References of "Lallemand, Carine 50009322"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailOffice Agents: Personal Office Vitality Sensors with Intent
Stamhuis, Sjoerd; Brombacher, Hans; Vos, Steven et al

Scientific Conference (2021, May)

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what ... [more ▼]

In smart office buildings, almost every aspect of the environment can be assessed and adjusted by sensors. Yet employees rarely have access to the data collected to act upon it. It is also unclear what they would find meaningful to follow the recommendations on healthy work conditions and behavior, while productivity is the priority. The Office Agents are a set of artefacts placed on the employee’s desk, which capture data about the office environment. Air quality, sound level, light exposure, productivity, and physical activity level are measured to provide office workers with feedback on the ‘best’ working conditions. Using speculative design and Objects with Intent, the employee engages in a negotiation with the Office Agents based on the office ecosystem. Through this project and interactivity session, we open a debate on the use of sensors in office environments and the stakes around office vitality from the viewpoint of the employees. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 84 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExperimenter Effects in Children Using the Smileyometer Scale
Lehnert, Florence Kristin UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 19)

Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these ... [more ▼]

Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these challenges is related to the validity and reliability of user experience measurement tools. Scale designs, like the Smileyometer, have been proven to contain biases such as the tendency for children to rate almost every technology as great. This explorative paper discusses a possible effect of two experimenter styles on the distribution of 6-8 years old pupils' ratings (N= 73) to the Smileyometer. We administered the scale before and after a tablet-based assessment in two schools. Experimenter 1 employed a child-directed speech compared to a monotone speech of Experimenter 2. While brilliant (5 out of 5) was the most frequent answer option in all conditions, the mean scores were higher and associated with a lower variability across both conditions for Experimenter 2. We discuss a possible experimenter effect in the Smileyometer and implications for evaluating children’s user experiences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 119 (5 UL)
See detailHow do pupils experience Technology-Based Assessments? Implications for methodological approaches to measuring the User Experience based on two case studies in France and Luxembourg
Lehnert, Florence Kristin UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 12)

Technology-based assessments (TBAs) are widely used in the education field to examine whether the learning goals were achieved. To design fair and child-friendly TBAs that enable pupils to perform at ... [more ▼]

Technology-based assessments (TBAs) are widely used in the education field to examine whether the learning goals were achieved. To design fair and child-friendly TBAs that enable pupils to perform at their best (i.a. independent of individual differences in computer literacy), we must ensure reliable and valid data collection. By reducing Human-Computer Interaction issues, we provide the best possible assessment conditions and user experience (UX) with the TBA and reduce educational inequalities. Good UX is thus a prerequisite for better data validity. Building on a recent case study, we investigated how pupils perform TBAs in real-life settings. We addressed the context-dependent factors resulting from the observations that ultimately influence the UX. The first case study was conducted with pupils age 6 to 7 in three elementary schools in France (n=61) in collaboration with la direction de l’évaluation, de la prospective et de la performance (DEPP). The second case study was done with pupils age 12 to 16 in four secondary schools in Luxembourg (n=104) in collaboration with the Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing (LUCET). This exploratory study focused on the collection of various qualitative datasets to identify factors that influence the interaction with the TBA. We also discuss the importance of teachers’ moderation style and mere system-related characteristics, such as audio protocols of the assessment data. This study contribution comprises design recommendations and implications for methodological approaches to measuring pupils’ user experience during TBAs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 70 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Framework of Security-Enhancing Friction: How UX Can Help Users Behave More Securely
Distler, Verena UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in New Security Paradigms Workshop (2020, October 26)

A growing body of research in the usable privacy and security community addresses the question of how to best influence user behavior to reduce risk-taking.We propose to address this challenge by ... [more ▼]

