References of "Kremer, J R"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDetection of Differentially Modified Pathogen Proteins by Western Blot after 2D Gel Electrophoresis and Identification by MALDI-TOF/TOF
Fack, F; Kessler, Julia UL; Pirrotte, P et al

in Stulik, J; Toman, R; Butaye, P (Eds.) et al BSL3 and BSL4 agents : proteomics, glycomics, and antigenicity (2011)

The detection of proteomic changes after viral infection, especially those which are due to post-translational modifications of host and pathogen proteins is of particular importance for the understanding ... [more ▼]

The detection of proteomic changes after viral infection, especially those which are due to post-translational modifications of host and pathogen proteins is of particular importance for the understanding of the fast interplay between pathogen and host components in viral infections. The characterization of modified isoforms of such proteins can benefit considerably from the combination of fluorescence labelled monospecific antibodies and 2D-DIGE differential proteomic studies. The potential of this approach is illustrated with a study of essential proteins in a measles virus-host cell system using small 2D gels and low sample amounts. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 212 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGenetic variability and mRNA editing frequencies of the phosphoprotein genes of wild-type measles viruses.
Bankamp, B.; Lopareva, E. N.; Kremer, J. R. et al

in Virus Research (2008), 135(2), 298-306

The sequences of the nucleoprotein (N) and hemagglutinin (H) genes are routinely used for molecular epidemiologic studies of measles virus (MV). However, the amount of genetic diversity contained in other ... [more ▼]

The sequences of the nucleoprotein (N) and hemagglutinin (H) genes are routinely used for molecular epidemiologic studies of measles virus (MV). However, the amount of genetic diversity contained in other genes of MV has not been thoroughly evaluated. In this report, the nucleotide sequences of the phosphoprotein (P) genes from 34 wild-type strains representing 15 genotypes of MV were analyzed and found to be almost as variable as the H genes but less variable than the N genes. Deduced amino acid sequences of the three proteins encoded by the P gene, P, V and C, demonstrated considerably higher variability than the H proteins. Phylogenetic analysis showed the same tree topography for the P gene sequences as previously seen for the N and H genes. RNA editing of P gene transcripts affects the relative ratios of P and V proteins, which may have consequences for pathogenicity. Wild-type isolates produced more transcripts with more than one G insertion; however, there was no significant difference in the use of P and V open reading frames, suggesting that the relative amounts of P and V proteins in infected cells would be similar for both vaccine and wild-type strains. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 114 (1 UL)