References of "Heinz, Andreas 50001959"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Peer Reviewed
See detailFamily in a multicultural context: Country report for Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Heinz, Andreas UL

in Albert, Isabelle; Emirhafizovic, Mirza; Shpigelman, Carmit-Noa (Eds.) et al Families and family values in society and culture (in press)

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a small country in the heart of Europe, neighbouring France, Germany and Belgium, counting on 1 January of 2019 613.894 inhabitants on a total area of 2,586 km² ... [more ▼]

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a small country in the heart of Europe, neighbouring France, Germany and Belgium, counting on 1 January of 2019 613.894 inhabitants on a total area of 2,586 km². Immigration and cultural diversity have become one of the key features in the last years as the share of foreigners has constantly increased to now 47% of the population (Statec, 2019). Recent migrants live on the territory along with ageing migrants who are now close to retirement, as well as earlier generations of migrants. Luxembourg can therefore today be characterized as super-diverse (Vertovec, 2007) and is seen as a sample case for European integration, certainly of high interest also regarding intergenerational family solidarity in the light of migration. We will outline the complex demographic picture in the following sections, focusing on socio-economic aspects as well as social policy issues and have then a closer look on intergenerational family solidarity and future areas of research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailWhat is problematic about binary questions on gender in health surveys – a missing answer analysis
Heinz, Andreas UL; Költő, András; Godeau, Emmanuelle et al

in Cogent Medicine (2020, December 04)

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some ... [more ▼]

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some participants may have understandable reasons for not reporting their gender, e.g. questioning their gender identity. Research question: How many students and which students do not answer the question on gender? Methods: We analyzed data of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children study from Ireland, France, Hungary, Scotland, Belgium (Flemish) and Luxembourg (n = 40,053). To explore the reasons for non-response, we divided the participants into 3 groups: 1. Responders answered both socio- demographic questions (age and gender) 2. age non-responders did not answer the question on age. 3. Gender non-responders answered the question on age, but not the one on gender. Results: 311 out of 40,053 (0.8%) pupils aged 11–18 did not report their gender. About 40% of them did not answer the age question either. However, the other 60% belong to the group of gender non-responders and this group is disadvantaged compared to responders: they report lower self-rated health, more health complaints, less family support and more substance use (alcohol, tobacco, cannabis). 1.9% of pupils did not answer the question about age. These age non-responders answered the questionnaire more selectively overall and skipped more questions. Conclusion: The data suggest that the reasons for age non-response and gender non-response are different. For age non-responders, the fear of de-anonymization seems to be the reason for not indicating their age. Not answering the question on gender is rare. If the participants answered the question on age, but not the question on gender, then the variable gender is missing not at random. The health problems of gender non-responders correspond to the health problems of gender non-conforming adolescents. Thus, the question arises if the group of gender non-responders should be included in the analysis and if the question on gender should be asked differently in the future [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 97 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMeasuring sex and gender identity in a cross-national adolescent population survey: Perspectives of adolescent health experts from 44 countries
Költő, András; Heinz, Andreas UL; Moreno-Maldonado, Concepcion et al

in Cogent Medicine (2020, December 04)

Introduction: The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) is a World Health Organization collaborative cross-cultural study of adolescents aged 11–15 years, from 50 countries and regions in Europe ... [more ▼]

Introduction: The Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) is a World Health Organization collaborative cross-cultural study of adolescents aged 11–15 years, from 50 countries and regions in Europe, North America and the former Soviet republics. Since 1983 (the first survey round), the sex/gender of the respondents have been categorised with the question “Are you a boy or a girl?”, the response options being “a boy” and “a girl”. In the light of lived experiences of young people and contemporary theoretical and empirical approaches to the measurement of sex assigned birth and gender identity, this item is contested.Research Questions: What are HBSC National Research Teams’ experiences with using this item? What is their position on any potential change or amendment of the item? Have they already made any changes? Do they see potential drawbacks and benefits in changing the item? Method: In Summer 2019, an online survey was conducted with HBSC National Teams, to under-stand member countries’ position on the measurement of sex and gender in the HBSC survey. Results: Of the 50 research teams, 44 responded to the online questionnaire. Opinions on potential changes or amendments of the item were polarised, with 19 teams (43%) not supporting any changes, 15 teams (34%) agreeing with a change, and 10 teams (23%) indicating they don’t know or not sure if changes are necessary. Various arguments were raised for and against any changes or amendments. Six national teams already implemented a change, by adding a third response option, replacing the item, or using additional items. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that the issue of sex and gender in HBSC needs to be addressed, but methodological, political and cultural implications need to be considered. The complexity of this problem makes it impossible to suggest a “one-size-fits-all” solution. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (3 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailScanning of questionnaires as a tool to identify difficult questions - lessons learned
Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Catunda, Carolina UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 10)

