References of "Laczny, Cedric Christian 50014453"
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See detailBioremediation of 27 Micropollutants by Symbiotic Microorganisms of Wetland Macrophytes
Brunhoferova, Hana UL; Venditti, Silvia UL; Laczny, Cedric Christian UL et al

in Sustainability (2022), 14(7), 3944

Background: Micropollutants in bodies of water represent many challenges. We addressedthese challenges by the application of constructed wetlands, which represent advanced treatmenttechnology for the ... [more ▼]

Background: Micropollutants in bodies of water represent many challenges. We addressedthese challenges by the application of constructed wetlands, which represent advanced treatmenttechnology for the removal of micropollutants from water. However, which mechanisms specificallycontribute to the removal efficiency often remains unclear. Methods: Here, we focus on the removalof 27 micropollutants by bioremediation. For this, macrophytesPhragmites australis,Iris pseudacorusandLythrum salicariawere taken from established wetlands, and a special experimental set-up wasdesigned. In order to better understand the impact of the rhizosphere microbiome, we determinedthe microbial composition using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and investigated the role of identifiedgenera in the micropollutant removal of micropollutants. Moreover, we studied the colonizationof macrophyte roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which are known for their symbiotic rela-tionship with plants. This symbiosis could result in increased removal of present micropollutants.Results: We foundIris pseudacorusto be the most successful bioremediative system, as it removed22 compounds, including persistent ones, with more than 80% efficiency. The most abundant generathat contributed to the removal of micropollutants werePseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Variovorax,Methylotenera, Reyranella, AmaricoccusandHydrogenophaga.Iris pseudacorusexhibited the highest colo-nization rate (56%). Conclusions: Our experiments demonstrate the positive impact of rhizospheremicroorganisms on the removal of micropollutants. [less ▲]

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See detailAn archaeal compound as a driver of Parkinson’s disease pathogenesis
Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Aho, Velma UL; Jäger, Christian UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2022)

Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit differences in their gut microbiomes compared to healthy individuals. Although differences have most commonly been described in the abundances of bacterial ... [more ▼]

Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit differences in their gut microbiomes compared to healthy individuals. Although differences have most commonly been described in the abundances of bacterial taxa, changes to viral and archaeal populations have also been observed. Mechanistic links between gut microbes and PD pathogenesis remain elusive but could involve molecules that promote α-synuclein aggregation. Here, we show that 2-hydroxypyridine (2-HP) represents a key molecule for the pathogenesis of PD. We observe significantly elevated 2-HP levels in faecal samples from patients with PD or its prodrome, idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder (iRBD), compared to healthy controls. 2-HP is correlated with the archaeal species Methanobrevibacter smithii and with genes involved in methane metabolism, and it is detectable in isolate cultures of M. smithii. We demonstrate that 2-HP is selectively toxic to transgenic α-synuclein overexpressing yeast and increases α-synuclein aggregation in a yeast model as well as in human induced pluripotent stem cell derived enteric neurons. It also exacerbates PD-related motor symptoms, α-synuclein aggregation, and striatal degeneration when injected intrastriatally in transgenic mice overexpressing human α-synuclein. Our results highlight the effect of an archaeal molecule in relation to the gut-brain axis, which is critical for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. [less ▲]

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See detailFunctional meta-omics provide critical insights into long- and short-read assemblies
Galata, Valentina UL; Busi, Susheel Bhanu UL; Kunath, Benoît UL et al

in Briefings in Bioinformatics (2021)

Real-world evaluations of metagenomic reconstructions are challenged by distinguishing reconstruction artifacts from genes and proteins present in situ. Here, we evaluate short-read-only, long-read-only ... [more ▼]

Real-world evaluations of metagenomic reconstructions are challenged by distinguishing reconstruction artifacts from genes and proteins present in situ. Here, we evaluate short-read-only, long-read-only and hybrid assembly approaches on four different metagenomic samples of varying complexity. We demonstrate how different assembly approaches affect gene and protein inference, which is particularly relevant for downstream functional analyses. For a human gut microbiome sample, we use complementary metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic data to assess the metagenomic data-based protein predictions. Our findings pave the way for critical assessments of metagenomic reconstructions. We propose a reference-independent solution, which exploits the synergistic effects of multi-omic data integration for the in situ study of microbiomes using long-read sequencing data. [less ▲]

