References of "Juffermans, Kasper 50002052"
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See detailIntroduction: The Tyranny of Writing in Language and Society
Weth, Constanze UL; Juffermans, Kasper UL

in Weth, Constanze; Juffermans, Kasper (Eds.) Tyranny of Writing: Ideologies of the Written Word (2018)

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See detailTyranny of Writing: Ideologies of the Written Word
Weth, Constanze UL; Juffermans, Kasper UL

Book published by Bloomsbury (2018)

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See detailSouth-North trajectories and language repertoires
Juffermans, Kasper UL; Tavares, Bernardino UL

in Kerfoot, Caroline; Hyltenstam, Kenneth (Eds.) Entangled Discourses: South-North Orders of Visibility (2017)

This chapter explores language in global South-North migration from the perspective of aspiring migrants in Lusophone West Africa within the context of increasingly restrictive European immigration ... [more ▼]

This chapter explores language in global South-North migration from the perspective of aspiring migrants in Lusophone West Africa within the context of increasingly restrictive European immigration regimes and their consequence of involuntary immobility in the South. While sociolinguistic scholarship has successfully engaged with globalization, mobility, and movement of people, it has insufficiently engaged with that which and those who don’t travel well. We argue that a sociolinguistics of globalization needs to develop multi-sited methods and tools for investigating and understanding these absent presences – the invisibly excluded – and propose that repertoires and trajectories are useful tools in such undertaking. The paper attempts a theoretical review of these concepts and illustrates their analytical potential with three cases from ongoing fieldwork in Cape Verde and Guinea-Bissau as part of a larger ethnographic project at the University of Luxembourg that explores the language lives, learning histories, (unfinished) travels, further mobile aspirations and changing social status of young West Africans on the move. The paper concludes by arguing that South-North mobilities are shaped by as well as shaping multilingual repertoires, and are entangled in complex desires and strategies of mobility. [less ▲]

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See detailLiteracy and multilingualism in Africa
Juffermans, Kasper UL; Abdelhay, Ashraf

in Street, Brian V.; May, Stephen (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Language and Education: Literacies and Language Education (2017)

Literacy and multilingualism in Africa is approached here as a field of practice rather than a unified field of research. This field presents a crucial paradox: African contexts present some of the ... [more ▼]

Literacy and multilingualism in Africa is approached here as a field of practice rather than a unified field of research. This field presents a crucial paradox: African contexts present some of the world’s most diverse and vital multilingual situations but also feature in the world’s poorest literacy rates and are routinely said to lack a literate tradition altogether. By reviewing Africa’s script inventions this chapter offers counter-evidence for this deceptive view. Throughout Africa – from the Maghreb over West and Central Africa to the Horn of Africa – there have been significant indigenous script traditions and inventions, including Tifinagh, N’ko, Vai, Bamum and Ge’ez. In fact, some of the world’s oldest known scripts (e.g. Egyptian hieroglyphs) are African scripts. The chapter further outlines two relatively young fields of practice and research that have begun to make major contributions to literacy and multilingualism in Africa: digital literacy and linguistic landscape. These fields share a common interest in the materiality of real language as opposed to idealized images of language and in local agency and creativity in the site of struggle that is language. Like digital language practices, linguistic landscapes constitute a domain for African written multilingualism that is not generally supported or monitored by African states. Nor does either field present simple continuities from colonially inherited language policies and ideologies, in the way that classrooms do. As spaces for writing par excellence linguistic landscapes and mobile phones promise to contribute in no minor way to the development of African language literacies and multilingualism in Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailNorms, Polycentricity, and Polylanguaging on Social Media
Karrebæk, Martha Sif; Stæhr, Andreas; Juffermans, Kasper UL et al

in Duncker, Dorthe; Perregaard, Bettina (Eds.) Creativity and Continuity: Perspectives on the Dynamics of Language Conventionalisation (2016)

This contribution examines adolescent language use, interaction, and acts of identification on social media sites. Our approach is sociolinguistic, and we show how the understanding of language users ... [more ▼]