Background: In 2018, the Luxembourg HBSC team scanned the questionnaires to make the data available faster and to avoid entry errors. Scanning has been shown to be suitable for identifying difficult ... [more ▼]

Background: In 2018, the Luxembourg HBSC team scanned the questionnaires to make the data available faster and to avoid entry errors. Scanning has been shown to be suitable for identifying difficult questions. Objective: The presentation shows which questions were difficult to answer and what the difficulty was. Method: The questionnaires were scanned by student assistants and the data was validated by them if the scanning programme did not detect any errors. If errors occurred (e.g. missing answers or multiple answers), then these questionnaires were checked by HBSC team members. This gave us a systematic overview of which questions were difficult to answer. Results 1. The data from 10000 questionnaires were entered in 6 weeks (half the time needed compared to manual entry in 2014). 2. The MVPA question was frequently the subject of multiple answers. This may indicate that these students use the answer scale as a counting aid. 3. Students who state that they have never smoked in their lives often skip the question about tobacco use in the last month. This behaviour can be explained by Grice's conversational maxims. 4. Behaviours indicating that the answers are not serious (crossed-out questions, crosses outside the boxes, fun answers to open questions) are rare. Conclusions: Scanning is an efficient way to enter many questionnaires in a short time and high quality. Furthermore, it can help to discover difficult questions and to find out what the difficulty is. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (6 UL)
Full Text
See detailTrends from 2006-2018 in Health, Health Behaviour, Health Outcomes and Social Context of Adolescents in Luxembourg
Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Kern, Matthias Robert UL et al

Report (2020)

This report shows how 30 health indicators developed in the four Luxembourg HBSC surveys conducted in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018. There were positive trends especially in the health behaviour of the pupils ... [more ▼]

This report shows how 30 health indicators developed in the four Luxembourg HBSC surveys conducted in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018. There were positive trends especially in the health behaviour of the pupils: they smoke less and drink less alcohol. They also report more frequently that they brush their teeth regularly, eat more fruit and fewer sweets and consume fewer soft drinks. From 2006-2018, however, there were also deteriorations. For example, more pupils feel stressed from school and rate the climate among classmates worse. In addition, there are more pupils who are overweight and exercise less and more pupils report having psychosomatic health complaints. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 332 (65 UL)
Full Text
See detailSuicidal Behaviour in Youth in Luxembourg - Findings from the HBSC 2014 Luxembourg Study
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Report (2020)

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among young people worldwide. In order to prevent suicides, early identification of groups at risk is needed. In the Luxembourgish HBSC study, data on ... [more ▼]

Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among young people worldwide. In order to prevent suicides, early identification of groups at risk is needed. In the Luxembourgish HBSC study, data on suicidal behaviours among adolescents were collected in 2006, 2010 and 2014. These can be used to identify suicide risk factors and to develop comprehensive suicide prevention programs. In Luxembourg, the suicide rate has fluctuated around 15 deaths per 100 000 inhabitants per year, for more than ten years. In the period 2006 – 2016, 20 deaths were registered as suicide in the age group of 10 to 19-year-olds. These suicides represent approximately 19% of all deaths registered in this age group. In the Luxembourgish HBSC study conducted in 2014, 875 adolescents indicated to have contemplated suicide in the last 12 months, which amounts to 15.1% of the adolescents in the study. In the same year, 811 adolescents (14.0%) indicated to have made a suicide plan in the last 12 months, and 448 adolescents (7.7%) to have attempted suicide (at least once) in the last year. In first instance, bivariate logistic regressions analyses were conducted for 24 independent variables with three suicidal behaviours (contemplation of suicide, planning of suicide and suicide attempt) and sadness as dependent variables in order to identify potential risk factors. These risk factors were further tested in multivariate logistic regressions, in order to make a statement about the relevance of these factors for suicidal behaviour of adolescents in Luxembourg, while taking into account the dependence between the risk factors. Results from multivariate logistic regressions indicate that subjective health complaints are the most important risk factor for suicidal behaviour. Adolescents who have recurrent multiple health complaints are at higher risk for suicidal behaviour than adolescents who do not have health complaints. Life satisfaction is the second most important risk factor for suicidal behaviour. Adolescents with lower levels of life satisfaction are at higher risk for suicidal behaviour than adolescents who have higher levels of life satisfaction. Gender-specific analyses show that the risk factors differ between girls and boys for suicidal behaviour. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 273 (25 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSchool-Class Co-Ethnic and Immigrant Density and Current Smoking among Immigrant Adolescents
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Willems, Helmut UL

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020), 17(2),

Although the school-class is known to be an important setting for adolescent risk behavior, little is known about how the ethnic composition of a school-class impacts substance use among pupils with a ... [more ▼]

Although the school-class is known to be an important setting for adolescent risk behavior, little is known about how the ethnic composition of a school-class impacts substance use among pupils with a migration background. Moreover, the few existing studies do not distinguish between co-ethnic density (i.e., the share of immigrants belonging to one’s own ethnic group) and immigrant density (the share of all immigrants). This is all the more surprising since a high co-ethnic density can be expected to protect against substance use by increasing levels of social support and decreasing acculturative stress, whereas a high immigrant density can be expected to do the opposite by facilitating inter-ethnic conflict and identity threat. This study analyses how co-ethnic density and immigrant density are correlated with smoking among pupils of Portuguese origin in Luxembourg. A multi-level analysis is used to analyze data from the Luxembourg Health Behavior in School-Aged Children study (N = 4268 pupils from 283 classes). High levels of co-ethnic density reduced current smoking. In contrast, high levels of immigrant density increased it. Thus, in research on the health of migrants, the distinction between co-ethnic density and immigrant density should be taken into account, as both may have opposite effects. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (31 UL)
See detailSexual abuse of adolescents - methodological problems of victimisation surveys
Heinz, Andreas UL

Presentation (2020, January 15)

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (2 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSuicide Prevention: Using the Number of Health Complaints as an Indirect Alternative for Screening Suicidal Adolescents
Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

in Journal of Affective Disorders (2020), 260

Background: Suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescents. Screening for persons at risk usually includes asking about suicidal ideation, which is considered inappropriate in some societies ... [more ▼]

Background: Suicide is the second leading cause of death in adolescents. Screening for persons at risk usually includes asking about suicidal ideation, which is considered inappropriate in some societies and situations. To avoid directly addressing suicide, this paper investigates whether the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Symptom Checklist (HBSC-SCL), a validated non-clinical measure of eight subjective health complaints (e.g. headache, feeling low), could be used as a tool for screening suicidal ideation and behavior in adolescents. Methods: 5262 secondary school students aged 12-18 answered the Luxembourgish HBSC 2014 survey, including the HBSC-SCL items and suicidal ideation and behavior questions. Results: Each HBSC-SCL item correlates with suicidal ideation and behavior. A sum score was calculated ranging from zero to eight health complaints to predict respondents who considered suicide (area under the ROC curve = .770). The ideal cut-off for screening students who consider suicide is three or more health complaints: sensitivity is 66.3%, specificity is 75.9% and positive predictive value is 32.9%. Limitations: One limitation is HBSC-SCL's low positive predictive value. This is a general problem of screening rare events: the lower the prevalence, the lower the positive predictive value. Sensitivity and specificity could be improved by taking age-, gender- and country-specific cut-off values, but such refinements would make the score calculation more complicated. Conclusions: The HBSC-SCL is short, easy to use, with satisfactory screening properties. The checklist can be used when suicide cannot be addressed directly, and also in a more general context, e.g. by school nurses when screening adolescents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 229 (37 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailPrévention primaire
Barré, Jessica; Bejko, Dritan; Bendiane, Marc-Karim et al

in RAPPORT NATIONAL DU CANCER au Grand-Duché de Luxembourg 2020 (2020)

