References of "Krueger, Robert"
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See detailDiverse alternatives empirical evidence from German speaking scholarship
Schulz, Christian UL; Krueger, Robert

in Local Environment (2018), 23(7), 675-679

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See detailMarket Rulers: Interpretive institutionalism and market-based sustainability
Carr, Constance UL; Gibbs, David; Krueger, Robert

Presentation (2013, April)

This paper examines market based urban sustainability policy through the lens of interpretive institutionalism. Interpretive institutionalism, an approach that emerged in British political science and has ... [more ▼]

This paper examines market based urban sustainability policy through the lens of interpretive institutionalism. Interpretive institutionalism, an approach that emerged in British political science and has been applied to geographical analyses of governance (c.f. Bevir and Rhodes 2006; Krueger and Gibbs 2010; Krueger and Gibbs 2012), is an analysis of how institution are created, sustained or modified through the ideas and actions of individuals’ (Bevir and Rhodes, 1999: 225). The actions of individuals are therefore not governed by their institutional position or institutional rules; rather, ‘how meanings and actions, are created, recreated and changed in ways that produce and transform institutions’ (Bevir, 2003: 460). Interpretive institutionalism views institutions like economic actors or firms: as creations of broader social processes, as well as the agency of actors working to construct them and act through them. Institutions can be seen not only as administrative and political organizations, but also as ‘the rules, norms and practices, which structure areas of social endeavour’ (Coaffee and Healey, 2003: 1982). Hence, ‘institutional rules may be consciously designed and clearly specified (as in structural plans and operating procedures) or take the form of unwritten customs and conventions’ (Lowndes and Wilson, 2001: 632). This paper examines how such rules are made under ‘market-based’ conditions to urban sustainable development: so-called ‘New Urbanism’ or ‘Smart Growth’ in the US. Here we examine how actors shape and reshape what the positivist social sciences consider ontologically fixed relationships. We explore these policies in three contexts: the US, England, and Luxembourg. This comparative approach enables us to understand how these policies travel across space and are re-embedded in place, and thus to move beyond the particular case study to understand how actors intervene in markets in new and interesting ways. [less ▲]

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See detailMobilizing Sustainability, Fixing Competitiveness: An examination of policy mobility Lux-embourg
Carr, Constance UL; Krueger, Robert; Hesse, Markus UL et al

Presentation (2011, November)

The movement of policies across space, often referred to as policy mobility, has been a vibrant area of discussion in the geographical literature in recent years (c.f. McCann 2011; González 2010; Larner ... [more ▼]

The movement of policies across space, often referred to as policy mobility, has been a vibrant area of discussion in the geographical literature in recent years (c.f. McCann 2011; González 2010; Larner and Laurie 2010; Peck and Theodore 2010; Ward 2006; Peck 2002). In particular, scholars have brought forth geographical concepts of relationality and territoriality, along with post-structural accounts of the social construction of knowledge and power, to provide sophisticated and complex accounts of the spatial flows of urban policies and their contingent ‘local’ expressions. In the tradition of urban geography and analysis, mobility stories tend to come from paradigmatic cases, such as Barcelona, Vancouver, New York and others. This paper brings to this conversation a policy mobility story from the rather specific, non-paradigmatic case of Luxembourg. In recent years Luxembourg’s welfare state has developed spatial development policies embedded in the rhetoric and practice of sustainability in an attempt to counteract the contradictions of the State’s rapid development. Much of this policy account emerged from the transfer of ideas and practices from neighboring countries and the European Union. While certainly similar to other new economy spaces in terms of tensions, Luxembourg’s unique system of governance and social and cultural context may yield new insights into the policy mobility literature. The paper thus seeks to contribute to the policy mobility literature by bringing into the fold a case study from a somewhat unique urban context, Luxembourg, concerning the under-explored area of policy mobility domain, urban sustainable development. We hypothesize that Luxembourg’s specific urban policy context could reveal limitations of current approaches. Further, by focusing on sustainability as a policy ‘fix’ for spatial planning, we expect to capture additional nuance of the politics of capital accumulation in a highly fragmented, increasingly relational urban and regional setting. [less ▲]

