References of "Janz, Nina 50034045"
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See detailWhy do historians collect new sources? War Experiences in Luxembourg. The Second World War and Today
Janz, Nina UL

Speeches/Talks (2023)

The military offensive launched by the Russian Federation against Ukraine in the early hours of 24 February 2022 and the ensuing war on Ukrainian territory have resulted in immense human suffering, a ... [more ▼]

The military offensive launched by the Russian Federation against Ukraine in the early hours of 24 February 2022 and the ensuing war on Ukrainian territory have resulted in immense human suffering, a humanitarian tragedy and incalculable material damage. The violation of a country’s territorial integrity and sovereignty – an act in clear breach of the United Nations Charter – has shattered the shared framework of values and principles fostered by multilateralism after the Second World War in the hope of achieving world peace, while leading to an unprecedented outpouring of solidarity for Ukraine and the plight of its people from Western democracies and European and international organisations, including NATO, the UN, the European Union and the Council of Europe, and their Member States and private initiatives. As contemporary history is turned on its head, historians, driven by the duty of memory, are stepping up to explain the origins of the conflict, identify the various players, provide an objective analysis of the consequences, record the memories of eyewitnesses and victims – with oral history proving a precious tool –, preserve historical sources and, above all, reflect on the role that intellectual effort can play in paving the way for a return to peace in the new world order taking shape before our eyes. [less ▲]

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See detailVerbindung zur Heimat. Kriegsbriefe in der Forschung und die Nutzung von digitalen Werkzeugen
Janz, Nina UL

Article for general public (2022)

Letters as a study of the history of personal stories/fates. The Warlux project aims to collect the personal war experiences of men and women who were conscripted into labour and/or military service by ... [more ▼]

Letters as a study of the history of personal stories/fates. The Warlux project aims to collect the personal war experiences of men and women who were conscripted into labour and/or military service by the Nazi occupation administration during the Second World War in Luxembourg. In order to present the individual perspective and the personal impact of the war at the front, in the labour camps and at home, we have collected over 5000 letters and diaries from the families concerned via an appeal for donations in 2021. The letters all need to be organised, structured and read. Digital tools such as scanners and text recognition help historians prepare the letters for analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailStudent Project - WAR LETTERS. Teaching with Transkribus Lite
Janz, Nina UL

Presentation (2022, September 30)

Teaching Project based on war letters from Project WARLUX, summer semester 2022

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Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Politics of Graves – Negotiations, Practice and Reactions about Fallen German Soldiers of World War Two and Their Resting Places in Russia
Janz, Nina UL

in Rydel, Jan; Trobst, Stefan (Eds.) Instrumentalizing the Past: The Impact of History on Contemporary International Conflicts (2022)

The coming to terms with the past is essential as a negotiating point in interstate relations, especially in the consequences of the Second World War. Not only the question towards compensation, guilt and ... [more ▼]

The coming to terms with the past is essential as a negotiating point in interstate relations, especially in the consequences of the Second World War. Not only the question towards compensation, guilt and victimhood but as well in numbers and losses of humans - and their remains. The dealing of the commemoration of the dead and their resting places makes an integral part in the history politics. After the end of the Soviet Union, the new Russian Federation signed an agreement with the Federal Republic of Germany on the war graves in both countries. Based on this document, the German War Grave Commission is allowed to work on the Russian territory, recovering, exhuming and building new cemeteries for the German dead. Its workflow and the access to the former soldier graves consist not without difficulties. Starting with the diplomatic and political issue of the traces of the Wehrmacht in Russia and the Soviet Union, continuing with gaining access and the permission for excavations and constructing new burial grounds in Russia, the work of the German organisation met obstacles, reservations and incomprehension. The cemetery constructions were restricted by local negotiations partners. Protests appeared by veterans and the local population. The fallen Wehrmacht soldiers, who attacked the Soviet Union and committed crimes against humanity, trigger very controversial discussions alongside the official Russian narrative of the Great Patriotic War. Based on the negotiations regarding the graves of the deceased, a policy about historical images arose, which can be interpreted as politics of graves [less ▲]

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See detailCrowdsourcing as “Live” Collection – Project Warlux – War Experiences in Luxembourg
Janz, Nina UL

Article for general public (2022)

In February 2021, a team at the Centre for Contemporary and Digital History at the University of Luxembourg launched a call for contributions as part of the project, “WARLUX – War Experiences in ... [more ▼]