This contribution examines adolescent language use, interaction, and acts of identification on social media sites. Our approach is sociolinguistic, and we show how the understanding of language users today needs to break free from previously well-established sociolinguistic notions such as languages as countable units. In the following we argue that hybridity in language use is not intrinsically deviant, that language users may have multiple belongings and identifications, and that linguistic ideology must be accounted for by researchers. We also demonstrate how notions such as registers, polycentricity, and (poly)languaging enable us to address the relationships between language users, language form, social goals, and normativity. The data come from three linguistically heterogeneous European settings, and all focus on hybridity and ethnicity. [less ▲]

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See detailHarmony as language policy in China: an Internet perspective
Wang, Xuan; Juffermans, Kasper UL; Du, Caixia

in Language Policy (2016), 15(3), 299-321

This paper provides an ethnographic understanding of harmony as language policy in China, grounded in a historical analysis of ‘harmony’ (和 he) as a distinct traditional Chinese (Confucian) ideal that ... [more ▼]

This paper provides an ethnographic understanding of harmony as language policy in China, grounded in a historical analysis of ‘harmony’ (和 he) as a distinct traditional Chinese (Confucian) ideal that gradually finds its new expressions through the policy of Harmonious Society (和谐社会 hexie shehui) in contemporary China. The paper focuses on language practices surrounding ‘harmony’ emerging from the Internet, a discursive space and site that is both highly diverse and heavily contested with respect to policing processes, and notably so in the context of the PRC for its stringent mea- surement of censorship and sensitization of language use. It is shown that although the state is arguably the strongest stakeholder in implementing the policy of harmony, the actual processes of harmonization online develop in detailed, multidirectional and unpredictable rather than abstract, linear or monofocal ways. The paper offers a descriptive analysis of the field of Internet memes that critique and subvert the policies of harmonization. This includes new meanings for words (e.g. ‘harmony’ as euphemism for censorship) and puns around the acoustic image of hexie and other censorable words, resulting in the circulation and bricolage of myths and songs revolving around ‘river crab’ (hexie) and ‘grass mud horse’ (caonima) as placeholders of dissent, which feed back into offline popular (and critical) culture. The paper concludes with a discussion of the politics of harmony, pointing at the increasingly polycentric realities clashing with the modernist monocentric ideal of the state project of harmony, and with arguments for an ethnographically based understanding and inspection of language policy as an instrument for shaping sociolinguistic life. [less ▲]

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See detailPolycentric repertoires: Constructing Dutch-Chinese youth identities in the classroom and online
Li, Jinling; Juffermans, Kasper UL

in Li, Wei (Ed.) Multilingualism in the Chinese Diaspora Worldwide: Transnational Connections and Local Social Realities (2016)

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See detailLocal Languaging, Literacy and Multilingualism in a West African Society
Juffermans, Kasper UL

Book published by Multilingual Matters (2015)

This book aims to enhance and challenge our understanding of language and literacy as social practice against the background of heightened globalisation. Juffermans presents an ethnographic study of the ... [more ▼]

This book aims to enhance and challenge our understanding of language and literacy as social practice against the background of heightened globalisation. Juffermans presents an ethnographic study of the linguistic landscape of The Gambia, arguing that language should be conceptualised as a verb (languaging) rather than a countable noun (a language, languages). He goes on to argue that sociolinguistics should not be defined as the study of ‘who speaks what language to whom, and when and to what end’ (as Fishman defined it), but as the study of who uses which linguistic features under particular circumstances in a particular place and time. The book is therefore in part an exercise to unpluralise language, which Juffermans argues is necessary for a more realistic understanding of what language is, what it does, and what people do with it. The book will be of interest to sociolinguistics researchers, especially those focusing on Africa and the global South. [less ▲]

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See detailResearching bilingual and multilingual education multilingually: A linguistic ethnography
Creese, Angela; Blackledge, Adrian; Bhatt, Arvind et al

in Wright, Wayne E.; Sovicheth, Boun; García, Ofelia (Eds.) The Handbook of Bilingual and Multilingual Education (2015)

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See detailLanguage and migration into Luxembourg
Tavares, Bernardino UL; Jurdana, Martin; Juffermans, Kasper UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This is the second in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and ... [more ▼]

This is the second in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and is a three-year CORE research project funded by FNR, Luxembourg. This multi-sited project contributes to the field of sociolinguistics of globalization by investigating language and migration between the global South (Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau) and the global North (Luxembourg) from the perspective of both accomplished and aspiring migrants. In this second research brief we outline sociolinguistic aspects of migration into Luxembourg, with a focus on its Lusophone population. [less ▲]

