogenous SNAI1, forming a double negative miR203/SNAI1 feedback loop. We integrated this novel miR203/SNAI1 with the known miR200/ZEB feedback loops to construct an a priori EMT core network. Dynamic simulations revealed stable epithelial and mesenchymal states, and underscored the crucial role of the miR203/SNAI1 feedback loop in state transitions underlying epithelial plasticity. Conclusion: By combining computational biology and experimental approaches, we propose a novel EMT core network integrating two fundamental negative feedback loops, miR203/SNAI1 and miR200/ZEB. Altogether our analysis implies that this novel EMT core network could function as a switch controlling epithelial cell plasticity during differentiation and cancer progression. [less ▲]

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