References of "Heinzle, Elmar"
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See detailProteomic Characterization of Primary Mouse Hepatocytes in Collagen Monolayer and Sandwich Culture.
Orsini, Malina; Sperber, Saskia; Noor, Fozia UL et al

in Journal of cellular biochemistry (2017)

Dedifferentiation of primary hepatocytes in vitro makes their application in long-term studies difficult. Embedding hepatocytes in a sandwich of extracellular matrix is reported to delay the ... [more ▼]

Dedifferentiation of primary hepatocytes in vitro makes their application in long-term studies difficult. Embedding hepatocytes in a sandwich of extracellular matrix is reported to delay the dedifferentiation process to some extent. In this study, we compared the intracellular proteome of primary mouse hepatocytes (PMH) in conventional monolayer cultures (ML) to collagen sandwich culture (SW) after 1 day and 5 days of cultivation. Quantitative proteome analysis of PMH showed no differences between collagen SW and ML cultures after 1 day. Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis were strongly affected by long-term cultivation in both ML and SW cultures. Interestingly, culture conditions had no effect on cellular lipid metabolism. After 5 days, PMH in collagen SW and ML cultures exhibit characteristic indications of oxidative stress. However, in the SW culture the defense system against oxidative stress is significantly up-regulated to deal with this, whereas in the ML culture a down-regulation of these important enzymes takes place. Regarding the multiple effects of ROS and oxidative stress in cells, we conclude that the down-regulation of these enzymes seem to play a role in the loss of hepatic function observed in the ML cultivation. In addition, enzymes of the urea cycle were clearly down-regulated in ML culture. Proteomics confirms lack in oxidative stress defense mechanisms as the major characteristic of hepatocytes in monolayer cultures compared to sandwich cultures. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-8, 2017. (c) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [less ▲]

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See detailHepatocytes of Wistar and Sprague Dawley rats differ significantly in their central metabolism.
Garg, Richa; Heinzle, Elmar; Noor, Fozia UL

in Journal of cellular biochemistry (2017)

Wistar and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats are most commonly used experimental rats. They have similar genetic background and are therefore, not discriminated in practical research. In this study, we compared ... [more ▼]

Wistar and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats are most commonly used experimental rats. They have similar genetic background and are therefore, not discriminated in practical research. In this study, we compared metabolic profiles of Wistar and SD rat hepatocytes from middle (6 months) and old (23 months) age groups. Principle component analysis (PCA) on the specific uptake and production rates of amino acids, glucose, lactate and urea indicated clear differences between Wistar and SD rat hepatocytes. SD rat hepatocytes showed higher uptake rates of various essential and non-essential amino acids, particularly in early culture phases (0-12 h) compared to later phases (12-24 h). SD hepatocytes seem to be more sensitive to isolation procedure and in vitro culture requiring more amino acids for cellular maintenance and repair. Major differences between Wistar and SD rat hepatocytes were observed for glucose and branched chain amino acid metabolism. We conclude that the observed differences in the central carbon metabolism of isolated hepatocytes from these two rats should be considered when using one or the other rat type in studies on metabolic effects or diseases such as diabetes or obesity. [less ▲]

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See detailIn Silico Modeling for the Prediction of Dose and Pathway-Related Adverse Effects in Humans From In Vitro Repeated-Dose Studies.
Klein, Sebastian; Maggioni, Silvia; Bucher, Joachim et al

in Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology (2016), 149(1), 55-66

Long-term repeated-dose toxicity is mainly assessed in animals despite poor concordance of animal data with human toxicity. Nowadays advanced human in vitro systems, eg, metabolically competent HepaRG ... [more ▼]