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See detailPathoFact: a pipeline for the prediction of virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic data
de Nies, Laura UL; Lopes, Sara; Busi, Susheel Bhanu UL et al

in Microbiome (2021)

Background Pathogenic microorganisms cause disease by invading, colonizing, and damaging their host. Virulence factors including bacterial toxins contribute to pathogenicity. Additionally, antimicrobial ... [more ▼]

Background Pathogenic microorganisms cause disease by invading, colonizing, and damaging their host. Virulence factors including bacterial toxins contribute to pathogenicity. Additionally, antimicrobial resistance genes allow pathogens to evade otherwise curative treatments. To understand causal relationships between microbiome compositions, functioning, and disease, it is essential to identify virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance genes in situ. At present, there is a clear lack of computational approaches to simultaneously identify these factors in metagenomic datasets. Results Here, we present PathoFact, a tool for the contextualized prediction of virulence factors, bacterial toxins, and antimicrobial resistance genes with high accuracy (0.921, 0.832 and 0.979, respectively) and specificity (0.957, 0.989 and 0.994). We evaluate the performance of PathoFact on simulated metagenomic datasets and perform a comparison to two other general workflows for the analysis of metagenomic data. PathoFact outperforms all existing workflows in predicting virulence factors and toxin genes. It performs comparably to one pipeline regarding the prediction of antimicrobial resistance while outperforming the others. We further demonstrate the performance of PathoFact on three publicly available case-control metagenomic datasets representing an actual infection as well as chronic diseases in which either pathogenic potential or bacterial toxins are hypothesized to play a role. In each case, we identify virulence factors and AMR genes which differentiated between the case and control groups, thereby revealing novel gene associations with the studied diseases. Conclusion PathoFact is an easy-to-use, modular, and reproducible pipeline for the identification of virulence factors, bacterial toxins, and antimicrobial resistance genes in metagenomic data. Additionally, our tool combines the prediction of these pathogenicity factors with the identification of mobile genetic elements. This provides further depth to the analysis by considering the genomic context of the pertinent genes. Furthermore, PathoFact’s modules for virulence factors, toxins, and antimicrobial resistance genes can be applied independently, thereby making it a flexible and versatile tool. PathoFact, its models, and databases are freely available at https://pathofact.lcsb.uni.lu. [less ▲]

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See detailRoles of bacteriophages, plasmids and CRISPR immunity in microbial community dynamics revealed using time-series integrated meta-omics
Martinez Arbas, Susana UL; Narayanasamy, Shaman UL; Herold, Malte et al

in Nature Microbiology (2021), 6(1), 123--135

Viruses and plasmids (invasive mobile genetic elements (iMGEs)) have important roles in shaping microbial communities, but their dynamic interactions with CRISPR-based immunity remain unresolved. We ... [more ▼]

Viruses and plasmids (invasive mobile genetic elements (iMGEs)) have important roles in shaping microbial communities, but their dynamic interactions with CRISPR-based immunity remain unresolved. We analysed generation-resolved iMGE–host dynamics spanning one and a half years in a microbial consortium from a biological wastewater treatment plant using integrated meta-omics. We identified 31 bacterial metagenome-assembled genomes encoding complete CRISPR–Cas systems and their corresponding iMGEs. CRISPR-targeted plasmids outnumbered their bacteriophage counterparts by at least fivefold, highlighting the importance of CRISPR-mediated defence against plasmids. Linear modelling of our time-series data revealed that the variation in plasmid abundance over time explained more of the observed community dynamics than phages. Community-scale CRISPR-based plasmid–host and phage–host interaction networks revealed an increase in CRISPR-mediated interactions coinciding with a decrease in the dominant ‘Candidatus Microthrix parvicella’ population. Protospacers were enriched in sequences targeting genes involved in the transmission of iMGEs. Understanding the factors shaping the fitness of specific populations is necessary to devise control strategies for undesirable species and to predict or explain community-wide phenotypes. [less ▲]

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See detailDichloromethane Degradation Pathway from Unsequenced Hyphomicrobium sp. MC8b Rapidly Explored by Pan-Proteomics
Hayoun, Karim; Geersens, Emilie; Laczny, Cedric Christian UL et al

in Microorganisms (2020)