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See detailExamining Sustainable Spatial Development in Luxembourg
Carr, Constance UL; Krueger, Robert

Presentation (2011, May)

As founding member of several European and international institutions (EU, OECD, NATO, UN), host to several institutions of the European Union (Parliament Secretariat, Court of Justice, the European ... [more ▼]

As founding member of several European and international institutions (EU, OECD, NATO, UN), host to several institutions of the European Union (Parliament Secretariat, Court of Justice, the European Investment Bank), and ranked 16th among global financial centers (City of London 2010), Luxembourg’s smallness is enigmatic, but also offers a unique opportunity to study global processes operating within a small frame. This paper presents progress achieved in, and collaborative to, the SUSTAINLUX research project, funded by the Fonds National de la Recherche Luxembourg and the Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Unlike its neighbouring nations, Luxembourg seems only just entering a post-flexible era (if at all). The financial ruptures since 2008 have had relatively little impact, and as such, Luxembourg grapples with spatial structural changes associated with its post-industrial and prospering tertiary economy. Its comparably young sustainable development policy is primarily challenged by recent demographic changes, and its geographical specificity. Of its 503,000 residents, roughly 200,000 are landed immigrants. On each working day, the nation’s population increases circa 50% as workers from neighbouring nations enter the country and commute to work. Each day, the City of Luxembourg’s population doubles in size – and its nodal position at the crossroads that lead to Cologne, Paris, and Brussels, is continually strengthening in importance. Concurrent pressures on the real estate market rates pose a real barrier to settlement within or near the capital city (Becker and Hesse 2010). There are thus strong impacts at the local level with high pressure on the provision of housing and transportation infrastructure, which result in conflicting trajectories in terms of sustainable land-use. The fields of housing policy and mobility are thus promising case studies towards a more thorough analysis of the significance, policy relevance, barriers, and shortcomings of sustainable spatial development strategies. The research aims at critically examining the approach of sustainable development, in the context of Luxembourg’s urban and regional transformations and corresponding governance structures (Carr, Hesse and Schulz 2010). While city planners are confronted with finding ways to manage growth, the normative of sustainable development permeates all levels of planning. The first part of this paper will map the literature and discourse on sustainable development in Luxembourg, and summarize the role and limitations of this normative discourse in its social spatial transformation. The second part of this paper will introduce the research agenda of Prof. Krueger, who will pursue research collaborative to SUSTAINLUX, adding a comparative dimension to the study. He will describe his aims to: 1) understand the institutional milieu of sustainability governance in Luxembourg and how it compares internationally; 2) develop an understanding of how actors work and how these practices reproduce certain outcomes; 3) understand how actors’ perceptions affect the form and function of sustainability governance; and 4) assemble the data from aims 1-3 to develop a triangulated analysis of institutional change that is both actor-centric and sensitive to the contextual constraints of the system. This comparative approach will be of interest to social scientists who study how actors understand and shape their policy milieus in different political and geographical contexts, in relation to sustainability. References Becker, T. and Hesse. 2010. “Internationalisierung und Steuer metropolitaner Wohnungsmärkte – Das Beispiel Luxemburg” Information zur Raumentwicklung.“ 5: 403-415. Carr, C., Hesse, M., and Schulz, C. 2010. „Sustainable Spatial Development in Luxembourg (SUSTAINLUX)” Funded by FNR (CO9/SR/01), Working Paper 1, Laboratoire de Géographie et Aménagement du Territoire City of London (2010) “Global Financial Centres 7.“ City of London. Krueger R. & D. Gibbs. 2007. (ed.), “The Sustainable Development Paradox: Urban Political Economy in the United States and Europe.” New York: The Guilford Press. [less ▲]

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