Long-term repeated-dose toxicity is mainly assessed in animals despite poor concordance of animal data with human toxicity. Nowadays advanced human in vitro systems, eg, metabolically competent HepaRG cells, are used for toxicity screening. Extrapolation of in vitro toxicity to in vivo effects is possible by reverse dosimetry using pharmacokinetic modeling. We assessed long-term repeated-dose toxicity of bosentan and valproic acid (VPA) in HepaRG cells under serum-free conditions. Upon 28-day exposure, the EC50 values for bosentan and VPA decreased by 21- and 33-fold, respectively. Using EC(10) as lowest threshold of toxicity in vitro, we estimated the oral equivalent doses for both test compounds using a simplified pharmacokinetic model for the extrapolation of in vitro toxicity to in vivo effect. The model predicts that bosentan is safe at the considered dose under the assumed conditions upon 4 weeks exposure. For VPA, hepatotoxicity is predicted for 4% and 47% of the virtual population at the maximum recommended daily dose after 3 and 4 weeks of exposure, respectively. We also investigated the changes in the central carbon metabolism of HepaRG cells exposed to orally bioavailable concentrations of both drugs. These concentrations are below the 28-day EC(10) and induce significant changes especially in glucose metabolism and urea production. These metabolic changes may have a pronounced impact in susceptible patients such as those with compromised liver function and urea cycle deficiency leading to idiosyncratic toxicity. We show that the combination of modeling based on in vitro repeated-dose data and metabolic changes allows the prediction of human relevant in vivo toxicity with mechanistic insights. [less ▲]

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See detail3D organotypic cultures of human HepaRG cells: a tool for in vitro toxicity studies.
Gunness, Patrina; Mueller, Daniel; Shevchenko, Valery et al

in Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology (2013), 133(1), 67-78

Drug-induced human hepatotoxicity is difficult to predict using the current in vitro systems. In this study, long-term 3D organotypic cultures of the human hepatoma HepaRG cell line were prepared using a ... [more ▼]

Drug-induced human hepatotoxicity is difficult to predict using the current in vitro systems. In this study, long-term 3D organotypic cultures of the human hepatoma HepaRG cell line were prepared using a high-throughput hanging drop method. The organotypic cultures were maintained for 3 weeks and assessed for (1) liver specific functions, including phase I enzyme and transporter activities, (2) expression of liver-specific proteins, and (3) responses to three drugs (acetaminophen, troglitazone, and rosiglitazone). Our results show that the organotypic cultures maintain high liver-specific functionality during 3 weeks of culture. The immunohistochemistry analyses illustrate that the organotypic cultures express liver-specific markers such as albumin, CYP3A4, CYP2E1, and MRP-2 throughout the cultivation period. Accordingly, the production rates of albumin and glucose, as well as CYP2E1 activity, were significantly higher in the 3D versus the 2D cultures. Toxicity studies show that the organotypic cultures are more sensitive to acetaminophen- and rosiglitazone-induced toxicity but less sensitive to troglitazone-induced toxicity than the 2D cultures. Furthermore, the EC50 value (2.7mM) for acetaminophen on the 3D cultures was similar to in vivo toxicity. In summary, the results from our study suggest that the 3D organotypic HepaRG culture is a promising in vitro tool for more accurate assessment of acute and also possibly for chronic drug-induced hepatotoxicity. [less ▲]

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See detailReal-time in situ viability assessment in a 3D bioreactor with liver cells using resazurin assay.
Mueller, Daniel; Tascher, Georg; Damm, Georg et al

in Cytotechnology (2013), 65(2), 297-305

Three-dimensional cultivation of human cells is promising especially for long-term maintenance of specific functions and mimicking the in vivo tissue environment. However, direct viability assessment is ... [more ▼]

