References of "Lagerwall, Jan 50002154"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailCombining responsiveness and durability in liquid crystal-functionalised electrospun fibres with crosslinked sheath
Vats, Shameek UL; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Liquid Crystals (2021)

Responsive functional composite fibre mats that are mechanically stable and impervious to water exposure are produced by coaxial electrospinning of thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) core inside a water ... [more ▼]

Responsive functional composite fibre mats that are mechanically stable and impervious to water exposure are produced by coaxial electrospinning of thermotropic liquid crystal (LC) core inside a water-based solution of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) forming the sheath. Because thermotropic LCs usually cannot be spun inside water-based solutions due to excessive interfacial tension γ, a n enabling step is the addition of ethanol or dioxane to the LC as a co-solvent compatible with both core and sheath fluids. This reduces γ sufficiently that coaxial jet spinning is possible. After spinning, thermal cross-linking of the PVA+PAA sheath yields LC-functionalised fibres that can be manipulated by hand and remain intact even upon full immersion in water. The LC core retains its behaviour, nematics showing well-aligned birefringence and transitioning to isotropic upon heating above the clearing point, and cholesterics showing selective reflection which is even enhanced upon water immersion due to the removal of sheath scattering. Our results pave the way to producing LC-functionalised responsive fibre mats using durable polymer sheaths, thereby enabling numerous innovative applications in wearable technology, and they also open new opportunities to study LCs in confinement, without visible impact of the container walls. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 18 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailElectrospinning Ethanol–Water Solutions of Poly(Acrylic Acid): Nonlinear Viscosity Variations and Dynamic Taylor Cone Behavior
Vats, Shameek UL; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Macromolecular Materials and Engineering (2021)

Electrospinning of polymer solutions is a multifaceted process that depends on the careful balancing of many parameters to achieve a desired outcome, in many cases including mixtures of multiple solvents ... [more ▼]

Electrospinning of polymer solutions is a multifaceted process that depends on the careful balancing of many parameters to achieve a desired outcome, in many cases including mixtures of multiple solvents. A systematic study of how the solution viscosity 𝜼—a good probe of solvent–polymer interactions—and the electrospinnability change when poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) is dissolved in ethanol–water mixtures at varying mixing ratio is carried out. A pronounced maximum is found in 𝜼 at a water-to-ethanol molar ratio of about 2:1, where the solvent mixture deviates maximally from ideal mixing behavior and partial deprotonation of carboxyl groups by water coincides synergistically with dissolution of the uncharged protonated PAA fraction by ethanol. The PAA concentration is tuned as a function of water–ethanol ratio to obtain a common value of 𝜼 for all solvent mixtures that is suitable for electrospinning. For high PAA content, the Taylor cone grows in volume over time despite minimum solution flow rate, even experiencing surface gelation for ethanol-rich solutions. This is attributed to the hygroscopic nature of PAA, drawing excess water into the Taylor cone from the air during spinning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStable Electrospinning of Core-Functionalized Coaxial Fibers Enabled by the Minimum-Energy Interface Given by Partial Core− Sheath Miscibility
Vats, Shameek UL; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Langmuir (2021), 37(45), 1326513277

Core−sheath electrospinning is a powerful tool for producing composite fibers with one or multiple encapsulated functional materials, but many material combinations are difficult or even impossible to ... [more ▼]

Core−sheath electrospinning is a powerful tool for producing composite fibers with one or multiple encapsulated functional materials, but many material combinations are difficult or even impossible to spin together. We show that the key to success is to ensure a well-defined core−sheath interface while also maintaining a constant and minimal interfacial energy across this interface. Using a thermotropic liquid crystal as a model functional core and polyacrylic acid or styrene-butadiene-styrene block copolymer as a sheath polymer, we study the effects of using water, ethanol, or tetrahydrofuran as polymer solvent. We find that the ideal core and sheath materials are partially miscible, with their phase diagram exhibiting an inner miscibility gap. Complete immiscibility yields a relatively high interfacial tension that causes core breakup, even preventing the core from entering the fiber- producing jet, whereas the lack of a well-defined interface in the case of complete miscibility eliminates the core−sheath morphology, and it turns the core into a coagulation bath for the sheath solution, causing premature gelation in the Taylor cone. Moreover, to minimize Marangoni flows in the Taylor cone due to local interfacial tension variations, a small amount of the sheath solvent should be added to the core prior to spinning. Our findings resolve a long-standing confusion regarding guidelines for selecting core and sheath fluids in core−sheath electrospinning. These discoveries can be applied to many other material combinations than those studied here, enabling new functional composites of large interest and application potential. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailTopological Defect-Guided Regular Stacking of Focal Conic Domains in Hybrid-Aligned Smectic Liquid Crystal Shells
Noh, Junghyun; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Crystals (2021), 11(8), 913