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See detailTrajectories and repertoires as conceptual tools for a sociolinguistics of globalization
Juffermans, Kasper UL; Tavares, Bernardino UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This is the third in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and ... [more ▼]

This is the third in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and is a three-year CORE research project funded by FNR, Luxembourg. This multi-sited project contributes to the field of sociolinguistics of globalization by investigating language and migration between the global South (Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau) and North (Luxembourg) from the perspective of both accomplished and aspiring migrants. In this third research brief we outline the key conceptual concepts guiding the project, sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires. [less ▲]

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See detailField notes and Facebook: An open fieldwork diary in Guinea Bissau
Juffermans, Kasper UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This is the fourth in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and ... [more ▼]

This is the fourth in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and is a three-year CORE research project funded by FNR, Luxembourg. This multi-sited project seeks to contribute to the field of sociolinguistics of globalization by investigating language and migration between the global South (Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau) and North (Luxembourg) from the perspective of both accomplished and aspiring migrants. This fourth research brief reports on the exploratory fieldwork in Guinea Bissau by Kasper Juffermans from late August to early October 2014. It does so on the basis of Facebook posts sent from the field and reflects on the uses of Facebook as a means to make the fieldwork experience more transparent. [less ▲]

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See detailDutch–Chinese repertoires and language ausbau in superdiversity: A view from digital media
Juffermans, Kasper UL; Blommaert, Jan; Kroon, Sjaak et al

in Discourse, Context & Media (2014), 3(4-5), 48-61

The Chinese diaspora in the Netherlands is undergoing a dramatic diversification since the 1990s. This is manifested sociolinguistically in a shift from Cantonese and traditional character script to ... [more ▼]

The Chinese diaspora in the Netherlands is undergoing a dramatic diversification since the 1990s. This is manifested sociolinguistically in a shift from Cantonese and traditional character script to Mandarin and simplified characters as default registers of Chinese. Young people of Chinese heritage critically respond to and (re-) position themselves against these changes. This paper explores their identity work and language identifications and adopts a view from digital media to this end. Such a view provides insight into the unstable and shifting conditions and contexts of being, speaking and learning Chinese in the diaspora. Theoretically the paper builds on a view of language as practice, translanguaging, repertoires and linguistic citizenship, and revisits Heinz Kloss' notion of “ausbau” as a concept in language policy and planning. Applied to both language and identity, the revisited notion of ausbau is meant to capture the tension between language/identity as an individual, biographic project involving personal investment and planning, and language/identity as a social, historical project sponsored by nations and states (such as the PRC). In the discussion threads that are presented and analysed, both of these poles provoke critical reflection and stancetaking: critique and resistance to the hegemonic power of the PRC's language ausbau, and self-critique in the form of self-depreciating evaluation of personally accomplished language ausbau. This contribution draws on a recently completed two-year ethnographic study in and around a Chinese complementary school in the Netherlands as part of a larger funded project investigating discourses of inheritance and identities in four multilingual European settings. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital language practices in superdiversity: Introduction
Androutsopoulos, Jannis; Juffermans, Kasper UL

in Discourse, Context & Media (2014), 3(4-5), 1-6

This article introduces a special issue on digital language practices in superdiversity that brings together research at the intersection of two emerging areas of scholarship in sociocultural linguistics ... [more ▼]

This article introduces a special issue on digital language practices in superdiversity that brings together research at the intersection of two emerging areas of scholarship in sociocultural linguistics, digital communication and superdiversity. It explores this relationship from two angles: the role of digital language practices in contexts of societal superdiversity, and the relevance of superdiversity as a theoretical perspective for the study of digital language practices. This introduction first outlines the concept of superdiversity and the way digital media and communication technologies are conceptualized in literature on superdiversity and relevant earlier scholarship. It then turns to the reception of superdiversity in sociolinguistics and the role of digital language and literacy in this discussion and outlines a number of research perspectives on digital language practices in superdiversity. The detailed empirical analyses of the nine papers in the issue show that digital language practices in settings of superdiversity extend and complicate the semiotic resources available to people or their performance of identities and social relationships. [less ▲]

