References of "Koeleman, Floor 50026461"
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See detailScientific Instruments in Constcamer Paintings: Pictorial Space as a Context for Interpretation
Koeleman, Floor UL

Scientific Conference (2020, September)

Representations of scientific instruments abound in the seventeenth-century genre of constcamer paintings. These works of art depict interiors full of rich collections of artifacts, natural materials ... [more ▼]

Representations of scientific instruments abound in the seventeenth-century genre of constcamer paintings. These works of art depict interiors full of rich collections of artifacts, natural materials, animals and people, and were created almost exclusively in Antwerp and Brussels. In contrast to material and written sources, such images provide us with a context, captured in paint, which contributes to our understanding of the contemporary meaning of scientific instruments. This presentation will highlight the wide variety of instruments (mainly optical and mathematical) that are included in constcamer paintings. Depending on how we define ‘scientific instrument’, between 63 and 100 constcamer paintings from the early modern period can be identified as including representations of scientific instruments. The study of these images from the perspective of the visual and material culture of science not only provides further insight into the variety of instruments that existed at the time, but also sheds light on how painters produced these representations, either by using an actual object or by resorting to a preexisting depiction. It will be shown that the instruments in the paintings reflect a thriving glass industry and the activity of skilled goldsmiths in local workshops and at the archducal court. While over the course of the seventeenth century the novelty of such instruments declined, their association with knowledge of nature, the role of vision and the art of painting persisted. As such, the instruments in constcamer paintings denote both a practical and a philosophical dimension, relating to the world of the senses as well as the intellect. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (8 UL)
See detailConstcamer Paintings as Epistemic Images: Early Modern Theaters of Wisdom
Koeleman, Floor UL

Scientific Conference (2020, April 04)

This paper argues, against existing literature, that 17th-cent. constcamer paintings were objects to think with, functioning as the two-dimensional space of artificial memory. In turn, these artworks ... [more ▼]

This paper argues, against existing literature, that 17th-cent. constcamer paintings were objects to think with, functioning as the two-dimensional space of artificial memory. In turn, these artworks complicate conventional definitions of epistemic images more broadly. I focus on an analysis of constcamer paintings accounting for the reception of the ancients and the mnemonic and propaedeutic role of images, entailing concepts such as wonder or thauma (from Greek θεάομαι), the drive to gather knowledge, memory as the locus of this ‘collection’, and recollecting as the intellectual process of interaction with memorized knowledge. The term inventor, referring to the creator of a given collection, is derived from the rhetorical technique for the retrieval of information. The theatre or ‘place for viewing’ provided the physical context for the collected wisdom. Inventors of constcamer paintings – often artists themselves – vitally participated in knowledge formation contributing to contemporary intellectual debates. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (4 UL)
See detailThe Discovery of Ghijsbrecht Donckere’s Perpetuum Mobile: Visual Proof of the First Barometer?
Koeleman, Floor UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 27)

Ghijsbrecht Donckere is sometimes associated with the invention of the barometer, based on two textual sources from about 1620. No visual record was known of Donckere’s instrument, which was referred to ... [more ▼]

Ghijsbrecht Donckere is sometimes associated with the invention of the barometer, based on two textual sources from about 1620. No visual record was known of Donckere’s instrument, which was referred to as a perpetuum mobile, until now. The rediscovery of a third source, and more importantly, the identification of his device on a contemporary painting, calls for a reassessment. The surroundings of the perpetual motion machine as represented in paint place this instrument at the intersection of natural philosophy and mechanical engineering. Donckere’s invention appears to be loosely based on Cornelis Drebbel’s perpetuum mobile (ca. 1607), and was commissioned by a courtly couple that was already partially informed about the hidden cause of motion of this machine. Nevertheless, the symbolic meaning of the object, rather than an understanding of its actual workings, is put on display. Donckere’s instrument is thus inextricably linked to one of the Aristotelian senses, and to concepts of astronomy and harmony, such as the primum mobile and musica universalis. Even though the textual evidence suggests that the device was at some point used to predict the weather, a reinterpretation particularly emphasizes the rhetoric of the time. The sources do not indicate that the effect of atmospheric pressure was already known. Taking these observations into account, the label of barometer does not seem applicable to Donckere’s perpetuum mobile. The newly revealed visual proof portrays the instrument instead as a collector’s item to be interpreted intellectually by an elite clientele in the early seventeenth century. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 79 (7 UL)
See detailReimagining​ ​the​ ​Lansdowne​ ​Dining​ ​Room​ ​Using​ ​the​ ​Met’s​ ​Open​ ​Access​ ​Collections
Koeleman, Floor UL

Scientific Conference (2018, April 07)