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See detailRoles of bacteriophages, plasmids and CRISPR immunity in microbial community dynamics revealed using time-series integrated meta-omics
Martinez Arbas, Susana UL; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Herold, Malte et al

in Nature Microbiology (2020)

Viruses and plasmids (invasive mobile genetic elements (iMGEs)) have important roles in shaping microbial communities, but their dynamic interactions with CRISPR-based immunity remain unresolved. We ... [more ▼]

Viruses and plasmids (invasive mobile genetic elements (iMGEs)) have important roles in shaping microbial communities, but their dynamic interactions with CRISPR-based immunity remain unresolved. We analysed generation-resolved iMGE–host dynamics spanning one and a half years in a microbial consortium from a biological wastewater treatment plant using integrated meta-omics. We identified 31 bacterial metagenome-assembled genomes encoding complete CRISPR–Cas systems and their corresponding iMGEs. CRISPR-targeted plasmids outnumbered their bacteriophage counterparts by at least fivefold, highlighting the importance of CRISPR-mediated defence against plasmids. Linear modelling of our time-series data revealed that the variation in plasmid abundance over time explained more of the observed community dynamics than phages. Community-scale CRISPR-based plasmid–host and phage–host interaction networks revealed an increase in CRISPR-mediated interactions coinciding with a decrease in the dominant ‘Candidatus Microthrix parvicella’ population. Protospacers were enriched in sequences targeting genes involved in the transmission of iMGEs. Understanding the factors shaping the fitness of specific populations is necessary to devise control strategies for undesirable species and to predict or explain community-wide phenotypes. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegration of time-series meta-omics data reveals how microbial ecosystems respond to disturbance
Herold, Malte; Martinez Arbas, Susana UL; Narayanasamy, Shaman et al

in Nature Communications (2020)

The development of reliable, mixed-culture biotechnological processes hinges on understanding how microbial ecosystems respond to disturbances. Here we reveal extensive phenotypic plasticity and niche ... [more ▼]

The development of reliable, mixed-culture biotechnological processes hinges on understanding how microbial ecosystems respond to disturbances. Here we reveal extensive phenotypic plasticity and niche complementarity in oleaginous microbial populations from a biological wastewater treatment plant. We perform meta-omics analyses (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics and metabolomics) on in situ samples over 14 months at weekly intervals. Based on 1,364 de novo metagenome-assembled genomes, we uncover four distinct fundamental niche types. Throughout the time-series, we observe a major, transient shift in community structure, coinciding with substrate availability changes. Functional omics data reveals extensive variation in gene expression and substrate usage amongst community members. Ex situ bioreactor experiments confirm that responses occur within five hours of a pulse disturbance, demonstrating rapid adaptation by specific populations. Our results show that community resistance and resilience are a function of phenotypic plasticity and niche complementarity, and set the foundation for future ecological engineering efforts. [less ▲]

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See detailA multi-omic view of invasive genetic elements and their linked prokaryotic population dynamics within a mixed microbial community
Martinez Arbas, Susana UL; Narayanasamy, Shaman; Herold, Malte et al

Poster (2018, September 11)

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See detailIntegrated time-resolved multi-omics for understanding microbial niche ecology
Herold, Malte UL; Narayanasamy, Shaman UL; Martinez Arbas, Susana UL et al

Poster (2018, August)

Microbial communities are strongly shaped by the niche breadths of their constituent populations. However, a detailed understanding of microbial niche ecology is typically lacking. Integrated multi-omic ... [more ▼]

Microbial communities are strongly shaped by the niche breadths of their constituent populations. However, a detailed understanding of microbial niche ecology is typically lacking. Integrated multi-omic analyses of host- or environment-derived samples offer the prospect of resolving fundamental and realised niches in situ. In turn, this is considered a prerequisite for niche engineering in order to drive an individual population or a community towards a specific phenotype, e.g., improvement of a biotechnological process. Here, we sampled floating islets on the surface of an activated sludge tank in a time-series spanning 51 time-points over 14 months. Multi-omics datasets (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, metaproteomics, and (meta-)metabolomics) were generated for all time-points. Leveraging nucleotide sequencing data, we analyzed the community structure and reconstructed genomes for specific populations of interest. Moreover, based on their metabolic potential, three major groups emerged, serving as proxies for their respective fundamental niches . Time-resolved linkage of the proteomic and transcriptomic data to the reconstructed genomes revealed a fine-grained picture of niche realization. In particular, environmental factors (temperature, metabolites, oxygen) were significantly associated with gene expression of individual populations. Furthermore, we subjected the community to controlled oxygen conditions (stable or dynamic) in a bioreactor experiment and measured the transcriptomic response. Our results suggest short-term adaptations of populations of interest with respect to lipid metabolism, among other pathways. In conclusion, our work demonstrates how longitudinal multi-omic datasets can be integrated in order to further our understanding of microbial niche ecology within a biotechnological process with potential applications beyond waste water treatment. [less ▲]

