References of "Koenig, Vincent 50002114"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailKnowledge assessment with concept maps: Opportunities and challenges
Rohles, Björn UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July)

21st-century digital society poses tremendous challenges for education and assessment. Learners have to understand the complex relations between diverse topics and learn how to learn their entire lives ... [more ▼]

21st-century digital society poses tremendous challenges for education and assessment. Learners have to understand the complex relations between diverse topics and learn how to learn their entire lives. Concept mapping is a promising approach to address these issues. It is a method that uses concepts connected by labeled links to visualize a semantic network of knowledge. Concept mapping is predestined for a digital approach because it allows for easy interactive editing, innovative test items, and incorporation of multimodal information. Concept mapping is available for summative and formative assessment and, thus, provides the opportunity to become a vital part of modern education. The biggest advantage of concept mapping (i.e., a comprehensive and yet comprehensible visualization of complex relations) also represents the biggest challenge when it comes to assessment with - and scoring of - concept maps. The first challenge is the enormous amount of indicators used for scoring concept maps in assessment. A second challenge comes from the fact that educators using concept mapping in their assessment have to understand and interpret the indicators that are used in scoring concept maps. This presentation reports on a Ph.D. project that investigates digital concept mapping in the context of knowledge assessment from a user experience perspective. The results are based on, first, a comprehensive international systematic literature review on concept map scoring, and second, three empirical studies covering the needs and experiences of learners and educators in concept mapping. It presents key findings from the iterative user experience design of a concept mapping tool as part of the online assessment platform OASYS, an overview of indicators used in concept map scoring, and research opportunities in knowledge assessment with concept maps. Finally, it stresses the value that user experience design brings to knowledge assessment with concept maps. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 112 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail"I am definitely manipulated, even when I am aware of it. It’s ridiculous!" - Dark Patterns from the End-User Perspective
Bongard-Blanchy, Kerstin UL; Rossi, Arianna UL; Rivas, Salvador UL et al

in Proceedings of ACM DIS Conference on Designing Interactive Systems (2021)

Online services pervasively employ manipulative designs (i.e., dark patterns) to influence users to purchase goods and subscriptions, spend more time on-site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their ... [more ▼]

Online services pervasively employ manipulative designs (i.e., dark patterns) to influence users to purchase goods and subscriptions, spend more time on-site, or mindlessly accept the harvesting of their personal data. To protect users from the lure of such designs, we asked: are users aware of the presence of dark patterns? If so, are they able to resist them? By surveying 406 individuals, we found that they are generally aware of the influence that manipulative designs can exert on their online behaviour. However, being aware does not equip users with the ability to oppose such influence. We further find that respondents, especially younger ones, often recognise the "darkness" of certain designs, but remain unsure of the actual harm they may suffer. Finally, we discuss a set of interventions (e.g., bright patterns, design frictions, training games, applications to expedite legal enforcement) in the light of our findings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail"I Personally Relate It to the Traffic Light": A User Study on Security & Privacy Indicators in a Secure Email System Committed to Privacy by Default
Stojkovski, Borce UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Proceedings of the 36th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing (2021)

Improving the usability and adoption of secure (i.e. end-to-end encrypted) email systems has been a notorious challenge for over two decades. One of the open questions concerns the amount and format of ... [more ▼]

Improving the usability and adoption of secure (i.e. end-to-end encrypted) email systems has been a notorious challenge for over two decades. One of the open questions concerns the amount and format of information that should be communicated to users to inform them of the security and privacy properties with respect to different messages or correspondents. Contributing to the ongoing discussion on the usability and effectiveness of security and privacy indicators, particularly in the context of systems targeting non-expert users, this paper sheds light on users' evaluation of traffic light-inspired indicators, as a metaphor to represent different privacy states and guarantees, provided by a new system for email end-to-end encryption called p≡p. Using a mixed-methods approach, based on input gathered from 150 participants in three online studies, we highlight the pros and cons of the traffic light semantic in p≡p's context and beyond, and discuss the potential implications on the perceived security and use of such systems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 260 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExperimenter Effects in Children Using the Smileyometer Scale
Lehnert, Florence Kristin UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 19)

Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these ... [more ▼]

