References of "Kracheel, Martin 50002129"
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See detailChanging Commuter Behaviour through Gamification
Kracheel, Martin UL

Doctoral thesis (2016)

This thesis explores how the dynamic context of mobility, more specifically the commute to and from work in the region of Luxembourg, can be changed through gamified mobile applications. The goal is to ... [more ▼]

This thesis explores how the dynamic context of mobility, more specifically the commute to and from work in the region of Luxembourg, can be changed through gamified mobile applications. The goal is to get a better understanding of the innovative application area of gamified mobility and its potential, as well as to describe its implications for research and practice. This applied research is inspired by a participatory design approach, where information is gained by adopting a user perspective and through the process of conceptualising and applying methods in empirical studies. The four empirical studies described in this thesis employed a mixed-methodology approach consisting of focus group interviews, questionnaires and mobile applications. Within these studies four prototypes were developed and tested, namely Coffee Games, Driver Diaries, Commutastic and Leave Now. The studies show concrete possibilities and difficulties in the interdisciplinary field of gamifying mobility behaviour. This dissertation is composed of seven chapters: Chapter I introduces the topics mobility, games and behaviour; Chapter II presents a proof of concept study (Using Gamification and Metaphor to Design a Mobility Platform for Commuters); Chapter III explains the development and validation of a mobility research tool (Driver Diaries: a Multimodal Mobility Behaviour Logging Methodology); Chapter IV describes the development of a new gamified mobility application and its evaluation (Studying Commuter Behaviour for Gamifying Mobility); Chapter V provides an empirical assessment of the relevance of gamification and incentives for the evaluation of a mobile application (Changing Mobility Behaviour through Recommendations) and Chapter VI is a summary on how to change mobility behaviour through a multilevel design approach (Using Gamification to change Mobility Behaviour: Lessons Learned from two Approaches). The four prototypes help to address the primary goal of this thesis, which is to contribute to new approaches to urban mobility by exploring gamified mobility applications. Coffee games is a proof of concept, low-fidelity implementation of a real-life game that tests gamification elements and incentives for changing indoor-mobility behaviour. The findings of two iterations with a total of 19 participants show the adaptability of the concept to different contexts. The approach to change indoor-mobility behaviour with this mock-up game was successful. Driver Diaries is a methodology to assess mobility behaviour in Luxembourg. The aim with this mobile, digital travel diary is to study features of cross-border commuter mobility and activities in Luxembourg in order to identify suitable elements (activities etc.) for a gamified mobility application, such as Commutastic. After two rounds of data collection (Android and iOS) the records of 187 participants were analysed and the results illustrate the mobility habits of the target audience. Commutastic is a mobility game application that motivates users to avoid peak-hour traffic by proposing alternative after work activities. Analysing the data of 90 participants, we find that the timely offer of an activity in the proximity along with gamification elements involves users and motivates a third of them to engage in alternative mobility behaviours. Leave Now is a gamified recommendation application, which rewards users for leaving their workplace outside of their usual schedule and explores the role of specific gamification elements on user motivation. The study, which was conducted with 19 participants, shows differences between an individual play and a group play condition regarding leaving time changes. The contributions of this thesis to gamification and mobility research and practice span from mobility participations as a game and integral part of our everyday life to methodologies of its successful implementation in the Luxemburgish context. The results show the advantages, disadvantages, and restrictions of gamification in urban mobility contexts. This is an important step towards gamifying mobility behaviour change and therefore towards research aiming at a wellbeing in a better urban life. [less ▲]

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See detailPlaying with Traffic: An Emerging Methodology for Developing Gamified Mobility Applications
Kracheel, Martin UL; Mccall, Roderick UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Lumsden, Joanna (Ed.) Emerging Perspectives on the Design, Use, and Evaluation of Mobile and Handheld Devices (2015)

This chapter explores a novel methodology used to develop gamified mobility applications for a heavily congested European city. The methodology consists of three elements: a metaphorical traffic game, a ... [more ▼]