A growing body of research in the usable privacy and security community addresses the question of how to best influence user behavior to reduce risk-taking.We propose to address this challenge by integrating the concept of user experience (UX) into empirical usable privacy and security studies that attempt to change risktaking behavior. UX enables us to study the complex interplay between user-related, system-related and contextual factors and provides insights into the experiential aspects underlying behavior change, including negative experiences. We first compare and contrast existing security-enhancing interventions (e.g., nudges, warnings, fear appeals) through the lens of friction. We then build on these insights to argue that it can be desirable to design for moments of negative UX in security-critical situations. For this purpose, we introduce the novel concept of security-enhancing friction, friction that effectively reduces the occurrence of risk-taking behavior and ensures that the overall UX (after use) is not compromised. We illustrate how security-enhancing friction provides an actionable way to systematically integrate the concept of UX into empirical usable privacy and security studies for meeting both the objectives of secure behavior and of overall acceptable experience. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 192 (39 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring the Contextual Dimension of User Experience: Development of the User Experience Context Scale (UXCS)
Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society (2020, October)

The context of use has been highlighted for a long time as being a key factor impacting User Experience (UX). Yet current UX evaluation tools, especially questionnaires, rarely encompass an explicit ... [more ▼]

The context of use has been highlighted for a long time as being a key factor impacting User Experience (UX). Yet current UX evaluation tools, especially questionnaires, rarely encompass an explicit investigation of the context. With the ever-growing trend for mobile products and ubiquitous computing, the absence of a dedicated measurement tool becomes critical. Based on a review of relevant literature and a fine-grained categorization of contextual factors, we developed the UX Context Scale (UXCS), a 30-items instrument allowing for a measure of context properties, as perceived by the user. We report on the development of the scale and present a first validation study (N = 137). A principal component analysis on the subjective items reveals a 6-components structure: Physical Context, Social Context, Internal Context, Perceived Resources, Task Context, and Temporal Context. Reliability of each subscale is high and further analyses confirm the relevance of this tool for UX evaluation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 57 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGuided by Lights: Stimulating Physical Activity through an Outdoor Interactive Light System
Rensvouw, van, Loes; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fok, Bodi et al

in Proceedings of the Design4Health Conference (2020)

Increasing physical inactivity and its subsequent health concerns have made promoting healthy and active lifestyles an important endeavour for many governing agencies. In this paper we focus on the ... [more ▼]

Increasing physical inactivity and its subsequent health concerns have made promoting healthy and active lifestyles an important endeavour for many governing agencies. In this paper we focus on the influence of the environment to encourage people to move more. As a second iteration of an existing ‘Smart Exercise Route’, a 1.8 km walking and running path consisting of LED tiles in a public park, we designed a system that supports runners or walkers to set personal goals and gain intrinsic motivation to be physically active. The design focuses on aspects that positively impact motivation and/or performance: personalization, goal setting, and feedback mechanisms. An initial evaluation of a prototype placed in three public parks, showed that participants (N=35) appreciated the personalization of the route and its goal-setting opportunities. While one third of participants indicated the prototype as directly motivating, these positively experienced features are expected to indirectly increase motivation to be more active even further. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe office jungle: A vision for wildness to turn offices into jungles
Nieuweboer, I.; Damen, I.; Brombacher, H. et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

The Office Jungle is an experimental office environment designed to make offices more "wild". Through this demonstration and associated design vision, we make a first attempt to reflect on and to define ... [more ▼]

The Office Jungle is an experimental office environment designed to make offices more "wild". Through this demonstration and associated design vision, we make a first attempt to reflect on and to define what characterizes wildness and how it could empower people in more playful and active lifestyles, particularly in the workplace. In our understanding, wildness is not an exclusive property of nature, but rather a condition that can be designed for. How wildness can be designed is described here in a set of design principles called "Design for Wildness", inspired by the work of Gibson. The Office Jungle, a large geodesic sphere of 2 meters in diameter, is part and parcel of these design principles and can be used as a tool to design other wild environments. Such environments could benefit people working in the office, many of whom have been suffering the consequences of a sedentary lifestyle. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIvy: A qualitative interface to reduce sedentary behavior in the office context
Menheere, Daphne; Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a ... [more ▼]

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a qualitative interface called Ivy, we illustrate a design approach that is currently underrepresented in sedentary behavior interventions. With this approach, we counter the current trend of digitalization and quantification of health interventions. Instead of graphs and numbers, Ivy uses data physicalization as a qualitative interface that represents sitting. We describe the design, the process, and future research steps of Ivy as a critical perspective on sedentary behavior interventions. We aim to spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction to use qualitative interfaces as a promising approach to deepen the user's relationship with the targeted behavior and enrich the ability to construct meaning from the feedback. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPositionPeak: Stimulating position changes during meetings
Damen, Ida; Heerkens, Lidewij; Van Den Broek, Annabel et al

in Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (2020)