In February 2021, a team at the Centre for Contemporary and Digital History at the University of Luxembourg launched a call for contributions as part of the project, “WARLUX – War Experiences in Luxembourg,” funded by the Luxembourgish Research Fund (Fond National de la Recherche). The team researches the personal side of the Luxembourgish war generation’s history. To uncover the individual experiences of these men, women and families, the team asked the public to share their family stories, letters, diaries, photographs, and other personal documents. The researchers aimed to enrich existing records of individual experiences, which had not yet been collected or published. While the crowdsourcing campaign was intended as complementary research material, we created a unique digital archive of personal memories and individual voices in the form of first-hand documents, a novelty in the cultural landscape in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailCROWDSOURCED ARCHIVES - PRIVATE ARCHIVES AND PERSONAL COLLECTIONS
Janz, Nina UL

Speeches/Talks (2022)

Data collections are essential for historical research. In addition to official archives and state institutions, collections from research institutions and private holders face different challenges in ... [more ▼]

Data collections are essential for historical research. In addition to official archives and state institutions, collections from research institutions and private holders face different challenges in creation and consistency, preservation and use. While most private collections are stored in official and state archives due to donations or the acquisition of private holdings, crowdsourcing data as private collections is a different approach. Crowdsourcing has become popular in Citizen Science and public history projects in the last decade. Although crowdsourcing is not (always) meant to create an archive, the data or contributions collected are an archive nonetheless. This paper aims to highlight the possibilities and pitfalls of crowdsourcing to build an archive of private origin. In February 2021, a team at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History at the University of Luxembourg launched a call for contributions to collect ego documents about the war generation. As part of the project, "WARLUX - War Experiences in Luxembourg", the team is researching the personal side of the history of the Luxembourgish war generation. To uncover the individual experiences of these men, women and families, the team asked the public to share their family stories, letters, diaries, photographs and other personal documents. The researchers aimed to enrich records on individuals, which had not yet been collected or published. While the crowdsourcing campaign was intended as complementary research material, we have created a unique digital archive of personal memories and individual voices in the form of first-hand documents and a novelty in the cultural landscape in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. In my presentation and paper, I will explore the possibilities of crowdsourced (digital) private archives, their pitfalls and challenges such as copyright and GDRP and sensitive information and its future implementation into official cultural institutions. [less ▲]

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See detailThe “Long” Arm of Military Justice: The arrest and resettlement of the families of military deserters
Janz, Nina UL; Vercruysse, Sarah Maya UL

Speeches/Talks (2022)

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg was de facto annexed and incorporated into the German Reich during the Second World War. The laws and ordinances of the Reich applied to the local population, and male ... [more ▼]

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg was de facto annexed and incorporated into the German Reich during the Second World War. The laws and ordinances of the Reich applied to the local population, and male residents were drafted into the Wehrmacht and thus subject to military jurisdiction. The main reason for Luxembourgers to be tried by the Wehrmacht courts was for disobeying orders, mostly desertion. Wehrmacht court records contain not only individual and personal information about the motives of the convicts and the findings of the court but also details about their families and backgrounds. As a result of deserting from the Wehrmacht, thousands of family members of deserters were resettled in East German territories such as Boberstein (Bobrów) in Poland, and their assets were confiscated. Given these men’s forced recruitment and non-German identity and the fact that they were being asked to fight for a foreign country that had invaded their home territory, the reasons for their desertion and disobedience are self-explanatory. However, this contribution will examine the efforts of the courts and the military justice administration to capture and arrest them, seizures made in their homeland and threats and arrests of their families. These efforts reflect the cooperation between military courts and local police forces used by the occupying authorities to terrorise the inhabitants of occupied territories and to put pressure on the men in the Wehrmacht not to defect. The contribution examines the consequences for individual soldiers and their families in occupied territories such as Luxembourg. It aims to use court records and trials, as well as the corresponding police files related to the interrogation and resettlement of families, to establish a link between persecuted soldiers and the consequences for their families, thereby showing the impact of the Nazi military machine on individuals during the Second World War. [less ▲]

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See detail"Mapping" biographies in relational databases - The case of Luxembourg soldiers in the Second World War
Janz, Nina UL

Scientific Conference (2022, July 25)