This chapter explores a novel methodology used to develop gamified mobility applications for a heavily congested European city. The methodology consists of three elements: a metaphorical traffic game, a complex and comprehensive mobility logging approach and two focus groups. The daily commute is explained as part of a real life traffic game that changes user behaviour. The methodology allows for the identification of travel activity patterns and attitudes that in turn can be used to develop gamified mobility applications. The chapter provides concrete game elements and design considerations that can be used to improve the traffic experience in Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detail“And? Did we do nice things?”: Children documenting their emerging inquiries in early science learning
Max, Charles UL; Siry, Christina UL; Kracheel, Martin UL

in Milne, Catherine; Tobin, Kenneth (Eds.) Sociocultural studies and implications for science education: the experiential and the virtual (2015)

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See detailA Wearable Revolution: Is the smartwatch the next small big thing?
Kracheel, Martin UL; Bronzi, Walter UL; Kazemi, Hamed

Article for general public (2014)

Smartwatches have the potential to enhance our digital lifestyle, but are not yet a part of our digital lifestyle. When big competitors overcome smartwatches usability challenges and design limitations ... [more ▼]

Smartwatches have the potential to enhance our digital lifestyle, but are not yet a part of our digital lifestyle. When big competitors overcome smartwatches usability challenges and design limitations, this could change rapidly. The smartwatch, to be successful, has to combine two requirements: provide digital information and individual expression presented by traditional watches. The smartwatch can excel in a new category of "smart" devices to be used instead of our smartphones for simplifying and speeding up activities such as reading a message, checking the weather, traffic directions or your agenda. The support from the community of developers will play a major role in deciding which platform will progress further. [less ▲]

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See detailIncentives and gaming environments for changing commuter behaviour
Kracheel, Martin UL; McCall, Roderick UL; Koenig, Vincent UL et al

Scientific Conference (2014, September 30)

The project aims to produce a pervasive, gamified system that tries to incentivize mobility behaviour change by offering alternative activities in contrast to usual journeys in such way that it will ... [more ▼]

The project aims to produce a pervasive, gamified system that tries to incentivize mobility behaviour change by offering alternative activities in contrast to usual journeys in such way that it will reduce traffic, emissions and, in the end, save money. The alternatives, for example, such as taking different modes of transport, are incentivised through gamification. In order to develop this pervasive system, we analysed existing mobility patterns of commuters in Luxembourg. The methodology that we developed consists of a questionnaire, a smartphone application and focus group interviews. This paper presents the findings of the questionnaire and how they influence the design of the gamified pervasive application. [less ▲]

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See detailSTUDYING COMMUTER BEHAVIOUR FOR GAMIFYING MOBILITY
Kracheel, Martin UL; McCall, Roderick UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

Presentation (2014, September 30)

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See detailDriver diaries: a multimodal mobility behaviour logging methodology
Kracheel, Martin UL; McCall, Roderick UL; Koenig, Vincent UL et al

in Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (2013, October)

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See detailGamification as a Methodology: A Multi-Part Development Process
McCall, Roderick UL; Louveton, Nicolas UL; Kracheel, Martin UL et al

Scientific Conference (2013, April 28)

Gamification is often thought of as the end result or outcome of a project. In this paper we explore how it can also be adopted during the conceptual design stage using metaphorical games and as a method ... [more ▼]

Gamification is often thought of as the end result or outcome of a project. In this paper we explore how it can also be adopted during the conceptual design stage using metaphorical games and as a method of testing concepts within a more advanced simulation environment. We explore this from the perspective of the I-GEAR project where it is used as one of many methods in the design of a commuter mobility game. [less ▲]

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See detailTracing science in the early childhood classroom: the historicity of multi-resourced discourse practices in multilingual interaction
Max, Charles UL; Ziegler, Gudrun UL; Kracheel, Martin UL

in Mansour, Nasser; Wegerif, Rupert (Eds.) Science Education for Diversity, Theory and Practice (2012)

This chapter presents research conducted in early childhood classrooms in Luxembourg, a European country with a complex multilingual situation. A multi-layered corpus of classroom interactions, consisting ... [more ▼]