Three-dimensional cultivation of human cells is promising especially for long-term maintenance of specific functions and mimicking the in vivo tissue environment. However, direct viability assessment is very difficult in such systems. Commonly applied indirect methods such as glucose consumption, albumin or urea production are greatly affected by culture conditions, stress and time of cultivation and do not reflect the real time viability of the cells. In this study we established a real-time in situ viability assay namely; resazurin assay, in a 3D hollow-fiber bioreactor using human liver cells. Resazurin assay is based on the conversion of resazurin to a fluorescent dye by cytoplasmatic and mitochondrial enzymes. We show that the resazurin reagent in concentrations used in this study is non-toxic and could be rapidly removed out of the system. Moreover, we observed that dead cells do not affect the results of the assay. We optimized the assay on HepG2 cells and tested it with primary human hepatocytes. Moreover, we maintained primary human hepatocytes in the 3D bioreactor system in serum-free conditions and also assessed viability before and after the exposure to amiodarone using the resazurin assay. We show that this approach is applicable during long-term cultivation of cells in bioreactors under different conditions and can moreover be applied to pharmacological studies, e.g. investigation of chronic drug effects in such 3D bioreactors. [less ▲]

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See detailDoxorubicin increases oxidative metabolism in HL-1 cardiomyocytes as shown by 13C metabolic flux analysis.
Strigun, Alexander; Wahrheit, Judith; Niklas, Jens et al

in Toxicological sciences : an official journal of the Society of Toxicology (2012), 125(2), 595-606

Doxorubicin (DXR), an anticancer drug, is limited in its use due to severe cardiotoxic effects. These effects are partly caused by disturbed myocardial energy metabolism. We analyzed the effects of ... [more ▼]

Doxorubicin (DXR), an anticancer drug, is limited in its use due to severe cardiotoxic effects. These effects are partly caused by disturbed myocardial energy metabolism. We analyzed the effects of therapeutically relevant but nontoxic DXR concentrations for their effects on metabolic fluxes, cell respiration, and intracellular ATP. (13)C isotope labeling studies using [U-(13)C(6)]glucose, [1,2-(13)C(2)]glucose, and [U-(13)C(5)]glutamine were carried out on HL-1 cardiomyocytes exposed to 0.01 and 0.02 muM DXR and compared with the untreated control. Metabolic fluxes were calculated by integrating production and uptake rates of extracellular metabolites (glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and amino acids) as well as (13)C-labeling in secreted lactate derived from the respective (13)C-labeled substrates into a metabolic network model. The investigated DXR concentrations (0.01 and 0.02 muM) had no effect on cell viability and beating of the HL-1 cardiomyocytes. Glycolytic fluxes were significantly reduced in treated cells at tested DXR concentrations. Oxidative metabolism was significantly increased (higher glucose oxidation, oxidative decarboxylation, TCA cycle rates, and respiration) suggesting a more efficient use of glucose carbon. These changes were accompanied by decrease of intracellular ATP. We conclude that DXR in nanomolar range significantly changes central carbon metabolism in HL-1 cardiomyocytes, which results in a higher coupling of glycolysis and TCA cycle. The myocytes probably try to compensate for decreased intracellular ATP, which in turn may be the result of a loss of NADH electrons via either formation of reactive oxygen species or electron shunting. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolic flux analysis gives an insight on verapamil induced changes in central metabolism of HL-1 cells.
Strigun, Alexander; Noor, Fozia UL; Pironti, Alejandro et al

in Journal of biotechnology (2011), 155(3), 299-307

Verapamil has been shown to inhibit glucose transport in several cell types. However, the consequences of this inhibition on central metabolism are not well known. In this study we focused on verapamil ... [more ▼]

Verapamil has been shown to inhibit glucose transport in several cell types. However, the consequences of this inhibition on central metabolism are not well known. In this study we focused on verapamil induced changes in metabolic fluxes in a murine atrial cell line (HL-1 cells). These cells were adapted to serum free conditions and incubated with 4 muM verapamil and [U-(1)(3)C(5)] glutamine. Specific extracellular metabolite uptake/production rates together with mass isotopomer fractions in alanine and glutamate were implemented into a metabolic network model to calculate metabolic flux distributions in the central metabolism. Verapamil decreased specific glucose consumption rate and glycolytic activity by 60%. Although the HL-1 cells show Warburg effect with high lactate production, verapamil treated cells completely stopped lactate production after 24 h while maintaining growth comparable to the untreated cells. Calculated fluxes in TCA cycle reactions as well as NADH/FADH(2) production rates were similar in both treated and untreated cells. This was confirmed by measurement of cell respiration. Reduction of lactate production seems to be the consequence of decreased glucose uptake due to verapamil. In case of tumors, this may have two fold effects; firstly depriving cancer cells of substrate for anaerobic glycolysis on which their growth is dependent; secondly changing pH of the tumor environment, as lactate secretion keeps the pH acidic and facilitates tumor growth. The results shown in this study may partly explain recent observations in which verapamil has been proposed to be a potential anticancer agent. Moreover, in biotechnological production using cell lines, verapamil may be used to reduce glucose uptake and lactate secretion thereby increasing protein production without introduction of genetic modifications and application of more complicated fed-batch processes. [less ▲]