The Impact and Legacy of War Experiences in Luxembourg” researches the personal side of the history of Luxembourgish youth born between 1920 and 1927 who were enrolled into German services under the Nazi ... [more ▼]

The Impact and Legacy of War Experiences in Luxembourg” researches the personal side of the history of Luxembourgish youth born between 1920 and 1927 who were enrolled into German services under the Nazi occupation of Luxembourg during World War II. The research focuses on personal testimonies and their individual war experience to uncover these men, women, and families’ individual experiences. Using a relational database to represent their war experiences, we face several challenges, such as a data structure that is too rigid and strict to “map” the fluid and unpredictable life patterns of our study subjects. We developed a data model where we treat different life stations (military unit, POW camp etc.) as equal data levels like our recruits (as persons). Each “life station” or event we treat as a “person” and create a separate “biography” to include all relevant data. Afterwards, we link the life stations or events with the actual person in the database. The aim of my contribution is the “translation” of lives, with its twists and turns into a static data set such as a relational database to map the individual war experiences of our study object. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailIn Russischer Erde - Die Exhumierung toter deutscher Soldaten des Zweiten Weltkrieges in Russland durch den Volksbund Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge
Janz, Nina UL

in Rass, Christoph (Ed.) Konfliktlandschaften interdisziplinär lesen (2022)

Detailed reference viewed: 228 (3 UL)
See detailBetween fulfilling the legal mandate and clarifying the fate of dead soldiers of World War II - The efforts of a private association to exhume and identify German war dead
Janz, Nina UL

Speeches/Talks (2022)

Over one million German military dead of the Second World War are missing. The private association VDK Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge e.V. (VDK) is, as the German War Graves Commission the official ... [more ▼]

Over one million German military dead of the Second World War are missing. The private association VDK Deutsche Kriegsgräberfürsorge e.V. (VDK) is, as the German War Graves Commission the official representative of the German government responsible for the localisation and exhumation of German military graves, the identification of the dead, the reburial and the maintenance of military cemeteries worldwide. More than 75 years after the end of the violent conflict, the VDK has completed its work in Western Europe, but has continued its systematic search for graves and remains of German Wehrmacht soldiers in Eastern Europe, especially in the Russian Federation. The paper presents the localisation, recovery and identification of remains and uses a case study in Russia to discuss the complexity of German remains both in German society and politics and in the host country Russia. The difficulty in dealing with dead bodies marked as perpetrators and held responsible for inhumane crimes is only one challenge for the VDK. In addition, the paper reviews the hesitant use of DNA identification, the lack of interest in clarifying the fate of MIA soldiers in German post-war politics and the existing resentment towards Nazi dead, which delays or ignores the forensic processing of German war dead. [less ▲]

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See detailHERO? TRAITOR? VICTIM? AMBIGUITY OF DATA IN WAR BIOGRAPHIES
Janz, Nina UL

Presentation (2022, June 04)

Project WARLUX - Soldiers and their Communities in WWII: The Impact and Legacy of War Experiences in Luxembourg", at the Luxembourg Centre for Digital and Contemporary History (C²DH) of the University of ... [more ▼]

