References of "Hubert Delisle, Maxime 50044224"
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See detailThe Best Space Resource is the One You Can Catch and Reuse
Hubert Delisle, Maxime UL; Yalcin, Baris Can UL; Martinez Luna, Carol UL et al

Poster (2022, May 03)

From the beginning of space exploration more than 60 years ago, only a few in-orbit objects have been removed or reused. In fact, the Kessler Syndrome states that the number of space debris is growing ... [more ▼]

From the beginning of space exploration more than 60 years ago, only a few in-orbit objects have been removed or reused. In fact, the Kessler Syndrome states that the number of space debris is growing exponentially [1], leaving unused uncooperative objects orbiting at high velocities at several altitudes, especially in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO). In other words, the situation brings up two main critical issues: not only a non-sustainable space environment for satellite missions, with orbit saturation, but also the creation of an unsafe place for future human-related space exploration missions. Active Debris Removal is a possible solution for tackling the problem of space debris. Despite being extremely challenging, catching autonomously and harmlessly an uncooperative object tumbling at high velocity demands reliability, compliance and robustness. The fruitful collaboration between industry and academia (Spacety Luxembourg - SnT-SpaceR research group at the University of Luxembourg), is leading to the cutting-edge concept of a two-step capturing mechanism. A first ‘soft capture’ ensures that the debris is received softly while dampening any vibrations generated during the contact. Then, a ‘hard capture’ secures the debris so that it would be deorbited or safely shipped for other orbits or space stations for reuse. Capturing debris and decommissioned in-orbit objects for recycling or reusing can be the anchor of new opportunities in space and beyond. Most of the objects in orbit can have aluminum parts, besides other beneficial materials among their subsystems, such as solar panels, antennas or electronics which can be reused. To maximize space resources reusability, it is important to not harm the target. Capturing solutions such as harpoons or rigid interfaces can cause damage to the targets, resulting in hardly exploitable resources, and even more smaller debris tumbling in orbit [2]. An application of the proposed capturing technology would be to collect defunct satellites and debris, thus contributing to a more sustainable environment in space, gathering those on a possible recycling orbit or to any future Space Station for recycling. References [1] Drmola J. and Hubik T., Kessler Syndrome: System Dynamics Model (2018), In-Space Policy, 44–45, 29–39 [2] Zhao P., Liu J. and Wu C., Survey on Research and Development of On-Orbit Active Debris Removal Methods (2020), Sci China Tech Sci, 63: 2188–2210 [less ▲]

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See detailET-Class, an Energy Transfer-based Classification of Space Debris Removal Methods and Missions
Yalcin, Baris Can UL; Martinez Luna, Carol UL; Hubert Delisle, Maxime UL et al

in Frontiers in Space Technologies (2022)

Space debris is positioned as a fatal problem for current and future space missions. Many e ective space debris removal methods have been proposed in the past decade, and several techniques have been ... [more ▼]

Space debris is positioned as a fatal problem for current and future space missions. Many e ective space debris removal methods have been proposed in the past decade, and several techniques have been either tested on the ground or in parabolic ight experiments. Nevertheless, no uncooperative debris has been removed from any orbit until this moment. Therefore, to expand this research eld and progress the development of space debris removal technologies, this paper reviews and compares the existing technologies with past, present, and future methods and missions. Moreover, since one of the critical problems when designing space debris removal solutions is how to transfer the energy between the chaser/de-orbiting kit and target during the rst interaction, this paper proposes a novel classi cation approach, named ET-Class (Energy Transfer Class). This classi cation approach provides an energy-based perspective to the space debris phenomenon by classifying how existing methods dissipate or store energy during rst contact. [less ▲]

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See detailHow to catch a space debris
Yalcin, Baris Can UL; Martinez Luna, Carol UL; Hubert Delisle, Maxime UL et al

Poster (2021, November 18)

The partnership between SpaceR and Spacety Luxembourg aims to develop cutting edge active space debris removal solutions that can be implemented into small cube sats The solution will take the advantage ... [more ▼]

The partnership between SpaceR and Spacety Luxembourg aims to develop cutting edge active space debris removal solutions that can be implemented into small cube sats The solution will take the advantage of latest advancements in many tech domains, such as gecko like sticky adhesives and energy efficient shape memory alloy materials. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 86 (34 UL)