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See detailIn-depth physiological characterization of primary human hepatocytes in a 3D hollow-fiber bioreactor.
Mueller, Daniel; Tascher, Georg; Muller-Vieira, Ursula et al

in Journal of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (2011), 5(8), 207-18

As the major research focus is shifting to three-dimensional (3D) cultivation techniques, hollow-fiber bioreactors, allowing the formation of tissue-like structures, show immense potential as they permit ... [more ▼]

As the major research focus is shifting to three-dimensional (3D) cultivation techniques, hollow-fiber bioreactors, allowing the formation of tissue-like structures, show immense potential as they permit controlled in vitro cultivation while supporting the in vivo environment. In this study we carried out a systematic and detailed physiological characterization of human liver cells in a 3D hollow-fiber bioreactor system continuously run for > 2 weeks. Primary human hepatocytes were maintained viable and functional over the whole period of cultivation. Both general cellular functions, e.g. oxygen uptake, amino acid metabolism and substrate consumption, and liver-specific functions, such as drug-metabolizing capacities and the production of liver-specific metabolites were found to be stable for > 2 weeks. As expected, donor-to-donor variability was observed in liver-specific functions, namely urea and albumin production. Moreover, we show the maintenance of primary human hepatocytes in serum-free conditions in this set-up. The stable basal cytochrome P450 activity 3 weeks after isolation of the cells demonstrates the potential of such a system for pharmacological applications. Liver cells in the presented 3D bioreactor system could eventually be used not only for long-term metabolic and toxicity studies but also for chronic repeated dose toxicity assessment. [less ▲]

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See detailToward preclinical predictive drug testing for metabolism and hepatotoxicity by using in vitro models derived from human embryonic stem cells and human cell lines - a report on the Vitrocellomics EU-project.
Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik; Andersson, Tommy B.; Alves, Paula M. et al

in Alternatives to laboratory animals : ATLA (2011), 39(2), 147-71

Drug-induced liver injury is a common reason for drug attrition in late clinical phases, and even for post-launch withdrawals. As a consequence, there is a broad consensus in the pharmaceutical industry ... [more ▼]

Drug-induced liver injury is a common reason for drug attrition in late clinical phases, and even for post-launch withdrawals. As a consequence, there is a broad consensus in the pharmaceutical industry, and within regulatory authorities, that a significant improvement of the current in vitro test methodologies for accurate assessment and prediction of such adverse effects is needed. For this purpose, appropriate in vivo-like hepatic in vitro models are necessary, in addition to novel sources of human hepatocytes. In this report, we describe recent and ongoing research toward the use of human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived hepatic cells, in conjunction with new and improved test methods, for evaluating drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. Recent progress on the directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells to the functional hepatic phenotype is reported, as well as the development and adaptation of bioreactors and toxicity assay technologies for the testing of hepatic cells. The aim of achieving a testing platform for metabolism and hepatotoxicity assessment, based on hESC-derived hepatic cells, has advanced markedly in the last 2-3 years. However, great challenges still remain, before such new test systems could be routinely used by the industry. In particular, we give an overview of results from the Vitrocellomics project (EU Framework 6) and discuss these in relation to the current state-of-the-art and the remaining difficulties, with suggestions on how to proceed before such in vitro systems can be implemented in industrial discovery and development settings and in regulatory acceptance. [less ▲]

