References of "Kieffer, Nelly 40000368"
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See detailOverexpression of the partially activated alpha(IIb)beta3D723H integrin salt bridge mutant downregulates RhoA activity and induces microtubule-dependent proplatelet-like extensions in Chinese hamster ovary cells
Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth UL; Salsmann, Alexandre UL; Debili, Najet et al

in Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis [=JTH] (2009), 7(7), 1207-1217

BACKGROUND: We have recently reported a novel mutation in the beta3 subunit of the platelet fibrinogen receptor (alpha(IIb)beta3D723H) identified in a patient with dominantly inherited ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: We have recently reported a novel mutation in the beta3 subunit of the platelet fibrinogen receptor (alpha(IIb)beta3D723H) identified in a patient with dominantly inherited macrothrombocytopenia, and we have shown that this mutation promotes a new phenotype in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, characterized by fibrinogen-dependent, microtubule-driven proplatelet-like cell extensions. RESULTS: Here we demonstrate that the partially activated alpha(IIb)beta3D723H or alpha(IIb)beta3D723A salt bridge mutants, but not fully activated alpha(IIb)beta3 mutants, cause this phenotype. Time-lapse videomicroscopy clearly differentiated these stable microtubule-driven and nocodazole-sensitive extensions from common dynamic actin-driven pseudopodia. In addition, overexpression of a mitochondrial marker confirmed their functional role in organelle transport. Comparative immunofluorescence analysis of the subcellular localization of alpha(IIb)beta3, the focal adhesion proteins talin or vinculin and actin revealed a similar membrane labeling of CHO cell extensions and CD34+-derived megakaryocyte proplatelets. Mutant alpha(IIb)beta3D723H signaling was independent of Src, protein kinase C or phosphoinositide 3-kinase, but correlated with decreased RhoA activity as compared with wild-type alpha(IIb)beta3 signaling, reminiscent of integrin signaling during neurite outgrowth. Accordingly, overexpression of constitutively active RhoA in CHO alpha(IIb)beta3D723H cells prevented protrusion formation on fibrinogen. Most interestingly, RhoA/ROCK inhibition was necessary, but not sufficient, and integrin activity was additionally required to induce CHO cell extension formation. CONCLUSIONS: CHO alpha(IIb)beta3D723H cell protrusions and megakaryocyte proplatelets, like neuronal cell neurites, result from a common integrin-dependent signaling pathway, promoting strongly decreased RhoA activity and leading to microtubule-driven formation of cytoplasmic extensions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe talin rod IBS2 alpha-helix interacts with the beta3 integrin cytoplasmic tail membrane-proximal helix by establishing charge complementary salt bridges.
Rodius, Sophie; Chaloin, Olivier; Moes, Michèle UL et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2008), 283(35), 24212-23

Talin establishes a major link between integrins and actin filaments and contains two distinct integrin binding sites: one, IBS1, located in the talin head domain and involved in integrin activation and a ... [more ▼]

Talin establishes a major link between integrins and actin filaments and contains two distinct integrin binding sites: one, IBS1, located in the talin head domain and involved in integrin activation and a second, IBS2, that maps to helix 50 of the talin rod domain and is essential for linking integrin beta subunits to the cytoskeleton ( Moes, M., Rodius, S., Coleman, S. J., Monkley, S. J., Goormaghtigh, E., Tremuth, L., Kox, C., van der Holst, P. P., Critchley, D. R., and Kieffer, N. (2007) J. Biol. Chem. 282, 17280-17288 ). Through the combined approach of mutational analysis of the beta3 integrin cytoplasmic tail and the talin rod IBS2 site, SPR binding studies, as well as site-specific antibody inhibition experiments, we provide evidence that the integrin beta3-talin rod interaction relies on a helix-helix association between alpha-helix 50 of the talin rod domain and the membrane-proximal alpha-helix of the beta3 integrin cytoplasmic tail. Moreover, charge complementarity between the highly conserved talin rod IBS2 lysine residues and integrin beta3 glutamic acid residues is necessary for this interaction. Our results support a model in which talin IBS2 binds to the same face of the beta3 subunit cytoplasmic helix as the integrin alphaIIb cytoplasmic tail helix, suggesting that IBS2 can only interact with the beta3 subunit following integrin activation. [less ▲]