In office environments, workers spend the majority of their workday sitting in a static position behind a desk or around a meeting table. Prolonged sitting time and sedentary behavior have severe negative ... [more ▼]

In office environments, workers spend the majority of their workday sitting in a static position behind a desk or around a meeting table. Prolonged sitting time and sedentary behavior have severe negative health effects. Through this explorative study, we studied how different postures can be stimulated during meetings. We designed PositionPeak: three pieces of furniture aimed at composing a 'dynamic meeting room', subtly encouraging participants to avoid static postures. We video-recorded 5 meetings (N=16) and coded the number of position changes per participant. Participants also filled out a pre- and post-questionnaire about their experience. Our findings show that PositionPeak triggers people to adopt a variety of postures. Participants on average experienced a more efficient meeting but reported physical discomfort with some objects. We discuss the influence of PositionPeak on the meetings' social dynamics, the acceptance of new conventions and design recommendations for new meeting facilities. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIvy: Reading a critical design for sedentary behavior in the office context
Damen, Ida; Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office chair that represents the amount of sitting time through growing ivy strands. Using the matrix of common argument types by Bardzell et al., we propose a structured "reading" of Ivy, as an example supporting reasoned and accessible conversations about criticality in design. Our reading of Ivy emphasized that its criticality emerges mainly from data physicalization as a new form of interactivity intended to trigger reflectiveness. The insights of this design study contribute towards a critical perspective on designing interventions to reduce sedentary time and spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailVisualizing Computer-Based Activity on Ambient Displays to Reduce Sedentary Behavior at Work
Brombacher, Hans; Ren, Xipei; Vos, Steven et al

in 32ND AUSTRALIAN CONFERENCE ON HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERACTION (2020)

Workplace health interventions have predominantly been designed around visualizations of physical activity data in the work routine. Yet, contextual factors, such as computer-based activity, appears to be ... [more ▼]

Workplace health interventions have predominantly been designed around visualizations of physical activity data in the work routine. Yet, contextual factors, such as computer-based activity, appears to be crucial to support healthier behaviors at work. In this research, we explore the effect of visualizing computer-based activity to prompt physical activity at work, through desktop-based ambient displays. Based on our prototypes Yamin and Apphia, we conducted an exploratory qualitative user study in a lab setting with office workers (N=16). Results showed that visualizing one’s computer-based activity could potentially increase the awareness, self-reflection, and social interactions for individuals to become physically active. With our findings, we discuss design implications for using computer activity data in a physical form as a motivational factor to encourage physically active workstyles. We present directions for future field studies to gain further insights on this topic. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe hub: Facilitating walking meetings through a network of interactive devices
Damen, Ida; Kok, Anika; Vink, Bas et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the ... [more ▼]

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the social acceptance and wider adoption of walking meeting practice have been highlighted in previous research. Amongst these, the difficulty to take notes or present files is a recurring concern for office workers. To address these barriers, we designed the Hub, a network of stand-up meeting stations that accommodate different work-related tasks during walking meetings. We report on two pilot user tests investigating users' experiences and ideas for improvement, and present future research steps. We discuss the usefulness and relevance of the Hub concept to overcome the obstacles associated with walking meetings. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Diary Study on the Exercise Intention-Behaviour Gap: Implications for the Design of Interactive Products
Menheere, Daphne; Funk, Matthias; van der Spek, Erik et al

in DRS International Conference 2020 (2020)

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. One of the main challenges is to translate exercise intentions into actual exercise behaviour, the so-called ... [more ▼]