We study liquid crystal (LC) shells in hybrid configuration (director tangential to the inside but normal to the outside) as they slowly undergo a transition from a nematic (N) to a smectic-A (SmA) phase ... [more ▼]

We study liquid crystal (LC) shells in hybrid configuration (director tangential to the inside but normal to the outside) as they slowly undergo a transition from a nematic (N) to a smectic-A (SmA) phase. Every shell has two antipodal +1 topological defects, at the thinnest and thickest points, respectively. On cooling from N to SmA, the symmetry axis connecting the defects gradually reorients from blackalong gravity to perpendicular to it, reversibly and continuously, if the LC and aqueous phase are density matched at the N-SmA transition. This suggests reduced density near the defects---reflecting a local reduction in order---under the strong confinement with antagonistic boundary conditions. In the SmA phase, a regular array of focal conic domains (FCDs) develops, templated in position and orientation by the +1 defect at the thinnest point. Around this defect, a single complete toroidal FCD always develops, surrounded by incomplete FCDs. In contrast to similar FCD arrangements on flat aqueous interfaces, this is a stable situation, since the two +1 defects are required by the spherical topology. Our results demonstrate how the topological defects of LC shells can be used to template complex self-organized structures. blackWith a suitable adaption of the LC chemistry, shells might serve as a basis for producing solid particles with complex yet highly regular morphologies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEncoding Hidden Information onto Surfaces Using Polymerized Cholesteric Spherical Reflectors
Geng, Yong UL; Kizhakidathazhath, Rijeesh UL; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Advanced Functional Materials (2021)

The omnidirectional Bragg reflection of cholesteric liquid crystals molded into spheres turns them into narrow-band retroreflectors with distinct circular polarization. It is shown that these cholesteric ... [more ▼]

The omnidirectional Bragg reflection of cholesteric liquid crystals molded into spheres turns them into narrow-band retroreflectors with distinct circular polarization. It is shown that these cholesteric spherical reflectors (CSRs) can encode information onto surfaces for far-field optical read-out without false positives, as the selective retroreflectivity allows the background to be easily subtracted. In order to hide the encoding from detection by the human eye, the retroreflection band is tuned to the near-UV or IR spectra, allowing ubiquitous deployment of CSRs in human-populated environments. This opens diverse application opportunities, for instance, in supporting safe robotic navigation and in augmented reality. A key breakthrough is our ability to permanently embed CSRs in a binder such that undesired scattering and reflections are minimized. This is achieved by realizing CSRs as shells that are polymerized from the liquid crystalline state. The resulting shrinkage around an incompressible fluid deforms the thinnest region of each shell such that it ruptures at a well-defined point. This leaves a single small hole in every CSR that gives access to the interior, allowing complete embedding in the binder with optimized refractive index, minimizing visibility. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 92 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailEmbedding Intelligence in Materials for Responsive Built Environment using Liquid Crystal Elastomer Actuators and Sensors
Schwartz, Mathew; Lagerwall, Jan UL

E-print/Working paper (2021)

Liquid Crystal Elastomers (LCEs) are an exciting category of material that has tremendous application potential across a variety of fields, owing to their unique properties that enable both sensing and ... [more ▼]