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See detailA nonsynonymous SNP in the ITGB3 gene disrupts the conserved membrane-proximal cytoplasmic salt bridge in the αIIbβ3 integrin and cosegregates dominantly with abnormal proplatelet formation and macrothrombocytopenia
Ghevaert, Cedric; Salsmann, Alexandre UL; Watkins, Nicholas A. et al

in Blood (2008), 111(7), 3407-3414

We report a 3-generation pedigree with 5 individuals affected with a dominantly inherited macrothrombocytopenia. All 5 carry 2 nonsynonymous mutations resulting in a D723H mutation in the beta3 integrin ... [more ▼]

We report a 3-generation pedigree with 5 individuals affected with a dominantly inherited macrothrombocytopenia. All 5 carry 2 nonsynonymous mutations resulting in a D723H mutation in the beta3 integrin and a P53L mutation in glycoprotein (GP) Ibalpha. We show that GPIbalpha-L53 is phenotypically silent, being also present in 3 unaffected pedigree members and in 7 of 1639 healthy controls. The beta3-H723 causes constitutive, albeit partial, activation of the alphaIIbbeta3 complex by disruption of the highly conserved cytoplasmic salt bridge with arginine 995 in the alphaIIb integrin as evidenced by increased PAC-1 but not fibrinogen binding to the patients' resting platelets. This was confirmed in CHO alphaIIbbeta3-H723 transfectants, which also exhibited increased PAC-1 binding, increased adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) in static conditions and to fibrinogen under shear stress. Crucially, we show that in the presence of fibrinogen, alphaIIbbeta3-H723, but not wild-type alphaIIbbeta3, generates a signal that leads to the formation of proplatelet-like protrusions in transfected CHO cells. Abnormal proplatelet formation was confirmed in the propositus's CD34+ stem cell-derived megakaryocytes. We conclude that the constitutive activation of the alphaIIbbeta3-H723 receptor causes abnormal proplatelet formation, leading to incorrect sizing of platelets and the thrombocytopenia observed in the pedigree. [less ▲]

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See detailThe integrin binding site 2 (IBS2) in the talin rod domain is essential for linking integrin beta subunits to the cytoskeleton.
Moes, Michèle UL; Rodius, Sophie; Coleman, Stacey J. et al

in The Journal of biological chemistry (2007), 282(23), 17280-8

Talin1 is a large cytoskeletal protein that links integrins to actin filaments through two distinct integrin binding sites, one present in the talin head domain (IBS1) necessary for integrin activation ... [more ▼]

Talin1 is a large cytoskeletal protein that links integrins to actin filaments through two distinct integrin binding sites, one present in the talin head domain (IBS1) necessary for integrin activation and a second (IBS2) that we have previously mapped to talin residues 1984-2113 (fragment J) of the talin rod domain (1 Tremuth, L., Kreis, S., Melchior, C., Hoebeke, J., Ronde, P., Plancon, S., Takeda, K., and Kieffer, N. (2004) J. Biol. Chem. 279, 22258-22266), but whose functional role is still elusive. Using a bioinformatics and cell biology approach, we have determined the minimal structure of IBS2 and show that this integrin binding site corresponds to 23 residues located in alpha helix 50 of the talin rod domain (residues 2077-2099). Alanine mutation of 2 highly conserved residues (L2094A/I2095A) within this alpha helix, which disrupted the alpha-helical structure of IBS2 as demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy and limited trypsin proteolysis, was sufficient to prevent in vivo talin fragment J targeting to alphaIIbbeta3 integrin in focal adhesions and to inhibit in vitro this association as shown by an alphaIIbbeta3 pulldown assay. Moreover, expression of a full-length mouse green fluorescent protein-talin LI/AA mutant in mouse talin1(-/-) cells was unable to rescue the inability of these cells to assemble focal adhesions (in contrast to green fluorescent protein-talin wild type) despite the presence of IBS1. Our data provide the first direct evidence that IBS2 in the talin rod is essential to link integrins to the cytoskeleton. [less ▲]