Le chapitre prévention primaire se concentre sur les facteurs de risques externes établis comme principaux, liés au mode de vie des personnes, à savoir le tabac, l’alcool, l’alimentation, l’activité ... [more ▼]

Le chapitre prévention primaire se concentre sur les facteurs de risques externes établis comme principaux, liés au mode de vie des personnes, à savoir le tabac, l’alcool, l’alimentation, l’activité physique et la surcharge pondérale et l’obésité, susceptibles d’engendrer un cancer. L’éducation à la santé joue un rôle important, afin d’amener les individus à adopter des comportements préventifs, dans l’objectif de prévenir une maladie ou de la détecter à un stade asymptomatique. Les données des enquêtes European Health Interview Survey (EHIS, étude pilotée par le Ministère de la Santé et le Luxembourg Institute of Health) et Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC, enquête coordonnée au Luxembourg par le Ministère de la Santé, le Ministère de l’Education nationale, de l’Enfance et de la Jeunesse, et l’Université de Luxembourg) ont été utilisées dans ce chapitre, pour compiler les données statistiques liées aux facteurs de risques. L’ensemble des comparaisons européennes est réalisé par Eurostat, (https://ec.europa.eu/), par l’étude internationale HBSC (http://www.hbsc.org/) et par le réseau international de chercheurs HBSC. Le chapitre se poursuit sur un descriptif des démarches de prévention mises en place sur le territoire national, au regard des facteurs de risques exposés au paragraphe 1, par exemple pour : Le tabac : Plan National de Lutte contre le Tabagisme (PNLT) 2016-2020, programme de sevrage tabagique (Ministère de la Santé/ Caisse Nationale de Santé), loi du 13 juin 2017 transposant la directive européenne 2014/40/UE sur les produits tabac ; L’alcool : Loi du 22 décembre 2006 portant interdiction de la vente de boissons alcoolisées à des mineurs de moins de seize ans, Plan d’Action Luxembourgeois de réduction du Mésusage de l’Alcool (PALMA) 2020-2024 ; L’alimentation et l’activité physique : Plan Cadre National « Gesond Iessen, Mei Bewegen » (PCN GIMB) 2018-2025. D’autres facteurs de risques additionnels ont par ailleurs été identifiés et font l’objet d’une prise en charge spécifique (ex : exposition au radon, recommandations de prescriptions en imagerie médicale, exposition aux UV, vaccination contre le HPV et l’hépatite B, exposition professionnelle à des agents cancérigènes…). Le rôle et les actions de la Direction de la Médecine Préventive de la Direction de la Santé, et de la Fondation Cancer, sont rappelés, dans ce cadre. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 46 (1 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPatterns of health related gender inequalities – a cluster analysis of 45 countries
Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

in Journal of Adolescent Health (2020), 66(6S), 29-39

Purpose: The paper explores gender inequalities between 45 countries across 10 health indicators among adolescents and whether those differences in health correlate with gender inequality in general ... [more ▼]

Purpose: The paper explores gender inequalities between 45 countries across 10 health indicators among adolescents and whether those differences in health correlate with gender inequality in general. Methods: Data from 71,942 students aged 15 years from 45 countries who participated in the 2018 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey were analyzed. For this purpose, 10 indicators were selected, representing a broad spectrum of health outcomes. The gender differences in the countries were first presented using odds ratios. Countries with similar risk profiles were grouped together using cluster analyses. For each of the 10 indicators, the correlation with the Gender Inequality Index was examined. Results: The cluster analysis reveals systematic gender inequalities, as the countries can be divided into seven distinct groups with similar gender inequality patterns. For eight of the 10 health indicators, there is a negative correlation with the Gender Inequality Index: the greater the gender equality in a country, the higher the odds that girls feel fat, have low support from families, have low life satisfaction, have multiple health complaints, smoke, drink alcohol, feel school pressure, and are overweight compared with boys. Four indicators show a divergence: the higher the gender equality in a country in general, the larger the differences between boys and girls regarding life satisfaction, school pressure, multiple health complaints, and feeling fat. Conclusions: Countries that are geographically and historically linked are similar in terms of the health risks for boys and girls. The results challenge the assumption that greater gender equality is always associated with greater health equality. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (12 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe influence of well-being, social support, media use and sociodemographic factors on problematic social media sue among Luxembourgish adolescents
van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Willems, Helmut Erich UL