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See detailDigital language practices in superdiversity
Androutsopoulos, Jannis; Juffermans, Kasper UL

in Discourse, Context & Media (2014), 3(4-5), 1-120

This special issue brings together research at the intersection of two emerging areas of scholarship in sociocultural linguistics, digital communication and superdiversity. It explores this relationship ... [more ▼]

This special issue brings together research at the intersection of two emerging areas of scholarship in sociocultural linguistics, digital communication and superdiversity. It explores this relationship from two angles: the role of digital language practices in contexts of societal superdiversity, and the relevance of superdiversity as a theoretical perspective for the study of digital language practices. The detailed empirical analyses of the nine papers in the issue show that digital language practices in settings of superdiversity extend and complicate the semiotic resources available to people or their performance of identities and social relationships. [less ▲]

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See detailEnglishing, imaging and local languaging in the Gambian linguistic landscape
Juffermans, Kasper UL

in Juffermans, Kasper; Asfaha, Yonas Mesfun; Abdelhay, Ashraf (Eds.) African Literacies: Ideologies, Scripts, Education (2014)

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See detailAfrican literacy ideologies, scripts and education
Abdelhay, Ashraf; Asfaha, Yonas Mesfun; Juffermans, Kasper UL

in Juffermans, Kasper; Asfaha, Yonas Mesfun; Abdelhay, Ashraf (Eds.) African Literacies: Ideologies, Scripts and Education (2014)

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See detailAfrican Literacies: Ideologies, Scripts, Education
Juffermans, Kasper UL; Asfaha, Yonas Mesfun; Abdelhay, Ashraf

Book published by Cambridge Scholars (2014)

Africa is often depicted as the continent with the lowest literacy rates in the world. Moving beyond this essentialising representation, this volume explores African literacies within their complex and ... [more ▼]

Africa is often depicted as the continent with the lowest literacy rates in the world. Moving beyond this essentialising representation, this volume explores African literacies within their complex and diverse multilingual and multiscriptal histories and contexts of use. The chapters choose contexts from the Maghreb to Mozambique and from Senegambia to the Horn of Africa, and critically analyse multiple literacy genres and practices - from ancient manuscripts to instant messaging - in relation to questions of language-in-education and policy, livelihoods, Islamic scholarship, colonialism, translocal migration and writing systems. As a whole, the book may be read as an advanced introduction to language and society in Africa seen through the lens of literacy or as a contribution to scholarship in literacy studies offering a convenient collection of perspectives on/from Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailMigration from West Africa, with special reference to Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau
Tavares, Bernardino UL; Juffermans, Kasper UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This is the first in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and ... [more ▼]

This is the first in a series of research briefs in the STAR project. STAR stands for “Sociolinguistic trajectories and repertoires: Luso-Luxo-African identifications, interactions and imaginations”, and is a 3-year CORE research project funded by FNR, Luxembourg. The multi-sited project, meant as contribution to the field of sociolinguistics of globalization, investigates language and migration between the global South (Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau) and North (Luxembourg) from the perspective of both accomplished and desired migrants. In this first research brief we review literature on flows of migration from West Africa. [less ▲]

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See detailLearning and teaching Chinese in the Netherlands: The metapragmatics of a polycentric language
Li, Jinling; Juffermans, Kasper UL

in Curdt-Christiansen, Xiao-Lan; Hancock, Andrew (Eds.) Learning Chinese in Diasporic Communities: Many pathways to being Chinese (2014)

This paper is concerned with the metapragmatics of Chinese as a polycentric language. Based on ethnographic observation and interview in and around a Chinese complementary school in the Netherlands, this ... [more ▼]

This paper is concerned with the metapragmatics of Chinese as a polycentric language. Based on ethnographic observation and interview in and around a Chinese complementary school in the Netherlands, this paper describes an ongoing shift along with demographic, economic and political changes, in what counts as Chinese: a shift from Hong Kong and Taipei to Beijing as the most powerful centre of Chinese in the world. Migration makes communicative resources like language varieties globally mobile and this affects the normativity in the diaspora classroom. A clearer understanding of the metapragmatics of Chinese is useful because it provides a key to understanding social identities in contemporary Chinese migration contexts and to understanding language within contexts of current globalisation. [less ▲]

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