Researchers in the social sciences like human-computer interaction face novel challenges concerning the development of methods and tools for evaluating interactive technology with children. One of these challenges is related to the validity and reliability of user experience measurement tools. Scale designs, like the Smileyometer, have been proven to contain biases such as the tendency for children to rate almost every technology as great. This explorative paper discusses a possible effect of two experimenter styles on the distribution of 6-8 years old pupils' ratings (N= 73) to the Smileyometer. We administered the scale before and after a tablet-based assessment in two schools. Experimenter 1 employed a child-directed speech compared to a monotone speech of Experimenter 2. While brilliant (5 out of 5) was the most frequent answer option in all conditions, the mean scores were higher and associated with a lower variability across both conditions for Experimenter 2. We discuss a possible experimenter effect in the Smileyometer and implications for evaluating children’s user experiences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (3 UL)
See detailHow do pupils experience Technology-Based Assessments? Implications for methodological approaches to measuring the User Experience based on two case studies in France and Luxembourg
Lehnert, Florence Kristin UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 12)

Technology-based assessments (TBAs) are widely used in the education field to examine whether the learning goals were achieved. To design fair and child-friendly TBAs that enable pupils to perform at ... [more ▼]

Technology-based assessments (TBAs) are widely used in the education field to examine whether the learning goals were achieved. To design fair and child-friendly TBAs that enable pupils to perform at their best (i.a. independent of individual differences in computer literacy), we must ensure reliable and valid data collection. By reducing Human-Computer Interaction issues, we provide the best possible assessment conditions and user experience (UX) with the TBA and reduce educational inequalities. Good UX is thus a prerequisite for better data validity. Building on a recent case study, we investigated how pupils perform TBAs in real-life settings. We addressed the context-dependent factors resulting from the observations that ultimately influence the UX. The first case study was conducted with pupils age 6 to 7 in three elementary schools in France (n=61) in collaboration with la direction de l’évaluation, de la prospective et de la performance (DEPP). The second case study was done with pupils age 12 to 16 in four secondary schools in Luxembourg (n=104) in collaboration with the Luxembourg Centre for Educational Testing (LUCET). This exploratory study focused on the collection of various qualitative datasets to identify factors that influence the interaction with the TBA. We also discuss the importance of teachers’ moderation style and mere system-related characteristics, such as audio protocols of the assessment data. This study contribution comprises design recommendations and implications for methodological approaches to measuring pupils’ user experience during TBAs. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (3 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Framework of Security-Enhancing Friction: How UX Can Help Users Behave More Securely
Distler, Verena UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in New Security Paradigms Workshop (2020, October 26)

A growing body of research in the usable privacy and security community addresses the question of how to best influence user behavior to reduce risk-taking.We propose to address this challenge by ... [more ▼]

A growing body of research in the usable privacy and security community addresses the question of how to best influence user behavior to reduce risk-taking.We propose to address this challenge by integrating the concept of user experience (UX) into empirical usable privacy and security studies that attempt to change risktaking behavior. UX enables us to study the complex interplay between user-related, system-related and contextual factors and provides insights into the experiential aspects underlying behavior change, including negative experiences. We first compare and contrast existing security-enhancing interventions (e.g., nudges, warnings, fear appeals) through the lens of friction. We then build on these insights to argue that it can be desirable to design for moments of negative UX in security-critical situations. For this purpose, we introduce the novel concept of security-enhancing friction, friction that effectively reduces the occurrence of risk-taking behavior and ensures that the overall UX (after use) is not compromised. We illustrate how security-enhancing friction provides an actionable way to systematically integrate the concept of UX into empirical usable privacy and security studies for meeting both the objectives of secure behavior and of overall acceptable experience. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 169 (35 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring the Contextual Dimension of User Experience: Development of the User Experience Context Scale (UXCS)
Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Proceedings of the 11th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Shaping Experiences, Shaping Society (2020, October)

The context of use has been highlighted for a long time as being a key factor impacting User Experience (UX). Yet current UX evaluation tools, especially questionnaires, rarely encompass an explicit ... [more ▼]