Increasingly aware of the importance of active lifestyles, many people intend to exercise more. One of the main challenges is to translate exercise intentions into actual exercise behaviour, the so-called intention-behaviour gap. To investigate barriers and enablers that affect this gap, we conducted a 7-day diary study with 16 participants. In this study, participants indicated what their exercise intentions and behaviour were per day, and whether and why they changed retrospectively during the day. Through the diary study, we gain insights into (i) the intention-behaviour interplay, and (ii) the experienced barriers and enablers that influence this interplay throughout the day. Based on the findings, we contribute new implications for design in supporting people translating their intentions into exercise behaviour, and propose three design concepts as examples. In these, the focus is on positively influencing the interplay of enablers and barriers of exercising and how these can be exemplified through design. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Runner's Journey: Identifying Design Opportunities for Running Motivation Technology
Menheere, D.; Lallemand, Carine UL; Van Der Spek, E. et al

in ACM International Conference Proceeding Series (2020)

Running is a popular recreational sport, yet for many amateur runners it remains challenging to turn intentions into sustainable running behavior. Although the market offers a myriad of running-related ... [more ▼]

Running is a popular recreational sport, yet for many amateur runners it remains challenging to turn intentions into sustainable running behavior. Although the market offers a myriad of running-related devices that aim to motivate runners, these often focus on the training itself and not on overcoming the barriers experienced prior to the run. A better understanding of these barriers to running is essential to identify design opportunities for technologies supporting amateur runners. We conducted two complementary studies among participants of a women-only running event. Combining an online survey (N = 114) and a journey mapping activity (N = 13), we investigated the influence of motivational barriers and enablers in runners' rituals. Based on our findings, we created the Runner's Journey, a visual narrative highlighting actionable design opportunities for running motivation technology. We propose five design recommendations to overcome barriers among amateur runners. © 2020 ACM. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRunner's Perceptions of Reasons to Quit Running: Influence of Gender, Age and Running-Related Characteristics.
Menheere, Daphne; Janssen, Mark; Funk, Mathias et al

in International journal of environmental research and public health (2020), 17(17),

Physical inactivity has become a major public health concern and, consequently, the awareness of striving for a healthy lifestyle has increased. As a result, the popularity of recreational sports, such as ... [more ▼]

Physical inactivity has become a major public health concern and, consequently, the awareness of striving for a healthy lifestyle has increased. As a result, the popularity of recreational sports, such as running, has increased. Running is known for its low threshold to start and its attractiveness for a heterogeneous group of people. Yet, one can still observe high drop-out rates among (novice) runners. To understand the reasons for drop-out as perceived by runners, we investigate potential reasons to quit running among short distance runners (5 km and 10 km) (n = 898). Data used in this study were drawn from the standardized online Eindhoven Running Survey 2016 (ERS16). Binary logistic regressions were used to investigate the relation between reasons to quit running and different variables like socio-demographic variables, running habits and attitudes, interests, and opinions (AIOs) on running. Our results indicate that, not only people of different gender and age show significant differences in perceived reasons to quit running, also running habits, (e.g., running context and frequency) and AIOs are related to perceived reasons to quit running too. With insights into these related variables, potential drop-out reasons could help health professionals in understanding and lowering drop-out rates among recreational runners. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 31 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFaye: An Empathy Probe to Investigate Motivation Among Novice Runners
Menheere, D.; Lallemand, Carine UL; Funk, M. et al

in Communications in Computer and Information Science (2020), 1294

The popularity of recreational sports such as running, has increased substantially due to its low threshold to start and it is attractive for a wide range of people. However, despite the growing ... [more ▼]

The popularity of recreational sports such as running, has increased substantially due to its low threshold to start and it is attractive for a wide range of people. However, despite the growing popularity, running has a high drop-out rate due to injuries and motivational loss, especially among novice runners. To investigate factors influencing motivation among novice runners and design opportunities, we deployed an empathy probe at a women-only running event. Faye is a running shirt that reveals motivational feedback on the shirt, during the warm-up phase of the run. In this paper, we both inform on the impact of motivational feedback while warming up on running motivation and reflect on the use of an empathy probe to investigate motivational strategies among novice runners. © 2020, Springer Nature Switzerland AG. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow Do Runners Experience Personalization of Their Training Scheme: The Inspirun E-Coach?
Janssen, Mark; Goudsmit, Jos; Lauwerijssen, Coen et al

in Sensors (2020), 20(16),

Among runners, there is a high drop-out rate due to injuries and loss of motivation. These runners often lack personalized guidance and support. While there is much potential for sports apps to act as (e ... [more ▼]