in Cogent Medicine (2020), 7(1),

Background: Adolescents spend an increasing amount of time communicating online. Previous research has indicated that electronic media communication has been associated with positive outcomes on ... [more ▼]

Background: Adolescents spend an increasing amount of time communicating online. Previous research has indicated that electronic media communication has been associated with positive outcomes on adolescent well-being and development, however, problematic social media use is on the rise. This study investigates factors that influence problematic social media use (PSMU), based on previous empirical research and the Differential Susceptibility to Media Effects Model by Valkenburg and Peter (2013). Methods: The data used in this study stems from the 2018 Health Behaviour for School-aged Children (HBSC) study in Luxembourg. Data from elementary and secondary school students aged 11 to 18 was used (N = 6164), which was collected through a written survey. A four-stage hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted using SPSS, with problematic social media use as the dependent variable. 14 independent variables were included in the model, added in four blocks: sociodemographic factors, social support factors, well-being factors and media use factors.Results: The results indicate that in stage one of the hierarchical regression, the sociodemographic predictors accounted for 3% of the variation in problematic social media use. The addition of the social support factors to the model in stage two explained an additional 7% of the variation in problematic social media use, and the addition of the well-being factors in stage three an additional 5.3%. In stage four of the hierarchical regression media use factors were added to the model, and the four blocks of predictors accounted for 22.2% of the variation in problematic social media use (Adjusted R2 = 0.222). The most important predictors for problematic social media use were preference for online social interaction (β = 0.205, p < .001), the intensity of electronic media communication (β = 0.155, p < .001), psychosomatic complaints (β = 0.136, p < .001), perceived stress (β = 0.122, p < .001) and cyberbullying perpetration (β = 0.117, p < .001). Conclusions: The block of sociodemographic factors contributed minimally to the explanation of the variance in problematic social media use in the model. The most important predictors for problematic social media use were preference for online social interaction, the intensity of electronic media communication, psychosomatic complaints, perceived stress and cyberbullying perpetration. This suggests that there are several starting points for the prevention of problematic social media use among adolescents. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (10 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detail“What's a normal weight?” – Origin and receiving country influences on weight-status assessment among 1.5 and 2nd generation immigrant adolescents in Europe
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Stevens, Gonneke W.J.M. et al

in Social Science and Medicine (2020)

Many adolescents struggle with adequately assessing their weight-status, often leading to unnecessary weight-related interventions or preventing necessary ones. The prevalence of weight-status over- and ... [more ▼]

Many adolescents struggle with adequately assessing their weight-status, often leading to unnecessary weight-related interventions or preventing necessary ones. The prevalence of weight-status over- and underestimation differs considerably cross-nationally, suggesting that individual weight-status assessment is informed by cross-nationally differing standards of evaluation. For adolescents with a migration background, this brings up the possibility of a simultaneous influence of origin- and receiving country standards. The current study examines the magnitude of both influences using data from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. The cross-national design of the study enabled us to aggregate weight-evaluation standards for 41, primarily European, countries. Subsequently, we identified a sample of 8 124 adolescents with a migration background whose origin as well as receiving country participated in the study. Among those adolescents, we assessed the effects of origin and receiving country weight-evaluation standards using cross-classified multilevel regression analyses. Descriptive analyses revealed considerable differences in weight-evaluation standards between the countries. Regression analyses showed that both origin- and receiving country weight-evaluation standards were significantly associated cross-sectionally with weight-status assessment among the immigrant adolescents, with a stronger impact of receiving country standards. Results illustrate the context-sensitivity of adolescent weight-status assessment and reinforce the theoretical notion that immigrant adolescent development is not only informed by factors pertaining to their receiving country but also, albeit to a lesser extent, by those pertaining to their origin country. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 118 (12 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailCommunication with father and mother differently impacts suicidal behaviour
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Poster (2019, September)