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See detailCardiotoxicity testing using pluripotent stem cell-derived human cardiomyocytes and state-of-the-art bioanalytics: a review.
Mandenius, Carl-Fredrik; Steel, Daniella; Noor, Fozia UL et al

in Journal of applied toxicology : JAT (2011), 31(3), 191-205

In this article, recent progress in cardiotoxicity testing based on the use of immortalized cell lines or human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived cardiomyocytes in combination with state-of-the-art ... [more ▼]

In this article, recent progress in cardiotoxicity testing based on the use of immortalized cell lines or human embryonic stem cell (hESC) derived cardiomyocytes in combination with state-of-the-art bioanalytical methods and sensors is reviewed. The focus is on hESC-derived cells and their refinement into competent testing cells, but the access and utility of other relevant cell types are also discussed. Recent developments in sensor techniques and bioanalytical approaches for measuring critical cardiotoxicity parameters are highlighted, together with aspects of data evaluation and validation. Finally, recommendations for further research are given. [less ▲]

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See detailMetabolic profiling using HPLC allows classification of drugs according to their mechanisms of action in HL-1 cardiomyocytes.
Strigun, Alexander; Wahrheit, Judith; Beckers, Simone et al

in Toxicology and applied pharmacology (2011), 252(2), 183-91

Along with hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxic side effects remain one of the major reasons for drug withdrawals and boxed warnings. Prediction methods for cardiotoxicity are insufficient. High content screening ... [more ▼]

Along with hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxic side effects remain one of the major reasons for drug withdrawals and boxed warnings. Prediction methods for cardiotoxicity are insufficient. High content screening comprising of not only electrophysiological characterization but also cellular molecular alterations are expected to improve the cardiotoxicity prediction potential. Metabolomic approaches recently have become an important focus of research in pharmacological testing and prediction. In this study, the culture medium supernatants from HL-1 cardiomyocytes after exposure to drugs from different classes (analgesics, antimetabolites, anthracyclines, antihistamines, channel blockers) were analyzed to determine specific metabolic footprints in response to the tested drugs. Since most drugs influence energy metabolism in cardiac cells, the metabolite "sub-profile" consisting of glucose, lactate, pyruvate and amino acids was considered. These metabolites were quantified using HPLC in samples after exposure of cells to test compounds of the respective drug groups. The studied drug concentrations were selected from concentration response curves for each drug. The metabolite profiles were randomly split into training/validation and test set; and then analysed using multivariate statistics (principal component analysis and discriminant analysis). Discriminant analysis resulted in clustering of drugs according to their modes of action. After cross validation and cross model validation, the underlying training data were able to predict 50%-80% of conditions to the correct classification group. We show that HPLC based characterisation of known cell culture medium components is sufficient to predict a drug's potential classification according to its mode of action. [less ▲]

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See detailHigh throughput, non-invasive and dynamic toxicity screening on adherent cells using respiratory measurements.
Beckers, Simone; Noor, Fozia UL; Muller-Vieira, Ursula et al

in Toxicology in vitro : an international journal published in association with BIBRA (2010), 24(2), 686-94

A dynamic respiration assay based on luminescence decay time detection of oxygen for high throughput toxicological assessment is presented. The method uses 24-well plates (OxoDishes) read with the help of ... [more ▼]

A dynamic respiration assay based on luminescence decay time detection of oxygen for high throughput toxicological assessment is presented. The method uses 24-well plates (OxoDishes) read with the help of a sensor dish reader placed in a humidified CO(2)-incubator. Adherent primary rat hepatocytes and the human hepatic cell line Hep G2 were exposed to known toxic compounds. Dissolved oxygen concentration, a measure of respiration, was measured with an oxygen sensor optode immobilized in the centre of each well. The cells were maintained in the dishes during the assay period and can afterwards be processed for further analyses. This dynamic, non-invasive measurement allowed calculation of 50% lethal concentrations (LC(50)) for any incubation time point giving concentration-time-dependent responses without further manipulation or removal of the cells from the incubator. Toxicokinetic profiles are compared with Sulforhodamine B assay, a common cytotoxicity assay. The novel assay is robust and flexible, very easy to carry out and provides continuous online respiration data reflecting dynamic toxicity responses. It can be adapted to any cell-based system and the calculated kinetics contributes to understanding of cell death mechanisms. [less ▲]