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See detailRGD, the Rho'd to cell spreading
Salsmann, Alexandre UL; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth UL; Kieffer, Nelly UL

in European Journal of Cell Biology (2006), 85(3-4), 249-254

Some RGD-type integrins rely on a synergistic site in addition to the canonical RGD site for ligand binding. However, the precise involvement of each of these recognition sites during cell adhesion is ... [more ▼]

Some RGD-type integrins rely on a synergistic site in addition to the canonical RGD site for ligand binding. However, the precise involvement of each of these recognition sites during cell adhesion is still unclear. Here we review recent investigations on integrin alphaIIbbeta3-mediated cell adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen providing evidence that the fibrinogen synergy gamma(400-411) sequence by itself promotes cell attachment by initiating alphaIIbbeta3 clustering and recruitment of intracellular proteins to focal complexes, while the RGD motif subsequently acts as a molecular switch on the beta3 subunit to induce a conformational change necessary for RhoA activation and full cell spreading. [less ▲]

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See detailA new functional role of the fibrinogen RGD motif as the molecular switch that selectively triggers integrin alphaIIbbeta3-dependent RhoA activation during cell spreading
Salsmann, Alexandre UL; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth UL; Kabile, Fabrice UL et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2005), 280(39), 33610-33619

A number of RGD-type integrins rely on a synergistic site in addition to the canonical RGD site for ligand binding and signaling, although it is still unclear whether these two recognition sites function ... [more ▼]

A number of RGD-type integrins rely on a synergistic site in addition to the canonical RGD site for ligand binding and signaling, although it is still unclear whether these two recognition sites function independently, synergistically, or competitively. Experimental evidence has suggested that fibrinogen binding to the RGD-type integrin alphaIIbbeta3 occurs exclusively through the synergistic gamma(400-411) sequence, thus questioning the functional role of the RGD recognition site. Here we have investigated the respective role of the fibrinogen gamma(400-411) sequence and the RGD motif in the molecular events leading to ligand-induced alphaIIbbeta3-dependent Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell or platelet spreading, by using intact fibrinogen and well characterized plasmin-generated fibrinogen fragments containing either the RGD motif (fragment C) or the gamma(400-411) sequence (fragment D), and CHO cells expressing resting wild type (alphaIIbbeta3wt), constitutively active (alphaIIbbeta3T562N), or non-functional (alphaIIbbeta3D119Y) receptors. Our data provide evidence that the gamma(400-411) site by itself is able to initiate alphaIIbbeta3 clustering and recruitment of intracellular proteins to early focal complexes, mediating cell attachment, FAK phosphorylation, and Rac1 activation, while the RGD motif subsequently acts as a molecular switch on the beta3 subunit to trigger cell spreading. More importantly, we show that the premier functional role of the RGD site is not to reinforce cell attachment but, rather, to imprint a conformational change on the beta3 subunit leading to maximal RhoA activation and actin cytoskeleton organization in CHO cells as well as in platelets. Finally, alphaIIbbeta3-dependent RhoA stimulation and cell spreading, but not cell attachment, are Src-dependent and phosphoinositide 3-kinase-independent and are inhibited by the Src antagonist PP2. [less ▲]

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See detailA fluorescence cell biology approach to map the second integrin-binding site of talin to a 130-amino acid sequence within the rod domain
Tremuth, Laurent A; Kreis, Stephanie UL; Melchior, Chantal et al

in Journal of Biological Chemistry (2004), 279(21), 22258-22266

The cytoskeletal protein talin, which provides a direct link between integrins and actin filaments, has been shown to contain two distinct binding sites for integrin β subunits. Here, we report the ... [more ▼]