Project WARLUX - Soldiers and their Communities in WWII: The Impact and Legacy of War Experiences in Luxembourg", at the Luxembourg Centre for Digital and Contemporary History (C²DH) of the University of Luxembourg researches the personal side of the history of Luxembourgish youth born between 1920 and 1927 who were enrolled into German services under the Nazi occupation of Luxembourg during World War II. The research focuses on personal testimonies and their individual war experience to uncover these men, women, and families' individual experiences. The Methodology includes a biographical approach to offer a micro-historical perspective on single actors to link individual life stories to home communities. WARLUX will analyse the individuals from their social environments, social background, or trajectories during the war and their life in the post-war period based on their biographies. But this is almost where the most significant challenge lies in avoiding pre-existing terminologies, e.g. Nazi terms. When analysing the dataset of contemporary Nazi documents and post-war documents, the sources describe the same objects and elements but require a different interpretation. When building a dataset for independent and objective research, it is crucial to distinguish between the various sources and make the data entries comprehensible. While for the Nazis, volunteers in the Waffen-SS were "exemplary fighters", in post-war Luxembourg, they were "traitors to the fatherland". The young men who deserted from the Wehrmacht during the war, "cowards" and "Wehrkraftzersetzer" for the Nazis, in peacetime "heroes" of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. The project has worked with a relational database (nodegoat) so far but is reaching its limits. This database's strength lies in linking objects while assigning strict categories and dates but fails when it comes to flexible and uncertain or ambiguous data. In many sources, there are different variations of dates and circumstances of the targets under study. For example, the Nazi authorities introduced the conscription law in Luxembourg on 30 August 1942. Every man born between 1920 and 1927 was called to register on the conscription lists. Therefore, men who enlisted in the Wehrmacht before this date are considered volunteers, which completely changed their status as mentioned during the war and after returning home. Mapping this scheme in a data model seems "easy" - date of enlistment XX, and then building the category of volunteer yes/no. But as the data repeatedly shows, it is more complex than expected. Volunteers who joined the German forces before August 1942 tried to avoid their "real" enlistment and changed it to an earlier date (reporting to the authorities) because they were aware of the severe consequences they and their families faced after the surrender of the Nazi forces. There are now two dates in the dataset. The relational structure only allows one date for the volunteer "tab". If I had chosen only one date, this case would have been overlooked. The analysis requires a flexible and changeable dataset where the fixed points can be changed depending on the research question. It is always a challenge in historical research. Still, due to the mass data (10,000 objects/persons) that WARLUX uses, it needs a flexible and smooth data structure and, on the other hand, one that is as stringent and reliable as possible. [less ▲]

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See detailDIGITAL COLLECTION - DIGITAL COLLECTION of PROJECT WARLUX-Soldiers and their communities in WWII: The impact and legacy of war experiences in Luxembourg
Janz, Nina UL; Vercruysse, Sarah Maya UL

Speeches/Talks (2022)

In February 2021, a call for contributions was launched through the media (newspapers and radio) to collect ego-documents about the men, women and their families affected by the Nazi draft during the ... [more ▼]

In February 2021, a call for contributions was launched through the media (newspapers and radio) to collect ego-documents about the men, women and their families affected by the Nazi draft during the Second World War. The response was overwhelmingly successful, and the team received more than 200 calls and messages in the first few days. The collection phase (February to October 2021) involved visiting families to bring the originals to campus, where they were scanned and indexed. Interaction with donors and the public was a pivotal activity to enrich the personal documents with additional information about the individuals' backgrounds for an in-depth analysis. After completing the survey process, the team collected 160 collections (from 160 contributors), creating the central source of documentation for research into personal experiences of war. [less ▲]

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See detailThe foreign soldier’s transnational experience in the Nazi military. A biographical study of conscripts and volunteers from Luxembourg in the Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS and their military and individual experiences in WWII
Janz, Nina UL

Speeches/Talks (2022)

Coming from various occupied territories and uninvolved or neutral countries, such as Spain and Switzerland, over two million foreigners served in the ranks of the Wehrmacht and the Waffen-SS. These men ... [more ▼]

Coming from various occupied territories and uninvolved or neutral countries, such as Spain and Switzerland, over two million foreigners served in the ranks of the Wehrmacht and the Waffen-SS. These men had a significant impact on the war and on how it was experienced and conducted. How these men from more than 40 countries experienced the war in German uniform as transnational soldiers remains essentially unexamined. Focusing on those who came from Luxembourg, this paper traces the experiences of these soldiers, in order to provide a new perspective on the European experience of war. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Soviet Myth of World War II: Patriotic Memory and the Russian Question in the USSR, by Jonathan Brunstedt,
Janz, Nina UL

in Journal of Military History (2022), 68(2), 488-489

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See detailA Workshop on War Letters (in the Digital Age)
Janz, Nina UL; van der Lange, Milan

Report (2022)

Impressions of building a community around people working on the digitization of historical ‘egodocuments’ using Transkribus.

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See detailRadio - Talk Die Denazifizierung der Ukraine?
Jaschik, Johanna Maria UL; Janz, Nina UL