The context of use has been highlighted for a long time as being a key factor impacting User Experience (UX). Yet current UX evaluation tools, especially questionnaires, rarely encompass an explicit investigation of the context. With the ever-growing trend for mobile products and ubiquitous computing, the absence of a dedicated measurement tool becomes critical. Based on a review of relevant literature and a fine-grained categorization of contextual factors, we developed the UX Context Scale (UXCS), a 30-items instrument allowing for a measure of context properties, as perceived by the user. We report on the development of the scale and present a first validation study (N = 137). A principal component analysis on the subjective items reveals a 6-components structure: Physical Context, Social Context, Internal Context, Perceived Resources, Task Context, and Temporal Context. Reliability of each subscale is high and further analyses confirm the relevance of this tool for UX evaluation. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMaking Encryption Feel Secure: Investigating how Descriptions of Encryption Impact Perceived Security
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in The 5th European Workshop on Usable Security (EuroUSEC 2020) (2020)

When communication about security to end users is ineffective, people frequently misinterpret the protection offered by a system. The discrepancy between the security users perceive a system to have and ... [more ▼]

When communication about security to end users is ineffective, people frequently misinterpret the protection offered by a system. The discrepancy between the security users perceive a system to have and the actual system state can lead to potentially risky behaviors. It is thus crucial to understand how security perceptions are shaped by interface elements such as text-based descriptions of encryption. This article addresses the question of how encryption should be described to non-experts in a way that enhances perceived security. We tested the following within-subject variables in an online experiment (N=309): a) how to best word encryption, b) whether encryption should be described with a focus on the process or outcome, or both c) whether the objective of encryption should be mentioned d) when mentioning the objective of encryption, how to best describe it e) whether a hash should be displayed to the user. We also investigated the role of context (between subjects). The verbs “encrypt” and “secure” performed comparatively well at enhancing perceived security. Overall, participants stated that they felt more secure not knowing about the objective of encryption. When it is necessary to state the objective, positive wording of the objective of encryption worked best. We discuss implications and why using these results to design for perceived lack of security might be of interest as well. This leads us to discuss ethical concerns, and we give guidelines for the design of user interfaces where encryption should be communicated to end users. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow Acceptable Is This? How User Experience Factors Can Broaden our Understanding of the Acceptance of Privacy Trade-Offs
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Computers in Human Behavior (2019)

Privacy is a timely topic that is increasingly scrutinized in the public eye. In spite of privacy and security breaches, people still frequently compromise their privacy in exchange for certain benefits ... [more ▼]

Privacy is a timely topic that is increasingly scrutinized in the public eye. In spite of privacy and security breaches, people still frequently compromise their privacy in exchange for certain benefits of a technology or a service. This study builds on both technology acceptance (TA) and user experience (UX) research in order to explore and build hypotheses regarding additional dimensions that might play a role in the acceptability of privacy tradeoffs that are not currently accounted for in TA models. Using four scenarios describing situations with potential privacy trade-offs, we conducted a focus group study with 8 groups of participants (N = 32). Our results suggest that factors influencing privacy trade-offs go beyond existing TA factors alone. A technology's perceived usefulness plays an important role, as well as dimensions related to context, previous experiences, perceived autonomy and the feeling of control over the data being shared. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailUser Experience Design for E-Voting: How mental models align with security mechanisms
Zollinger, Marie-Laure UL; Distler, Verena UL; Roenne, Peter UL et al

in Electronic Voting (2019, October)

This paper presents a mobile application for vote-casting and vote-verification based on the Selene e-voting protocol and explains how it was developed and implemented using the User Experience Design ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a mobile application for vote-casting and vote-verification based on the Selene e-voting protocol and explains how it was developed and implemented using the User Experience Design process. The resulting interface was tested with 38 participants, and user experience data was collected via questionnaires and semi-structured interviews on user experience and perceived security. Results concerning the impact of displaying security mechanisms on UX were presented in a complementary paper. Here we expand on this analysis by studying the mental models revealed during the interviews and compare them with theoretical security notions. Finally, we propose a list of improvements for designs of future voting protocols. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 158 (14 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSecurity – Visible, Yet Unseen? How Displaying Security Mechanisms Impacts User Experience and Perceived Security
Distler, Verena UL; Zollinger, Marie-Laure UL; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in Proceedings of ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI2019) (2019, April)

An unsolved debate in the field of usable security concerns whether security mechanisms should be visible, or blackboxed away from the user for the sake of usability. However, tying this question to ... [more ▼]