Background: Positive relationships with parents can reduce the risk of suicidal behaviour in adolescents. Previous research has indicated that adolescents who report poor communication with their parents ... [more ▼]

Background: Positive relationships with parents can reduce the risk of suicidal behaviour in adolescents. Previous research has indicated that adolescents who report poor communication with their parents are more likely to display suicidal behaviour. The aim of this study is to find out whether communication with the father or mother is equally important for suicidal behaviour. Methods: A total of 5595 students aged from 12 to 18 years old in secondary school participated in the 2014 HBSC Luxembourg survey. They responded to a questionnaire including, among others: 4 questions regarding sadness, suicide ideation, planning and attempt, and 2 questions about ease of communication with their father and mother. Findings: Adolescents who indicate poorer communication with their mother or father have higher odds for all suicidal behaviours. Poor communication with fathers has a bigger influence on the odds for sadness, whereas poor communication with mothers has a bigger influence on the odds for attempted suicide. Lastly, adolescents who don`t have or don`t see their mother or father are at increased risk for the suicidal behaviours, although the odds are not as high as for those indicating very difficult communication with their parent(s). Discussion: The Luxembourgish findings confirm the results of previous research and go further showing that, as a determinant, communication with mother differs from the communication with father. More studies should confirm these findings and include other variables, such as social support and stress, in order to see their relation with the communication with both parental figures and suicidal behaviours. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 51 (3 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTrends in cannabis consumption among youth in Luxembourg
Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, September)

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other ... [more ▼]

Background: Cannabis is the most widely consumed illegal drug worldwide. Among adolescents, cannabis use is a risk factor for cognitive decline, mental illness, social problems, and the use of other psychoactive drugs. The current study presents trends in cannabis consumption among adolescents in Luxembourg. Methods: The Health Behaviour in School Aged Children (HBSC) Study in Luxembourg collected data in 2006, 2010, 2014 and 2018 using a standardized paper-pencil questionnaire. In total, 23,346 secondary schools students aged 11 to 18 years old (M=15.51, SD=1.53) responded to questions on cannabis, tobacco and alcohol consumption (lifetime and the past 30 days). Findings: In general, students who never used cannabis significantly increased over the four HBSC study waves (78%, 81.2%, 81%, 84%), whereas trends are similar for boys (74.5%, 77%, 78.2%, 81.4%), but not for girls (81.5%, 85%, 83.2%, 86.3%). Cannabis use (past 30 days) significantly differ for girls (94.1%, 94.1%, 92.8%, 93.7%), but not in general (91.7%, 92%, 90.9%, 91.7%), neither for boys (89.3%, 90.1%, 88.6%, 89.6%). Discussion: Cannabis lifetime use remains high for both genders. While consumption in the last 30 days remained stable for boys, it increased for girls over the past years. Tailored preventive interventions, based on health psychological models, are essential to educate adolescents about the social-cognitive risks of cannabis use and strengthen their capacities and resilience to resist experimental drug use and social pressure. In a context where legalization policies are discussed in various European countries, e-health approaches, for example, could be widely implemented in a cost-effective manner. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 121 (4 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detail"Are you a boy or girl?" Who are the non-responders
Heinz, Andreas UL; Catunda, Carolina UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 20)

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some ... [more ▼]