Liquid Crystal Elastomers (LCEs) are an exciting category of material that has tremendous application potential across a variety of fields, owing to their unique properties that enable both sensing and actuation. To some, LCEs are simply another type of Shape Memory Polymer, while to others they are an interesting on-going scientific experiment. In this visionary article, we bring an interdisciplinary discussion around creative and impactful ways that LCEs can be applied in the Built Environment to support kinematic and kinetic buildings and situational awareness. We focus particularly on the autonomy made possible by using LCEs, potentially removing needs for motors, wiring and tubing, and even enabling fully independent operation in response to natural environment variations, requiring no power sources. To illustrate the potential, we propose a number of concrete application scenarios where LCEs could offer innovative solutions to problems of great societal importance, such as autonomous active ventilation, heliotropic solar panels systems which can also remove snow or sand autonomously, and invisible coatings with strain mapping functionality, alerting residents in case of dangerous (static or dynamic) loads on roofs or windows, as well as assisting building safety inspection teams after earthquakes. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 28 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDynamic tuning of the director field in liquid crystal shells using block copolymers
Noh, Junghyun; Wang, Yiwei; Liang, Hsin-Ling et al

in Physical Review Research (2020), 2(3), 033160

When an orientationally ordered system, like a nematic liquid crystal (LC), is confined on a self-closing spherical shell, topological constraints arise with intriguing consequences that depend critically ... [more ▼]

When an orientationally ordered system, like a nematic liquid crystal (LC), is confined on a self-closing spherical shell, topological constraints arise with intriguing consequences that depend critically on how the LC is aligned in the shell. We demonstrate reversible dynamic tuning of the alignment, and thereby the topology, of nematic LC shells stabilized by the nonionic amphiphilic block copolymer Pluronic F127. Deep in the nematic phase, the director (the average molecule orientation) is tangential to the interface, but upon approaching the temperature TNI of the nematic-isotropic transition, the director realigns to normal. We link this to a delicate interplay between an interfacial tension that is nearly independent of director orientation, and the configuration-dependent elastic deformation energy of an LC confined in a shell. The process is primarily triggered by the heating-induced reduction of the nematic order parameter, hence realignment temperatures differ by several tens of degrees between LCs with high and low TNI, respectively. The temperature of realignment is always lower on the positive-curved shell outside than at the negative-curved inside, yielding a complex topological reconfiguration on heating. Complementing experimental investigations with mathematical modeling and computer simulations, we identify and investigate three different trajectories, distinguished by their configurations of topological defects in the initial tangential-aligned shell. Our results uncover a new aspect of the complex response of LCs to curved confinement, demonstrating that the order of the LC itself can influence the alignment and thereby the topology of the system. They also reveal the potential of amphiphilic block copolymer stabilizers for enabling continuous tunability of LC shell configuration, opening doors for in-depth studies of topological dynamics as well as novel applications in, e.g., sensing and programed soft actuators. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDisruption of Electrospinning due to Water Condensation into the Taylor Cone.
Reyes, C. G.; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces (2020), 12(23), 26566--26576

The well-known problems of electrospinning hygroscopic polymer fibers in humid air are usually attributed to water condensing onto the jet mid-flight: water enters the jet as an additional solvent ... [more ▼]

The well-known problems of electrospinning hygroscopic polymer fibers in humid air are usually attributed to water condensing onto the jet mid-flight: water enters the jet as an additional solvent, hindering solidification into well-defined fibers. Here, we show that fiber fusion and shape loss seen at the end of the process may actually stem from water already condensing into the Taylor cone from where the jet ejects, if the solvent is volatile and miscible with water, for example, ethanol. The addition of water can radically change the solvent character from good to poor, even if water on its own is an acceptable solvent. Moreover, and counterintuitively, the water condensation promotes solvent evaporation because of the release of heat through the phase transition as well as from the exothermic mixing process. The overall result is that the polymer solution develops a gel-like skin around the Taylor cone. The situation is significantly aggravated in the case of coaxial electrospinning to make functional composite fibers if the injected core fluid forms a complex phase diagram with miscibility gaps together with the polymer sheath solvent and the water condensing from the air. The resulting phase separation coagulates the polymer throughout the Taylor cone, as liquid droplets with different compositions nucleate and spread, setting up strong internal flows and concentration gradients. We demonstrate that these cases of uncontrolled polymer coagulation cause rapid Taylor cone deformation, multiple jet ejection, and the inability to spin coaxial fiber mats, illustrated by the example of coaxial electrospinning of an ethanolic polyvinylpyrrolidone solution with a thermotropic liquid crystal core, at varying humidities. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 108 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFrom Equilibrium Liquid Crystal Formation and Kinetic Arrest to Photonic Bandgap Films Using Suspensions of Cellulose Nanocrystals
Schütz, Christina; Bruckner, Johanna R.; Honorato-Rios, Camila et al

in Crystals (2020), 10(3), 199

The lyotropic cholesteric liquid crystal phase developed by suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) has come increasingly into focus from numerous directions over the last few years. In part, this is ... [more ▼]