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See detailFirst draft genome sequence of a strain belonging to the Zoogloea genus and its gene expression in situ
Muller, Emilie UL; Narayanasamy, Shaman UL; Zeimes, Myriam et al

in Standards in Genomic Sciences (2017), 12(64),

The Gram-negative beta-proteobacterium Zoogloea sp. LCSB751 (LMG 29444) was newly isolated from foaming activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Here, we describe its draft genome ... [more ▼]

The Gram-negative beta-proteobacterium Zoogloea sp. LCSB751 (LMG 29444) was newly isolated from foaming activated sludge of a municipal wastewater treatment plant. Here, we describe its draft genome sequence and annotation together with a general physiological and genomic analysis, as the first sequenced representative of the Zoogloea genus. Moreover, Zoogloea sp. gene expression in its environment is described using metatranscriptomic data obtained from the same treatment plant. The presented genomic and transcriptomic information demonstrate a pronounced capacity of this genus to synthesize poly-β-hydroxyalkanoate within wastewater. [less ▲]

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See detailColonization and Succession within the Human Gut Microbiome by Archaea, Bacteria, and Microeukaryotes during the First Year of Life
Wampach, Linda UL; Heintz, Anna UL; Hogan, Angela et al

in Frontiers in Microbiology (2017)

Perturbations to the colonization process of the human gastrointestinal tract have been suggested to result in adverse health effects later in life. Although much research has been performed on bacterial ... [more ▼]

Perturbations to the colonization process of the human gastrointestinal tract have been suggested to result in adverse health effects later in life. Although much research has been performed on bacterial colonization and succession, much less is known about the other two domains of life, archaea, and eukaryotes. Here we describe colonization and succession by bacteria, archaea and microeukaryotes during the first year of life (samples collected around days 1, 3, 5, 28, 150, and 365) within the gastrointestinal tract of infants delivered either vaginally or by cesarean section and using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR as well as 16S and 18S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. Sequences from organisms belonging to all three domains of life were detectable in all of the collected meconium samples. The microeukaryotic community composition fluctuated strongly over time and early diversification was delayed in infants receiving formula milk. Cesarean section-delivered (CSD) infants experienced a delay in colonization and succession, which was observed for all three domains of life. Shifts in prokaryotic succession in CSD infants compared to vaginally delivered (VD) infants were apparent as early as days 3 and 5, which were characterized by increased relative abundances of the genera Streptococcus and Staphylococcus, and a decrease in relative abundance for the genera Bifidobacterium and Bacteroides. Generally, a depletion in Bacteroidetes was detected as early as day 5 postpartum in CSD infants, causing a significantly increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio between days 5 and 150 when compared to VD infants. Although the delivery mode appeared to have the strongest influence on differences between the infants, other factors such as a younger gestational age or maternal antibiotics intake likely contributed to the observed patterns as well. Our findings complement previous observations of a delay in colonization and succession of CSD infants, which affects not only bacteria but also archaea and microeukaryotes. This further highlights the need for resolving bacterial, archaeal, and microeukaryotic dynamics in future longitudinal studies of microbial colonization and succession within the neonatal gastrointestinal tract. [less ▲]

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See detailIMP: a pipeline for reproducible referenceindependent integrated metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses
Narayanasamy, Shaman UL; Jarosz, Yohan UL; Muller, Emilie UL et al

in Genome Biology (2016), 17

Existing workflows for the analysis of multi-omic microbiome datasets are lab-specific and often result in sub-optimal data usage. Here we present IMP, a reproducible and modular pipeline for the ... [more ▼]