Speeches/Talks (2022)

n Europa ist ein Angriffskrieg ausgebrochen. Der Angriff auf einen souveränen und demokratischen Staat stellt einen Verstoß gegen das Völkerrecht dar. In einer Rede vom 24. Februar 2022 nimmt Wladimir ... [more ▼]

n Europa ist ein Angriffskrieg ausgebrochen. Der Angriff auf einen souveränen und demokratischen Staat stellt einen Verstoß gegen das Völkerrecht dar. In einer Rede vom 24. Februar 2022 nimmt Wladimir Putin, Präsident der Russischen Föderation, die Vergangenheit zum Anlass, den souveränen Staat Ukraine anzugreifen. Neben machtpolitischen Argumenten wie der Bedrohung durch die NATO wird die historische Vergangenheit der Ukraine und Russlands instrumentalisiert, um Putins politisches Handeln zu rechtfertigen. Die Historikerinnen der Universität Luxemburg, Johanna Jaschik und Nina Janz, verurteilen diese Falschaussagen und Putins freie Geschichtsinterpretation aufs Schärfste. [less ▲]

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See detailL’histoire du temps présent / Die Denazifizierung der Ukraine?
Jaschik, Johanna Maria UL; Janz, Nina UL

Article for general public (2022)

In Europa ist ein Angriffskrieg ausgebrochen. Der Angriff auf einen souveränen und demokratischen Staat stellt einen Verstoß gegen das Völkerrecht dar. In einer Rede vom 24. Februar 2022 nimmt Wladimir ... [more ▼]

In Europa ist ein Angriffskrieg ausgebrochen. Der Angriff auf einen souveränen und demokratischen Staat stellt einen Verstoß gegen das Völkerrecht dar. In einer Rede vom 24. Februar 2022 nimmt Wladimir Putin, Präsident der Russischen Föderation, die Vergangenheit zum Anlass, den souveränen Staat Ukraine anzugreifen. Neben machtpolitischen Argumenten wie der Bedrohung durch die NATO wird die historische Vergangenheit der Ukraine und Russlands instrumentalisiert, um Putins politisches Handeln zu rechtfertigen. Wir, Forscherinnen und Forscher der Universität Luxemburg, verurteilen diese Falschaussagen und Putins freie Geschichtsinterpretation aufs Schärfste. [less ▲]

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See detailThe European archival landscape – A Conference on access and prevention strategies in archives and the impact on historical research
Janz, Nina UL

Report (2022)

An international conference on “Strategies of Blockade. Access to Archive Records in France and Germany in an International Perspective” took place in January 2022 in Paris. Researchers from the C²DH ... [more ▼]

An international conference on “Strategies of Blockade. Access to Archive Records in France and Germany in an International Perspective” took place in January 2022 in Paris. Researchers from the C²DH presented the current archive situation in Luxembourg and its impact on research in contemporary history. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailIm Spannungsfeld zwischen Informationsfreiheit und Datenschutz: Das Luxemburger Archivgesetz von 2018 und die zeithistorische Forschung
Brüll, Christoph UL; Janz, Nina UL

Scientific Conference (2022, January 19)

Im Sommer 2018 trat in Luxemburg erstmals ein Archivgesetz in Kraft, das nach jahrelangen Verhandlungen – leider ohne Beteiligung der Archivnutzer*innen – zustande kam. Es war lange erwartet und ... [more ▼]