An unsolved debate in the field of usable security concerns whether security mechanisms should be visible, or blackboxed away from the user for the sake of usability. However, tying this question to pragmatic usability factors only might be simplistic. This study aims at researching the impact of displaying security mechanisms on user experience (UX) in the context of e-voting. Two versions of an e-voting application were designed and tested using a between-group experimental protocol (N=38). Version D displayed security mechanisms, while version ND did not reveal any security-related information. We collected data on UX using standardised evaluation scales and semi-structured interviews. Version D performed better overall in terms of UX and need fulfilment. Qualitative analysis of the interviews gives further insights into factors impacting perceived security. Our study adds to existing research suggesting a conceptual shift from usability to UX and discusses implications for designing and evaluating secure systems. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 463 (57 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailArt in Rich-Prospect: Evaluating Next-Generation User Interfaces for Cultural Heritage
Morse, Christopher UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in Morse, Christopher; Koenig, Vincent; Lallemand, Carine (Eds.) et al MW2019: Museums and the Web, Boston 2-6 April 2019 (2019, March)

The present study reports on the user experience (UX) of rich-prospect browsing, an emerging interface design trend for digital cultural heritage. Building on research that suggests online museum ... [more ▼]

The present study reports on the user experience (UX) of rich-prospect browsing, an emerging interface design trend for digital cultural heritage. Building on research that suggests online museum collections are used only infrequently by the general public, this study investigates the role of next-generation user interfaces in the design of optimal browsing experiences. Moreover, it describes the results of user testing for three different arts and culture collections that make use of rich-prospect. The study recruited 30 participants of varying ages, nationalities, and museum visiting habits to discuss their museum experiences and test three different applications: Coins, Curator Table, and Museum of the World. The results of the study provide insights into the user experience of a new browsing medium and reveal the information-seeking habits and patterns that occurred within these information environments. Moreover, the study isolated the core features of rich-prospect in order to define opportunities and pain points during the browsing experience and indicated which features in particular are most important to people during the browsing experience. Finally, we suggest some best practices going forward in the design of rich-prospect. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 182 (17 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailExperience matters: Bridging the gap between experience- and functionality-driven design in technology-enhanced learning
Rohles, Björn UL; Koenig, Vincent UL; Fischbach, Antoine UL et al

in International Journal on Interaction Design & Architecture(s) (2019), 42

With the growing importance of digital technologies in learning and assessment, it is important to consider user experience (UX) to ensure that tools provide useful functionalities for learning without ... [more ▼]

With the growing importance of digital technologies in learning and assessment, it is important to consider user experience (UX) to ensure that tools provide useful functionalities for learning without overwhelming users, to motivate users and ensure that they have positive learning experiences, and to allow users to realize their potential with the help of technology. Building on a case study of concept mapping for technology-enhanced learning, we combined experience-driven and functionality-driven approaches in co-design sessions in four school classes (67 students). We investigated the anticipated experiences that students imagined as well as the functionalities and characteristics they expected. We found that combining experience-driven and functionality-driven approaches is a valuable method for improving technology-enhanced learning. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 134 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDark Patterns: Deception or Simply Bad Design?
Rossi, Arianna UL; Lenzini, Gabriele UL; Koenig, Vincent UL et al

Poster (2019)

Lately, researchers, journalists, and regulators are devoting attention to dark patterns, defined as "design choices that benefit an online service by coercing, steering or deceiving users into making ... [more ▼]

Lately, researchers, journalists, and regulators are devoting attention to dark patterns, defined as "design choices that benefit an online service by coercing, steering or deceiving users into making decisions that, if fully informed and capable of selecting alternatives, they would not make". Those patterns that have the purpose" or the "substantial effect of obscuring, subverting, or impairing user autonomy, decision-making, or choice" have also been qualified as dark. These definitions are dense: they contain concepts like coercion, nudging, and deception that all alone would deserve an entire work to be discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 184 (21 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA UX Approach to Privacy and Security: the Impact of User, Contextual and System-Related Factors
Distler, Verena UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in CHI Workshop Exploring Individual Diffferences in Privacy (2018, April)

This position paper lays out current and future studies which we conduct on the UX aspects of security and privacy, our goal being to understand which factors influence privacy-related decision-making. We ... [more ▼]