Existing workflows for the analysis of multi-omic microbiome datasets are lab-specific and often result in sub-optimal data usage. Here we present IMP, a reproducible and modular pipeline for the integrated and reference-independent analysis of coupled metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data. IMP incorporates robust read preprocessing, iterative co-assembly, analyses of microbial community structure and function, automated binning, as well as genomic signature-based visualizations. The IMP-based data integration strategy enhances data usage, output volume, and output quality as demonstrated using relevant use-cases. Finally, IMP is encapsulated within a user-friendly implementation using Python and Docker. IMP is available at http://r3lab.uni.lu/web/imp/ (MIT license). [less ▲]

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See detailIdentification, recovery, and refinement of hitherto undescribed population-level genomes from the human gastrointestinal tract
Laczny, Cedric Christian UL; Muller, Emilie UL; Heintz, Anna UL et al

in Frontiers in Microbiology (2016), 7(884),

Linking taxonomic identity and functional potential at the population-level is important for the study of mixed microbial communities and is greatly facilitated by the availability of microbial reference ... [more ▼]

Linking taxonomic identity and functional potential at the population-level is important for the study of mixed microbial communities and is greatly facilitated by the availability of microbial reference genomes. While the culture-independent recovery of population-level genomes from environmental samples using the binning of metagenomic data has expanded available reference genome catalogs, several microbial lineages remain underrepresented. Here, we present two reference-independent approaches for the identification, recovery, and refinement of hitherto undescribed population-level genomes. The first approach is aimed at genome recovery of varied taxa and involves multi-sample automated binning using CANOPY CLUSTERING complemented by visualization and human-augmented binning using VIZBINpost hoc. The second approach is particularly well-suited for the study of specific taxa and employs VIZBINde novo. Using these approaches, we reconstructed a total of six population-level genomes of distinct and divergent representatives of the Alphaproteobacteria class, the Mollicutes class, the Clostridiales order, and the Melainabacteria class from human gastrointestinal tract-derived metagenomic data. Our results demonstrate that, while automated binning approaches provide great potential for large-scale studies of mixed microbial communities, these approaches should be complemented with informative visualizations because expert-driven inspection and refinements are critical for the recovery of high-quality population-level genomes. [less ▲]

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See detailVISUALISATION AND BINNING OF METAGENOMIC DATA
Laczny, Cedric Christian UL

Doctoral thesis (2015)

Metagenomic sequencing and assembly have become important approaches for the in situ characterisation of mixed microbial communities. Nevertheless, the data are typically fragmented and disconnected. The ... [more ▼]

Metagenomic sequencing and assembly have become important approaches for the in situ characterisation of mixed microbial communities. Nevertheless, the data are typically fragmented and disconnected. The binning of individual sequence fragments into population-level genomic complements promotes the population-resolved synchronous study of community composition and functional potential. However, current binning approaches require a priori knowledge, scale poorly to larger datasets, or exclude human input. In this work, a reference-independent approach for the visualisation and subsequent human-augmented binning of metagenomic sequence fragments, represented by their high-dimensional, oligonucleotide frequency-based signatures, is introduced. Due to the efficient and faithful representation of high-dimensional cluster structures in low-dimensional space, the described methodology facilitates the exploration and analysis of large datasets by a human user. Subsequently, a stand-alone software implementation, VizBin, is developed and described. This graphical user interface-based tool is designed to allow a user-friendly application of the herein introduced approach without the requirement of a bioinformatical background, special training, or exceptional computing resources. Following the software development, VizBin was applied for the analysis of human gastrointestinal tract-derived metagenomic sequencing data. This allowed the recovery of six virtually complete or partial genomes of hitherto uncharacterised and deeply branching microbial populations from four taxa including a potential butyrate-producing taxon. In summary, this work illustrates how improved recovery of population-level microbial genomes is achieved by reference-independent binning of assembled metagenomic sequencing data using human input. The broad applicability and robustness of the herein introduced approach is furthermore demonstrated by using VizBin for the visualisation of state-of-the-art long read-sequencing data. Despite the increased sequence error rate of this emerging type of sequencing data, pertinent cluster structures are revealed thus motivating the development of future read-level binning approaches. Targeted wet-lab validation of in silico recovered population-level genomes and comprehensive population-resolved analysis of microbial consortia in situ are key to advancing our knowledge and understanding of microbiota in different environments. [less ▲]

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