Background: In many studies, participants who do not state their gender are excluded from the analysis. This may be appropriate if they do not answer the questionnaire seriously. However, some participants may have understandable reasons for not reporting their gender, e.g. questioning their gender identity. Objective: How many students and which students do not answer the question on gender? Methods: HBSC 2018 raw data from Ireland, Luxembourg, Belgium and France are compared. To explore the reasons for non-response, we divided the participants into 3 groups: 1. Responders answered both sociodemographic questions (age and gender) 2. age non-responders did not answer the question on age. 3. Gender non-responders answered the question on age, but not the one on gender. Results: Between 0.8% (Ireland) and 1.2% (Luxembourg) of participants did not report their gender. About half of them did not answer the age question either. However, the other half belong to the group of gender non-responders and this group is disadvantaged compared to responders: they report lower life satisfaction, lower self-rated health, more health complaints, less peer support and their WHO-5 Well-being score is lower. Not answering the question on gender is rare. If the participants answered the question on age, but not the question on gender, then the variable gender is missing not at random. Implication: The question arises whether the group of gender non-responders should be included in the analysis and whether the question on gender should be asked differently in the future. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 169 (16 UL)
See detail„What’s a normal weight?“ – Weight assessment standards in Origin- and Receiving Country and Immigrant Adolescents’ Weight-Status Self-Assessment
Kern, Matthias Robert UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; Stevens, Gonneke et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June 19)

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight ... [more ▼]

Background: Many young people struggle with correctly assessing their weight-status, often leaving over- or underweight to go unnoticed thereby preventing adequate intervention. The prevalence of weight-status misperception differs considerably cross-nationally, indicating that individual weight-status assessment is informed by culturally transmitted standards of evaluation. For adolescents with a migration background, this brings up the problem of multiple frames of reference, as their perception of weight-status may be influenced by different cultural standards. Objective: We investigate the extent to which the assessment of one's own weight-status is based on standards of the heritage country or the receiving country. Methods: Data are retrieved from the 2014 Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study. The cross-national design of the study enabled us to aggregate weight-evaluation standards for 41 countries and subsequently identify a large sample of 8132 immigrant adolescents in 23 receiving countries from 41 heritage countries. The influence of heritage- and receiving country standards of evaluation was assessed using cross-classified multilevel models. Results: Descriptive analyses reveal considerable differences in weight-evaluation standards between the countries. We find evidence of a significant influence of both heritage- and receiving culture standards of evaluation, with a stronger impact of receiving culture standards. Stratified analyses reveal a stronger influence of heritage culture standards among first- than among second-generation immigrants, and a stronger influence of receiving culture standards among second- than among first-generation immigrants. Conclusions: The results corroborate our expectations regarding the persistency of cultural standards and help to understand inter-ethnic differences in weight-status assessment. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 89 (11 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailIs Life Satisfaction Contagious?
Catunda, Carolina UL; Heinz, Andreas UL; van Duin, Claire UL et al

Scientific Conference (2019, June)

Background: Life satisfaction (LS) is a major component of adolescents’ subjective well-being, facilitating adaptive development and influencing health. Literature shows that social support influences ... [more ▼]

Background: Life satisfaction (LS) is a major component of adolescents’ subjective well-being, facilitating adaptive development and influencing health. Literature shows that social support influences adolescents LS. In addition, the social network can affect health-related behaviors of adults - individuals that smoke or exercise tend to group together. However, the effects of others` LS on adolescents’ individual evaluation of LS (the contagion hypothesis) is still to be addressed. Objective(s): To test the contagion hypothesis of adolescents’ life satisfaction (how LS of proxies influences the individual LS appraisal). Method: Data is from 9738 students (aged 9-20) from the 2018 HBSC Luxembourg survey. A multilevel analysis was used to evaluate LS, with the school classes as subjects (model 1) to estimate the influence of being in a certain school class. Later, FAS, age and gender were entered as control variables (model 2). Results: The grand mean (intercept) for LS in model 1 was 7.57 (SE=.03, p<.001). For model 2, FAS (b=.47, SE=.03, p<.001), age (b=-.14, SE=.01, p<.001) and gender (b=-.23, SE=.04, p<.001) were significantly predictive of LS. The grand mean for LS, conditioned on the presence of FAS, age and gender, was 9.02 (SE=.05, p<.001). Interclass Correlation Coefficient decreased from model 1 (ICC=.08) to model 2 (ICC=.04). Conclusions: Results suggest that part of the variance of LS can be explained by the school class level. In other words, school class clusters have an influence on their LS, indicating that the LS of adolescents from a class partially accounts for individual LS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (7 UL)