This position paper lays out current and future studies which we conduct on the UX aspects of security and privacy, our goal being to understand which factors influence privacy-related decision-making. We advocate using UX design methods in order to study interindividual differences, system-related and contextual factors involved in privacy and security attitudes and behaviors. These results will contribute to user-tailored and personalized privacy initiatives and guide the design of future technologies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 281 (17 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailÉvaluations numériques: quel rôle pour l’expérience utilisateur ?
Pere, Maxime UL; Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

Scientific Conference (2018, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 175 (17 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailHow Could an Intranet be Like a Friend to Me?: Why Standardized UX Scales Don't Always Fit
Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2017 (2017, October)

"I hope that this survey is a joke because it made me laugh so much". This quote is just one example of many negative respondents' reactions gathered during a large-scale user experience (UX) study ... [more ▼]

"I hope that this survey is a joke because it made me laugh so much". This quote is just one example of many negative respondents' reactions gathered during a large-scale user experience (UX) study. Unfortunately, the survey was no joke, rather a well-constructed and validated standardized UX scale. This paper critically reflects on the use and relevance of standardized UX scales for the evaluation of UX in business contexts. We report on a real-world use case where the meCUE questionnaire has been used to assess employees' experience (N=263) with their organization's intranet. Strong users' reactions to the survey's items and statistical analyses both suggest that the scale is unsuitable for the evaluation of business-oriented systems. Drawing on the description of this inadequacy, we discuss the quality of academic UX tools, calling into question the relevance for practice of academic methods. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 174 (15 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe vocabulary of Learner-Space Interactions - Understanding learning spaces experience through the repertory grid method
Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Interaction Design & Architecture(s) (2017), 32

Higher education institutions are facing new educational challenges and are striving for an evolution in pedagogical practices. This evolution is accompanied by the need for innovative learning spaces to ... [more ▼]

Higher education institutions are facing new educational challenges and are striving for an evolution in pedagogical practices. This evolution is accompanied by the need for innovative learning spaces to support students in the development of “21st century skills”. Designing these spaces requires a deep understanding of learners’ needs and experiences. User-centered design therefore appears as an adequate process to understand learning experiences in relation to spatial design. In this paper, we describe how the repertory grid method has been used to explore students’ perceptions of learning environments (N = 26). We identified 381 personal constructs (contrasted word pairs) associated with learning spaces and grouped them into seven categories (22 subcategories), ranked by number of occurrences. This study provides a basis for the development of a vocabulary of learners-spaces interactions, in support of the design and assessment of learning space experiences. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 186 (13 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLab Testing Beyond Usability: Challenges and Recommendations for Assessing User Experiences
Lallemand, Carine UL; Koenig, Vincent UL

in Journal of Usability Studies (2017), 12(3), 133-154

In the “third wave” of human-computer interaction (HCI), the advent of the conceptual approach of UX broadens and changes the HCI landscape. Methods approved before, mainly within the conceptual approach ... [more ▼]

In the “third wave” of human-computer interaction (HCI), the advent of the conceptual approach of UX broadens and changes the HCI landscape. Methods approved before, mainly within the conceptual approach of usability, are still widely used, and yet their adequacy for UX evaluation remains uncertain in many applications. Laboratory testing is undoubtedly the most prominent example of such a method. Hence, in this study, we investigated how the more comprehensive and emotional scope of UX can be assessed by laboratory testing. In this paper, we report on a use case study involving 70 participants. They first took part in user/laboratory tests and then were asked to evaluate their experience with the two systems (perceived UX) by filling out an AttrakDiff scale and a UX needs fulfillment questionnaire. We conducted post-test interviews to better understand participants’ experiences. We analyzed how the participants’ perceived UX depends on quantitative (e.g., task completion time, task sequence, level of familiarity with the system) and qualitative aspects (think aloud, debriefing interviews) within the laboratory context. Results indicate that the laboratory setting has a strong impact on the participants’ perceived UX, and support a discussion of the quality and limitations of laboratory evaluations regarding UX assessment. In this paper, we have identified concrete challenges and have provided solutions and tips useful for both practitioners and researchers who seek to account for the subjective, situated, and temporal nature of the UX in their assessments. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 400 (13 UL)