Among runners, there is a high drop-out rate due to injuries and loss of motivation. These runners often lack personalized guidance and support. While there is much potential for sports apps to act as (e-)coaches to help these runners to avoid injuries, set goals, and maintain good intentions, most available running apps primarily focus on persuasive design features like monitoring, they offer few or no features that support personalized guidance (e.g., personalized training schemes). Therefore, we give a detailed description of the working mechanism of Inspirun e-Coach app and on how this app uses a personalized coaching approach with automatic adaptation of training schemes based on biofeedback and GPS-data. We also share insights into how end-users experience this working mechanism. The primary conclusion of this study is that the working mechanism (if provided with accurate data) automatically adapts training sessions to the runners' physical workload and stimulates runners' goal perception, motivation, and experienced personalization. With this mechanism, we attempted to make optimal use of the potential of wearable technology to support the large group of novice or less experienced runners and that by providing insight in our working mechanisms, it can be applied in other technologies, wearables, and types of sports. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 43 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhich App to Choose? An Online Tool that Supports the Decision-making Process of Recreational Runners to Choose an App
Janssen, Mark; Lallemand, Carine UL; Hoes, Kevin et al

in Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Design4Health Amsterdam 2020 (2020)

In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the use of health and sports-related smartphone applications (apps). This is also reflected in App-stores, which are stacked with thousands of ... [more ▼]

In recent years, there has been an exponential increase in the use of health and sports-related smartphone applications (apps). This is also reflected in App-stores, which are stacked with thousands of health- and sports-apps, with new apps launched each day. These apps have great potential to monitor and support people’s physical activity and health. For users, however, it is difficult to know which app suits their needs. In this paper, we present an online tool that supports the decision-making process for choosing an appropriate app. We constructed and validated a screening instrument to assess app content quality, together with the assessment of users’ needs. Both served as input for building the tool through various iterations with prototypes and user tests. This resulted in an online tool which relies on app content quality scores to match the users’ needs with apps that score high in the screening instrument on those particular needs. Users can add new apps to the database via the screening instrument, making the tool self supportive and future proof. A feedback loop allows users to give feedback on the recommended app and how well it meets their needs. This feedback is added to the database and used in future filtering and recommendations. The principles used can be applied to other areas of sports, physical activity and health to help users to select an app that suits their needs. Potentially increasing the long-term use of apps to monitor and to support physical activity and health. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMaking Encryption Feel Secure: Investigating how Descriptions of Encryption Impact Perceived Security
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in The 5th European Workshop on Usable Security (EuroUSEC 2020) (2020)

When communication about security to end users is ineffective, people frequently misinterpret the protection offered by a system. The discrepancy between the security users perceive a system to have and ... [more ▼]

When communication about security to end users is ineffective, people frequently misinterpret the protection offered by a system. The discrepancy between the security users perceive a system to have and the actual system state can lead to potentially risky behaviors. It is thus crucial to understand how security perceptions are shaped by interface elements such as text-based descriptions of encryption. This article addresses the question of how encryption should be described to non-experts in a way that enhances perceived security. We tested the following within-subject variables in an online experiment (N=309): a) how to best word encryption, b) whether encryption should be described with a focus on the process or outcome, or both c) whether the objective of encryption should be mentioned d) when mentioning the objective of encryption, how to best describe it e) whether a hash should be displayed to the user. We also investigated the role of context (between subjects). The verbs “encrypt” and “secure” performed comparatively well at enhancing perceived security. Overall, participants stated that they felt more secure not knowing about the objective of encryption. When it is necessary to state the objective, positive wording of the objective of encryption worked best. We discuss implications and why using these results to design for perceived lack of security might be of interest as well. This leads us to discuss ethical concerns, and we give guidelines for the design of user interfaces where encryption should be communicated to end users. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 90 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Scoping Review of Digital Tools to Reduce Physical Inactivity in Knowledge Workers
Damen, Ida; Brombacher, Hans; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020), 17(2),

Detailed reference viewed: 22 (1 UL)