The lyotropic cholesteric liquid crystal phase developed by suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) has come increasingly into focus from numerous directions over the last few years. In part, this is because CNC suspensions are sustainably produced aqueous suspensions of a fully bio-derived nanomaterial with attractive properties. Equally important is the interesting and useful behavior exhibited by solid CNC films, created by drying a cholesteric-forming suspension. However, the pathway along which these films are realized, starting from a CNC suspension that may have low enough concentration to be fully isotropic, is more complex than often appreciated, leading to reproducibility problems and confusion. Addressing a broad audience of physicists, chemists, materials scientists and engineers, this Review focuses primarily on the physics and physical chemistry of CNC suspensions and the process of drying them. The ambition is to explain rather than to repeat, hence we spend more time than usual on the meanings and relevance of the key colloid and liquid crystal science concepts that must be mastered in order to understand the behavior of CNC suspensions, and we present some interesting analyses, arguments and data for the first time. We go through the development of cholesteric nuclei (tactoids) from the isotropic phase and their potential impact on the final dry films; the spontaneous CNC fractionation that takes place in the phase coexistence window; the kinetic arrest that sets in when the CNC mass fraction reaches ~10 wt.\%, preserving the cholesteric helical order until the film has dried; the 'coffee-ring effect' active prior to kinetic arrest, often ruining the uniformity in the produced films; and the compression of the helix during the final water evaporation, giving rise to visible structural color in the films. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailResponsive Photonic Liquid Marbles
Anyfantakis, Manos; Jampani, Venkata S. R.; Kizhakidathazhath, Rijeesh UL et al

in Angewandte Chemie International Edition (2020), 59(43), 19260--19267

Liquid marbles have potential to serve as mini- reactors for fabricating new materials, but this has been exploited little and mostly for conventional chemical reactions. Here, we uncover the unparalleled ... [more ▼]

Liquid marbles have potential to serve as mini- reactors for fabricating new materials, but this has been exploited little and mostly for conventional chemical reactions. Here, we uncover the unparalleled capability of liquid marbles to act as platforms for controlling the self-assembly of a bio- derived polymer, hydroxypropyl cellulose, into a cholesteric liquid crystalline phase showing structural coloration by Bragg reflection. By adjusting the cholesteric pitch via quantitative water extraction, we achieve liquid marbles that we can tailor for structural color anywhere in the visible range. Liquid marbles respond with color change that can be detected by eye, to changes in temperature, exposure to toxic chemicals and mechanical deformation. Our concept demonstrates the ad- vantages of using liquid marbles as a miniature platform for controlling the liquid crystal self-assembly of bio-derived polymers, and their exploitation to fabricate sustainable, responsive soft photonic objects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInterrogating helical nanorod self-assembly with fractionated cellulose nanocrystal suspensions
Honorato-Rios, Camila; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Communications Materials (2020), 1

The helical self-assembly of cholesteric liquid crystals is a powerful motif in nature, enabling exceptional performance in many biological composites. Attempts to mimic these remarkable materials by ... [more ▼]

The helical self-assembly of cholesteric liquid crystals is a powerful motif in nature, enabling exceptional performance in many biological composites. Attempts to mimic these remarkable materials by drying cholesteric colloidal nanorod suspensions often yield films with a non-uniform mosaic-like character, severely degrading optical and mechanical properties. Here we show---using the example of cellulose nanocrystals---that these problems are due to rod length dispersity: uncontrolled phase separation results from a ... [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHigh-contrast imaging of 180 degrees ferroelectric domains by optical microscopy using ferroelectric liquid crystals
Nataf, Guillaume F.; Guennou, Mael UL; Scalia, Giusy UL et al

in APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS (2020), 116(21),

Ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) couple the direction of their spontaneous electric polarization to the direction of tilt of their optic axis. Consequently, reversal of the electric polarization by an ... [more ▼]

Ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) couple the direction of their spontaneous electric polarization to the direction of tilt of their optic axis. Consequently, reversal of the electric polarization by an electric field gives rise to an immediate and lasting optical response when an appropriately aligned FLC is observed between crossed polarizers, with one field direction yielding a dark image and the opposite direction yielding a bright image. Here, this peculiar electro-optic response is used to image, with high optical contrast, 180 degrees ferroelectric domains in a crystalline substrate of magnesium-doped lithium niobate. The lithium niobate substrate contains a few domains with upward electric polarization surrounded by regions with downward electric polarization. In contrast to a reference non-chiral liquid crystal that is unable to show ferroelectric behavior due to its high symmetry, the FLC, which is used as a thin film confined between the lithium niobate substrate and an inert aligning substrate, reveals ferroelectric domains as well as their boundaries, with strong black and white contrast. The results show that FLCs can be used for non-destructive readout of domains in underlying ferroelectrics, with potential applications in, e.g., photonic devices and non-volatile ferroelectric memories. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 41 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailFacile Anisotropic Deswelling Method for Realizing Large‐Area Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Elastomers with Uniform Structural Color and Broad‐Range Mechanochromic Response
Kizhakidathazhath, Rijeesh UL; Geng, Yong UL; Jampani, Venkata UL et al

in Advanced Functional Materials (2019)

Cholesteric liquid crystal elastomers (CLCEs) are soft and dynamic photonic elements that couple the circularly polarized structural color from the cho- lesteric helix to the viscoelasticity of rubbers ... [more ▼]

Cholesteric liquid crystal elastomers (CLCEs) are soft and dynamic photonic elements that couple the circularly polarized structural color from the cho- lesteric helix to the viscoelasticity of rubbers: the reflection color is mechani- cally tunable (mechanochromic response) over a broad range. This requires uniform helix orientation, previously realized by long-term centrifugation to ensure anisotropic deswelling, or using sacrificial substrates or external fields. The present paper presents a simple, reproducible, and scalable method to fab- ricate highly elastic, large-area, millimeters thick CLCE sheets with intense uni- form reflection color that is repeatably, rapidly, and continuously tunable across the full visible spectrum by stretching or compressing. A precursor solution is poured onto a substrate and allowed to polymerize into a 3D network during solvent evaporation. Pinning to the substrate prevents in-plane shrinkage, thereby realizing anisotropic deswelling in an unprecedentedly simple manner. Quantitative stress–strain–reflection wavelength characterization reveals behavior in line with theoretical predictions: two linear regimes are identified for strains below and above the helix unwinding threshold, respectively. Up to a doubling of the sample length, the continuous color variation across the full visible spectrum repeatedly follows a volume conserving function of the strain, allowing the CLCE to be used as optical high-resolution strain sensor. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (37 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailElastic sheath–liquid crystal core fibres achieved by microfluidic wet spinning
Honaker, Lawrence William UL; Vats, Shameek UL; Anyfantakis, Emmanouil UL et al

in Journal of Materials Chemistry C (2019)

While coaxial polymer sheath–liquid crystal core fibres attract interest for fundamental research as well as applied reasons, the main method for achieving them so far, electrospinning, is complex and has ... [more ▼]

While coaxial polymer sheath–liquid crystal core fibres attract interest for fundamental research as well as applied reasons, the main method for achieving them so far, electrospinning, is complex and has significant limitations. It has proven particularly challenging to spin fibres with an elastic sheath. As an alternative approach, we present a microfluidic wet spinning process that allows us to produce liquid crystal core–polyisoprene rubber sheath fibres on a laboratory scale. The fibres can be stretched by up to 300% with intact core–sheath geometry. We spin fibres with nematic as well as with cholesteric liquid crystal in the core, the latter turning the composite fibre into an elastic cylindrical photonic crystal. Iridescent colours are easily observable by the naked eye. As this coaxial wet spinning should be amenable to upscaling, this could allow large-scale production of innovative functional fibres, attractive through the various responsive characteristics of different liquid crystal phases being incorporated into an elastic textile fiber form factor. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 159 (27 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailRealignment of Liquid Crystal Shells Driven by Temperature- Dependent Surfactant Solubility
Sharma, Anjali UL; Jampani, Venkata UL; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Langmuir (2019), 35(2019), 1113211140

We investigate dynamic director field variations in shells of the nematic liquid crystal (LC) compound, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl, suspended in and containing immiscible aqueous phases. The outer and ... [more ▼]