Im Sommer 2018 trat in Luxemburg erstmals ein Archivgesetz in Kraft, das nach jahrelangen Verhandlungen – leider ohne Beteiligung der Archivnutzer*innen – zustande kam. Es war lange erwartet und definierte für das Großherzogtum (endlich!), wie Quellen aus Ministerien und Verwaltungen archivalisch behandelt werden müssen. Das Gesetz schuf damit den Rahmen für eine notwendige und geregelte Ablieferungs- und Archivierungspolitik sowie den erforderlichen Einsatz von geschultem Personal in staatlichen und kommunalen Verwaltungen. Der Gesetzestext weist große Ähnlichkeiten mit bundesdeutschen und belgischen Bestimmungen zum Archivzugang auf. Die allgemeine Schutzfrist von 50 Jahren ist allerdings deutlich länger als in den meisten Ländern, wohingegen die 75-Jahre-Sperrfrist für Akten mit persönlichen Daten auf dem Papier kürzer ausfällt als bei den Nachbarn. Die Auslegung des Gesetzes durch das Nationalarchiv und die Ministerialverwaltungen war seitdem mehrmals Gegenstand von parlamentarischen Fragen und Presseberichterstattung, die die restriktive Zugangspraxis und lange Bearbeitungszeiten bei Anträgen auf Schutzfristverkürzung monieren. Den Forscher*innen fielen dabei zwei Dinge auf: zum einen wurde die Entscheidungsfrist für die Anträge auf Schutzfristverkürzungen regelmäßig deutlich überschritten; zum anderen legten die Archivmitarbeiter*innen ihren Entscheidungen, ob ein solcher Antrag vonnöten sei, ein extrem rigides Verständnis von „persönlichen Daten“ zugrunde. Dies verweist auf einige Grundprobleme bei der Konzeption des Gesetzes: die wissenschaftliche Forschung, die ein großes Interesse daran hatte, bei der Archivnutzung Rechtssicherheit zu haben, war zu keinem Zeitpunkt in den Gesetzgebungsprozess eingebunden. Zum anderen problematisierte dieser zu wenig die Tatsache, dass das Nationalarchiv historisch als eine kulturelle und nicht als eine wissenschaftliche Einrichtung betrachtet wurde. Dies war nach unserer Auffassung ein weiterer Grund dafür, dass die Perspektive der Forschung nicht ausreichend mitgedacht wurde. In der Praxis wird beispielsweise der Zugang zu Dokumenten aus der Zeit des Zweiten Weltkriegs noch regelmäßig erschwert; an eine zeitgeschichtliche Forschung zum Zeitraum ab den 1960er Jahren auf der Grundlage der im Nationalarchiv aufbewahrten Quellen ist kaum zu denken. Das Nationalarchiv nimmt eine restriktive Haltung gegenüber seinen Nutzer*innen ein: Inventare, wie z.B. vorläufige Abgabelisten, werden nicht vorgelegt, ganze Bestände werden wegen mangelnder Bearbeitung oder Unkenntnis der Zuständigkeiten gesperrt. Den Forscher*innen wird kein Vertrauen entgegengebracht. Es besteht beispielsweise keine Möglichkeit, Dokumente nach Zusicherung von Anonymisierung oder Unterzeichnung einer Verpflichtungserklärung einzusehen. Die Einsicht (falls gesperrt) bedarf noch immer teilweise der Zustimmung durch die Aktenproduzenten. Mitunter ist aber den Benutzern nicht klar, welche Akten noch dem Produzenten unterliegen oder nicht. In anderen Fällen ist selbst dem Archiv nicht klar, wer die „Zuständigkeit“ und damit das letzte Wort über den Zugang innehat. Solange aber das Archiv nicht die Benutzungshoheit oder die „Archivhoheit“ über seine eigenen Akten hat, kann keine professionelle Benutzung gewährleistet werden. In Bezug auf die Gemeindearchive gilt das Archivgesetz von 2018 nicht, daher ist dort die Verunsicherung sehr groß und es fehlt das Bewusstsein für eine geordnete Archivierung und Bereitstellung von Unterlagen. Es fehlen beispielsweise Benutzungsordnungen und professionelle Findmittel. Im Falle von Akteneinsichten müssen die Forscher mit der zuständigen Gemeinde eine Art Datenschutzvertrag (Convention de mise á disposition d’archives et collections) schließen, in welches jedes Dokument aufgelistet wird. Seitdem die Probleme mit dem Gesetz und seiner Anwendung bekannt sind, wurden regelmäßig Lösungsansätze diskutiert, die jedoch bisher nicht umgesetzt wurden. Zum einen wird angeregt, die Entscheidungen zu Schutzfristverkürzungen in die Hände des Nationalarchivs zu legen. Dazu wären, wie in anderen Ländern auch, Abkommen zwischen den Ministerialverwaltungen und dem Archiv nötig. In der Zwischenzeit ist jedoch Bewegung in die Sache gekommen: zumindest auf der politischen Ebene ist das Bewusstsein dafür, dass überhaupt ein Problem besteht, gewachsen. Im Raum steht derzeit eine Evaluierung des Gesetzes, die bisher nicht vorgesehen war – obwohl eine solche Vorgehensweise bei anderen Gesetzen regelmäßig praktiziert wird – und die mündlich signalisierte Bereitschaft der Justizministerin, für die ihr unterstellten Bereiche ein Abkommen mit dem Archiv zu schließen. Vielleicht kann so ein Paradox aufgelöst werden. [less ▲]

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See detailBurying the Dead from the Battle of the Bulge
Janz, Nina UL

Speeches/Talks (2022)

Casualties of soldiers in the German and American Army - During the Battle of the Bulge more than 100.000 soldiers died. How did the Wehrmacht, the U.S. Army and the Civilians treat the dead?

Detailed reference viewed: 58 (2 UL)