The​ ​British​ ​Galleries​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Metropolitan​ ​Museum​ ​of​ ​Art​ ​are​ ​closed​ ​for​ ​renovation​ ​until approximately​ ​fall​ ​2018.​ ​Reinstalling​ ​these​ ​galleries​ ​also​ ​means​ ... [more ▼]

The​ ​British​ ​Galleries​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Metropolitan​ ​Museum​ ​of​ ​Art​ ​are​ ​closed​ ​for​ ​renovation​ ​until approximately​ ​fall​ ​2018.​ ​Reinstalling​ ​these​ ​galleries​ ​also​ ​means​ ​reimagining​ ​three​ ​British​ ​period rooms,​ ​including​ ​the​ ​Dining​ ​Room​ ​from​ ​Lansdowne​ ​House​ ​(1760s).​ ​As​ ​is​ ​often​ ​the​ ​case,​ ​the moveable​ ​objects​ ​that​ ​used​ ​to​ ​decorate​ ​this​ ​interior​ ​space​ ​are​ ​no​ ​longer​ ​traceable​ ​today. Fortunately,​ ​the​ ​museum​ ​has​ ​a​ ​vast​ ​collection​ ​of​ ​decorative​ ​arts​ ​and​ ​sculpture​ ​to​ ​be​ ​able​ ​to replace​ ​the​ ​lost​ ​items.​ ​The​ ​Met’s​ ​Open​ ​Access​ ​collections​ ​data​ ​is​ ​available​ ​as​ ​a​ ​downloadable Comma​ ​Separated​ ​Value​ ​(.CSV)​ ​file​ ​on​ ​Github.​ ​By​ ​exploring​ ​this​ ​data​ ​we​ ​aim​ ​to​ ​find​ ​all​ ​artworks that​ ​could​ ​be​ ​relevant​ ​for​ ​display​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Lansdowne​ ​Dining​ ​Room.​ ​We​ ​reduced​ ​the​ ​total​ ​amount of​ ​454,084​ ​objects​ ​to​ ​1,724​ ​items​ ​related​ ​to​ ​this​ ​particular​ ​room,​ ​based​ ​on​ ​filters​ ​like​ ​period, location​ ​and​ ​classification.​ ​The​ ​task​ ​of​ ​making​ ​a​ ​final​ ​sub​ ​collection​ ​of​ ​artworks​ ​to​ ​be​ ​exhibited in​ ​a​ ​period​ ​room​ ​is​ ​usually​ ​reserved​ ​to​ ​curators.​ ​With​ ​the​ ​online​ ​interactive​ ​visualization​ ​we made​ ​you​ ​can​ ​step​ ​into​ ​their​ ​shoes​ ​and​ ​try​ ​it​ ​yourself. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 73 (6 UL)
See detailVisualizing Visions: Explorative Methods and Discovering the Rijksmuseum Digital Collection
Koeleman, Floor UL

Scientific Conference (2017, November 28)

There is an ongoing trend to digitize museum collections. This ambitious task requires large amounts of time, money and other resources. Nevertheless, these institutions think it is a worthy investment ... [more ▼]

There is an ongoing trend to digitize museum collections. This ambitious task requires large amounts of time, money and other resources. Nevertheless, these institutions think it is a worthy investment. But why? The consensus is that it will revolutionize art historical research. We look for opportunities using different tools and datasets and how useful they actually are for researchers. The dataset is usually a big hurdle when we want to get started with ‘digital art history’. This term refers to the transformative effect digital methods may have on the discipline of art history. We can easily overcome this hurdle by making use of already existing datasets. Especially since collecting data in itself is not a scholarly activity. For instance, the collection of the Rijksmuseum Amsterdam consists of about a million items, of which many are annotated and made available online. For this presentation we used the Rijksmuseum API and developed our own tools to search the digital paintings collection. A first experimental interface is shown in the screenshot above, allowing a simple comparison of artists and certain predefined themes. Using a number of basic elements we can quickly get an idea of the composition of the dataset. We can use a scatter plot to visualize dimensions and bring them into proportion to the largest artwork, ​The Night Watch​. Or use a timeline that reveals at a glance that the vast majority of the paintings collection dates back to the Dutch Golden Age. We are now taking this first experiment to the next level. And over the course of this project we do not only want to study datasets of visual culture. We also want to (learn how to) show our findings visually. To this end we follow the ‘Seven Stages of Visualizing Data’ by Ben Fry. Of great importance to us is step 7, interact, to achieve interactive information visualizations. As a result we are delighted to present to you our story of the Rijksmuseum digital collection. We have chosen storytelling to communicate our data insights. But how do such methods contribute to the history of art? And how useful are existing datasets for answering academic research questions? Lastly we will reflect on our experiences with the Rijksmuseum dataset. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (4 UL)