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See detailAn integrated approach to improved toxicity prediction for the safety assessment during preclinical drug development using Hep G2 cells.
Noor, Fozia UL; Niklas, Jens; Muller-Vieira, Ursula et al

in Toxicology and applied pharmacology (2009), 237(2), 221-31

Efficient and accurate safety assessment of compounds is extremely important in the preclinical development of drugs especially when hepatotoxicity is in question. Multiparameter and time resolved assays ... [more ▼]

Efficient and accurate safety assessment of compounds is extremely important in the preclinical development of drugs especially when hepatotoxicity is in question. Multiparameter and time resolved assays are expected to greatly improve the prediction of toxicity by assessing complex mechanisms of toxicity. An integrated approach is presented in which Hep G2 cells and primary rat hepatocytes are compared in frequently used cytotoxicity assays for parent compound toxicity. The interassay variability was determined. The cytotoxicity assays were also compared with a reliable alternative time resolved respirometric assay. The set of training compounds consisted of well known hepatotoxins; amiodarone, carbamazepine, clozapine, diclofenac, tacrine, troglitazone and verapamil. The sensitivity of both cell systems in each tested assay was determined. Results show that careful selection of assay parameters and inclusion of a kinetic time resolved assay improves prediction for non-metabolism mediated toxicity using Hep G2 cells as indicated by a sensitivity ratio of 1. The drugs with EC(50) values 100 microM or lower were considered toxic. The difference in the sensitivity of the two cell systems to carbamazepine which causes toxicity via reactive metabolites emphasizes the importance of human cell based in-vitro assays. Using the described system, primary rat hepatocytes do not offer advantage over the Hep G2 cells in parent compound toxicity evaluation. Moreover, respiration method is non invasive, highly sensitive and allows following the time course of toxicity. Respiration assay could serve as early indicator of changes that subsequently lead to toxicity. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of drugs in subtoxic concentrations on the metabolic fluxes in human hepatoma cell line Hep G2.
Niklas, Jens; Noor, Fozia UL; Heinzle, Elmar

in Toxicology and applied pharmacology (2009), 240(3), 327-36

Commonly used cytotoxicity assays assess the toxicity of a compound by measuring certain parameters which directly or indirectly correlate to the viability of the cells. However, the effects of a given ... [more ▼]

Commonly used cytotoxicity assays assess the toxicity of a compound by measuring certain parameters which directly or indirectly correlate to the viability of the cells. However, the effects of a given compound at concentrations considerably below EC(50) values are usually not evaluated. These subtoxic effects are difficult to identify but may eventually cause severe and costly long term problems such as idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. We determined the toxicity of three hepatotoxic compounds, namely amiodarone, diclofenac and tacrine on the human hepatoma cell line Hep G2 using an online kinetic respiration assay and analysed the effects of subtoxic concentrations of these drugs on the cellular metabolism by using metabolic flux analysis. Several changes in the metabolism could be detected upon exposure to subtoxic concentrations of the test compounds. Upon exposure to diclofenac and tacrine an increase in the TCA-cycle activity was observed which could be a signature of an uncoupling of the oxidative phosphorylation. The results indicate that metabolic flux analysis could serve as an invaluable novel tool for the investigation of the effects of drugs. The described methodology enables tracking the toxicity of compounds dynamically using the respiration assay in a range of concentrations and the metabolic flux analysis permits interesting insights into the changes in the central metabolism of the cell upon exposure to drugs. [less ▲]

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