We investigate dynamic director field variations in shells of the nematic liquid crystal (LC) compound, 4-cyano-4′-pentylbiphenyl, suspended in and containing immiscible aqueous phases. The outer and inner shell interfaces are stabilized by the cationic surfactant, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), and by the water soluble polymer, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), respectively. PVA and surfactant solutions normally promote tangential and orthogonal alignments, respectively, of the LC director. The rather high Krafft temperature of CTAB, TK ≈25 °C, means that its solubility in water is below the critical micelle concentration at room temperature in most labs. Here,we study the effect of cooling/heating past TK on the LC shell director configuration. Within a certain concentration range,CTAB in the outer aqueous phase (and PVA in the inner) switches the LC director field from hybrid to uniformly orthogonal upon cooling below TK. We argue that the effect is related to the migration of the surfactant through the fluid LC membraneinto the initially surfactant-free aqueous PVA solution, triggered by the drastically reduced water solubility of CTAB at T < TK.The results suggest that LC shells can detect solutes in the continuous phase, provided there is sufficient probability that thesolute migrates through the LC into the inner aqueous phase. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 140 (56 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailIsotropic–isotropic phase separation and spinodal decomposition in liquid crystal–solvent mixtures
Reyes, Catherine UL; Baller, Jörg UL; Araki, Takeaki et al

in Soft Matter (2019), 15

Phase separation in mixtures forming liquid crystal (LC) phases is an important yet under- appreciated phenomenon that can drastically influence the behaviour of a multi-component LC. Here we demonstrate ... [more ▼]

Phase separation in mixtures forming liquid crystal (LC) phases is an important yet under- appreciated phenomenon that can drastically influence the behaviour of a multi-component LC. Here we demonstrate, using polarising microscopy with active cooling as well as differential scanning calorimetry, that the phase diagram for mixtures of the LC-forming compound 4’-n- pentylbiphenyl-4-carbonitrile (5CB) with ethanol is surprisingly complex. Binary mixtures reveal a broad miscibility gap that leads to phase separation between two distinct isotropic phases via spinodal decomposition or nucleation and growth. On further cooling the nematic phase enters on the 5CB-rich side, adding to the complexity. Significantly, water contamination dramatically raises the temperature range of the miscibility gap, bringing up the critical temperature for spinodal de- composition from ∼ 2◦C for the anhydrous case to > 50◦C if just 3 vol.% water is added to the ethanol. We support the experiments with a theoretical treatment that qualitatively reproduces the phase diagrams as well as the transition dynamics, with and without water. Our study highlights the impact of phase separation in LC-forming mixtures, spanning from equilibrium coexistence of multiple liquid phases to non-equilibrium effects due to persistent spatial concentration gradients. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 157 (28 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLiquid crystal elastomer shell actuators with negative order parameter
Jampani, Venkata UL; Reguengo De Sousa, Kevin; Ferreira Machado, Joana et al

in Science Advances (2019), 5(4), 1

Liquid crystals (LCs) are nonsolids with long-range orientational order, described by a scalar order parameter ⟨P2⟩=1/2⟨3cos2β−1⟩. Despite the vast set of existing LC materials, one-third of the order ... [more ▼]

Liquid crystals (LCs) are nonsolids with long-range orientational order, described by a scalar order parameter ⟨P2⟩=1/2⟨3cos2β−1⟩. Despite the vast set of existing LC materials, one-third of the order parameter value range, −1/2< 〈P2〉 < 0, has until now been inaccessible. Here, we present the first material with negative LC order parameter in its ground state, in the form of elastomeric shells. The optical and actuation characteristics are opposite to those of conventional LC elastomers (LCEs). This novel class of anti-ordered elastomers gives access to the previously secluded range of liquid crystallinity with 〈P2〉 < 0, providing new challenges for soft matter physics and adding a complementary type of LCE actuator that is attractive for applications in, e.g., soft robotics [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 272 (19 UL)
See detailMicrofluidic Wet Spinning of Core-Sheath Elastomer-Liquid Crystal Fibers
Honaker, Lawrence William UL; Vats, Shameek UL; Anyfantakis, Emmanouil UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, March 29)

Liquid crystals encapsulated in fibers have a wide variety of applications in sensing. In order to produce these, several methods have been explored. Electrospinning is among the better-known techniques ... [more ▼]