The cytoskeletal protein talin, which provides a direct link between integrins and actin filaments, has been shown to contain two distinct binding sites for integrin β subunits. Here, we report the precise delimitation and a first functional analysis of the talin rod domain integrin-binding site. Partially overlapping cDNAs covering the entire human talin gene were transiently expressed as DsRed fusion proteins in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing α IIbβ 3, linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Two-color fluorescence analysis of the transfected cells, spread on fibrinogen, revealed distinct subcellular staining patterns including focal adhesion, actin filament, and granular labeling for different talin fragments. The rod domain fragment G (residues 1984-2344), devoid of any known actin- or vinculin-binding sites, colocalized with β 3-GFP in focal adhesions. Direct in vitro interaction of fragment G with native platelet integrin α IIbβ 3 or with the recombinant wild type, but not the Y747A mutant β 3 cytoplasmic tail, linked to glutathione S-transferase, was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance analysis and pull-down assays, respectively. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the in vivo relevance of this interaction by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between β 3-GFP and DsRed-talin fragment G. Further in vitro pull-down studies allowed us to map out the integrin-binding site within fragment G to a stretch of 130 residues (fragment J, residues 1984-2113) that also localized to focal adhesions. Finally, we show by a cell biology approach that this integrin- binding site within the talin rod domain is important for β 3-cytoskeletal interactions but does not participate in α IIbβ 3 activation. [less ▲]

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See detailHPA-1a phenotype-genotype discrepancy reveals a naturally occurring Arg93Gln substitution in the platelet beta 3 integrin that disrupts the HPA-1a epitope.
Watkins, Nicholas A.; Schaffner-Reckinger, Elisabeth UL; Allen, David L. et al

in Blood (2002), 99(5), 1833-9

A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 196 in the beta 3 integrin causes a Leu33Pro substitution in the mature protein. Alloimmunization against the beta 3Leu33 form (human platelet antigen ... [more ▼]

A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 196 in the beta 3 integrin causes a Leu33Pro substitution in the mature protein. Alloimmunization against the beta 3Leu33 form (human platelet antigen [HPA]-1a, Pl(A1), Zw(a)) in patients who are beta 3Pro33 homozygous (HPA-1b1b, Pl(A2A2), Zw(bb)) causes neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, posttransfusion purpura, or refractoriness to platelet transfusion. Studies with recombinant proteins have demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 66 and 288 to 490 of the beta 3 integrin contribute to HPA-1a epitope formation. In determining the HPA-1a status of more than 6000 donors, we identified a donor with an HPA-1a(weak) phenotype and an HPA-1a1b genotype. The platelets from this donor had normal levels of surface alpha IIb beta 3 but reacted only weakly with monoclonal and polyclonal anti-HPA-1a by whole blood enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), flow cytometry, and sandwich ELISA. We reasoned that an alteration in the primary nucleotide sequence of the beta 3Leu33 allele of this donor was disrupting the HPA-1a epitope. In agreement with this hypothesis, sequencing platelet RNA-derived alpha IIb and beta 3 cDNA identified a novel G/A SNP at position 376 of the beta 3 integrin that encodes for an Arg93Gln replacement in the beta 3Leu33 allele. Coexpression of the beta 3Leu33Gln93 encoding cDNA in Chinese hamster ovary cells with human alpha IIb cDNA showed that the surface-expressed alpha IIb beta 3 reacted normally with beta 3 integrin-specific monoclonal antibodies but only weakly with monoclonal anti-HPA-1a. Our results show that an Arg93Gln mutation in the beta 3Leu33 encoding allele disrupts the HPA-1a epitope, suggesting that Arg93 contributes to the formation of the HPA-1a B-cell epitope. [less ▲]

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