References of "Hrabé de Angelis, Martin"
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See detailEuroPhenome: a repository for high-throughput mouse phenotyping data
Morgan, Hugh; Beck, Tim; Blake, Andrew et al

in Nucleic Acids Research (2010), 38(1), 577-585

The broad aim of biomedical science in the postgenomic era is to link genomic and phenotype information to allow deeper understanding of the processes leading from genomic changes to altered phenotype and ... [more ▼]

The broad aim of biomedical science in the postgenomic era is to link genomic and phenotype information to allow deeper understanding of the processes leading from genomic changes to altered phenotype and disease. The EuroPhenome project (http://www.EuroPhenome.org) is a comprehensive resource for raw and annotated highthroughput phenotyping data arising from projects such as EUMODIC. EUMODIC is gathering data from the EMPReSSslim pipeline (http://www.empress .har.mrc.ac.uk/) which is performed on inbred mouse strains and knock-out lines arising from the EUCOMM project. The EuroPhenome interface allows the user to access the data via the phenotype or genotype. It also allows the user to access the data in a variety of ways, including graphical display, statistical analysis and access to the raw data via web services. The raw phenotyping data captured in EuroPhenome is annotated by an annotation pipeline which automatically identifies statistically different mutants from the appropriate baseline and assigns ontology terms for that specific test. Mutant phenotypes can be quickly identified using two EuroPhenome tools: PhenoMap, a graphical representation of statistically relevant phenotypes, and mining for a mutant using ontology terms. To assist with data definition and cross-database comparisons, phenotype data is annotated using combinations of terms from biological ontologies. [less ▲]

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See detailV76D mutation in a conserved gD-crystallin region leads to dominant cataracts in mice.
Graw, Jochen; Loster, Jana; Soewarto, Dian et al

in Mammalian Genome (2002), 13(8), 452-5

During a large-scale ENU mutagenesis screen, a mouse mutant with a dominant cataract was detected and referred to as Aey4. Aim of this study was the morphological description of the mutant, the mapping of ... [more ▼]

During a large-scale ENU mutagenesis screen, a mouse mutant with a dominant cataract was detected and referred to as Aey4. Aim of this study was the morphological description of the mutant, the mapping of the mutation, and the characterization of the underlying molecular lesion. The slit-lamp examination revealed a strong nuclear cataract surrounded by a homogeneous milky opacity in the inner cortex. The histological analysis demonstrated remnants of cell nuclei throughout the entire lens. The mutation was mapped to Chromosome 1 by a genome-wide linkage making the six gamma-crystallin encoding genes and the closely linked betaA2-crystallin encoding gene to relevant candidate genes. Finally, a T-->A exchange in exon 2 of the gammaD-crystallin encoding gene (symbol: Crygd) was demonstrated to be causative for the cataract phenotype; this particular mutation is, therefore, referred to Crygo(Aey4). The alteration in codon 76 leads to an amino acid exchange of Val-->Asp. Val at this position is highly conserved; it is found in all mouse and rat gammaD/E/F-crystallins as well as in the human gammaA- and gammaD-crystallins. It may be replaced solely by Ile, which is present in all bovine gamma-crystallins, in the rat and mouse gammaA/B/C-crystallins, as well as in the human gammaB/C-crystallins. It is predicted that the exchange of a hydrophobic side chain by a polar and acidic one might influence the microenvironment by a dramatic decrease of the isoelectric point by 1.5 pH units in the 10 amino acids surrounding position 76. The Crygd(Aey4) additionally demonstrates the importance of the integrity of the Cryg gene cluster for lens transparency. [less ▲]

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See detailBeethoven, a mouse model for dominant, progressive hearing loss DFNA36.
Vreugde, Sarah; Erven, Alexandra; Kros, Corne J. et al

in Nature Genetics (2002), 30(3), 257-8

Despite recent progress in identifying genes underlying deafness, there are still relatively few mouse models of specific forms of human deafness. Here we describe the phenotype of the Beethoven (Bth ... [more ▼]

Despite recent progress in identifying genes underlying deafness, there are still relatively few mouse models of specific forms of human deafness. Here we describe the phenotype of the Beethoven (Bth) mouse mutant and a missense mutation in Tmc1 (transmembrane cochlear-expressed gene 1). Progressive hearing loss (DFNA36) and profound congenital deafness (DFNB7/B11) are caused by dominant and recessive mutations of the human ortholog, TMC1 (ref. 1), for which Bth and deafness (dn) are mouse models, respectively. [less ▲]

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