This chapter presents research conducted in early childhood classrooms in Luxembourg, a European country with a complex multilingual situation. A multi-layered corpus of classroom interactions, consisting of photos, videos and audio recordings, was collected over a period of 6 months and then classified, annotated and partially transcribed. Drawing from this corpus, this study sheds light on the discursive practices of 6-12 year old children and examines the co-construction of the children’s growing understandings of science in collaborative inquiries. Arguing from a context-sensitive perspective, our research approaches the learning of science as an interactional achievement in situ, one that encompasses the enactment of science as shared discourse and therefore as a cultural accomplishment. [less ▲]

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See detailUsing Gamification and Metaphor to Design a Mobility Platform for Commuters
McCall, Roderick UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Kracheel, Martin UL

in International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction (2012)

In this paper the authors explain the use of gamification as a way to optimize mobility patterns within a heav- ily congested European City. They explore this from two perspectives, first by outlining a ... [more ▼]

In this paper the authors explain the use of gamification as a way to optimize mobility patterns within a heav- ily congested European City. They explore this from two perspectives, first by outlining a gaming concept and secondly by explaining how the use of a mobility game that took place in two locations can be used to explore incentives and design issues. [less ▲]

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See detailReducing congestion through persuasive gaming
McCall, Roderick UL; Kracheel, Martin UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

Scientific Conference (2012)

In this paper we provide an overview of the I-GEAR (incentives and gaming environments for automobile routing) project that is intended to reduce traffic congestion in Luxembourg through the use of ... [more ▼]

In this paper we provide an overview of the I-GEAR (incentives and gaming environments for automobile routing) project that is intended to reduce traffic congestion in Luxembourg through the use of persuasive gaming. In order to illustrate some of the issues involved we also present an outline concept of a live game in which we propose to encourage the workshop participants to take part. If a sufficient number of workshop participants take part, this real life game could even be used as a small scale study within the project. [less ▲]

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See detailTowards a Simple City Driving Simulator Based on Speed Dreams and OSM
Avanesov, Tigran UL; Louveton, Nicolas UL; McCall, Roderick UL et al

in Adjunct Proceedings of 4th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (2012), 2

This paper presents an architecture and partially built simulation platform which is designed to offer a flexible open ended approach for conducting laboratory experiments. The emphasis is on supporting ... [more ▼]

This paper presents an architecture and partially built simulation platform which is designed to offer a flexible open ended approach for conducting laboratory experiments. The emphasis is on supporting multiple drivers and the ability to swap in and out different software components and devices. [less ▲]

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See detailCritical interaction instances in collaborative concurrent engineering
Song, Ju-Youn UL; Kracheel, Martin UL; Ziegler, Gudrun UL et al

in Thoben, Klaus-Dieter (Ed.) Proceedings of the 2011 17th International Conference on Concurrent Enterprising (ICE 2011) (2011)

Previous studies have defined people, process, tools and technology as relevant elements for Concurrent Engineering (CE) processes. This study analyzes the principles of dynamic interrelation between ... [more ▼]

Previous studies have defined people, process, tools and technology as relevant elements for Concurrent Engineering (CE) processes. This study analyzes the principles of dynamic interrelation between these elements in the process of developing a satellite (mission), depending on collaborative working interactions. The participants in a CE facility work in parallel, exchanging their knowledge and information, using their set-up tools acting according to the requirements of their disciplinary specialities and the task at hand in the CE process. We analyze the collaborative working context in the CE facility, where compelling moments emerge, that require the different disciplinary positions in the CE facility to engage in negotiations by moving into shared spaces in order to solve the issues at stake. In line with interactional design studies, we identify particular moments in the interaction as "Critical Interaction Instances"(CIIs). CIIs have two criteria, first the awareness of an existing problem. Second the repositioning of the participants in the CE facility which correlates with the shared spaces that the collaboration creates. The results of this study demonstrate that CIIs enhance the collaboration (quality) throughout the CE process. Based on data collected in a CE facility in Germany the study shows how CIIs emerge, unfold and mark collaborative interaction in CE. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (9 UL)