Liquid crystals encapsulated in fibers have a wide variety of applications in sensing. In order to produce these, several methods have been explored. Electrospinning is among the better-known techniques with considerable successes. Only a limited range of polymers, though, has been used for electrospinning with liquid crystal cores, and the process of electrospinning has many obstacles to its utility at an industrial scale. On the other hand, wet-spinning techniques are better suited for industrial applications and are widely used in textile manufacturing, but are not commonly used for coaxial fiber production, especially with the large experimental scales that are difficult to replicate in a standard liquid crystal research laboratory. We therefore propose a method for wet-spinning coaxial core-sheath liquid crystal-filled elastomer fibers using a microfluidic set-up. Based on the flow-focusing method used for the production of liquid crystal shells and emulsions, this technique generates coaxial filaments by pumping a core-sheath flow of a liquid crystal surrounded by a rubbery polymer solution into a co-flowing coagulation bath. The coagulation bath is tuned to quickly extract the elastic polymer solution solvent, leaving behind a dry, continuous fiber. We have employed this method to produce fibers of polybutadiene and polyisoprene containing a core of a liquid crystal, such as 4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl (5CB). Investigations into the choice of polymer solution, i.e. both the polymer and solvents used, will be presented in addition to discussion on parameters affecting the contiguity of the core. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 284 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSub-second dynamic phototuning of alignment in azodendrimer-doped nematic liquid crystal shells
Noh, Junghyun UL; Jampani, Venkata UL; Haba, Osamu et al

in Journal of Molecular Liquids (2018), 267

The alignment of nematic liquid crystal 5CB in micron-thick shells, suspended in and containing aqueous liquid phases, can be rapidly switched between radial (homeotropic) and tangential (planar) director ... [more ▼]

The alignment of nematic liquid crystal 5CB in micron-thick shells, suspended in and containing aqueous liquid phases, can be rapidly switched between radial (homeotropic) and tangential (planar) director field by doping them with a photoresponsive dendrimer with multiple azobenzene moieties in the branches. The dendrimer spontaneously segregates to the inner as well as outer shell interfaces, folding into an amphiphilic conformation irrespective of the sign of interface curvature. The branches are directed into the liquid crystal, inducing a homeotropic ground state. Upon UV irradiation, the trans-cis isomerization of azobenzene triggers immediate switching to planar alignment. The very fast realignment and the simultaneous response throughout the shell leads to an initially random planar director field, with many topological defects of both positive and negative signs becoming visible within a second of irradiation. All but two +1 defects quickly annihilate, and the remaining defect pair moves up towards the thinnest part of the shell to form the planar steady state. By illuminating with visible light the homeotropic alignment is quickly recovered. By exchanging the solvent used for assisting the dendrimer dissolution, also dynamic phase separation phenomena can be studied in the shells, revealing that the dendrimer solubility in 5CB is greater in the UV-induced cis state than in the trans ground state. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 182 (41 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of head group and chain length of surfactants used for stabilising liquid crystal shells
Sharma, Anjali UL; Lagerwall, Jan UL

in Liquid Crystals (2018), 45(13-15), 2319-2328

We investigate the stability and textural development in nematic liquid crystal (LC) shells, with aqueous interior and exterior, as a function of the type and concentration of surfactant stabiliser of the ... [more ▼]

We investigate the stability and textural development in nematic liquid crystal (LC) shells, with aqueous interior and exterior, as a function of the type and concentration of surfactant stabiliser of the shell interfaces. The LC is the common thermotropic nematic 5CB and the surfactants are commercial, of cat- as well as of anionic type, with varying alkyl chain length. In addition to stabilising the shell interfaces, surfactants are generally assumed to promote radial (homeotropic) LC alignment, based on prior studies where the surfactant concentration was well above the critical micelle concentration (CMC). Here, we focus on the low-concentration range, below CMC. We find that both cat- and anionic surfactants can stabilise shells, although the higher water solubility of cationics can render stabilisation more difficult. We also conclude that surfactants do not necessarily impose homeotropic alignment; if the surfactant concentration is very low, the director may adopt planar alignment at the 5CB–water interface. Interestingly, the threshold concentration, where the surfactant takes control of alignment, is different for the shell inside and outside. Shells stabilised by solutions of surfactant with concentration near the threshold may therefore adopt a hybrid configuration, with homeotropic inside and planar outside. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 190 (34 UL)