References of "Heathcote, Lauren C."
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See detailThe time course of attentional biases in pain : a meta-analysis of eye tracking studies
Jones, Emma Blaisdale; Sharpe, Louise; Andrews, Sally et al

in PAIN (2021)

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See detailAttentional biases in pediatric chronic pain : an eye-tracking study assessing the nature of the bias and its relation to attentional control
Soltani, Sabine; van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL; Vervoort, Tine et al

in PAIN (2020), 161(10), 2263--2273

Attentional biases are posited to play a key role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain in adults and youth. However, research to date has yielded mixed findings, and few studies have ... [more ▼]

Attentional biases are posited to play a key role in the development and maintenance of chronic pain in adults and youth. However, research to date has yielded mixed findings, and few studies have examined attentional biases in pediatric samples. This study used eye-gaze tracking to examine attentional biases to pain-related stimuli in a clinical sample of youth with chronic pain and pain-free controls. The moderating role of attentional control was also examined. Youth with chronic pain (n = 102) and pain-free controls (n = 53) viewed images of children depicting varying levels of pain expressiveness paired with neutral faces while their eye gaze was recorded. Attentional control was assessed using both a questionnaire and a behavioural task. Both groups were more likely to first fixate on high pain faces but showed no such orienting bias for moderate or low pain faces. Youth with chronic pain fixated longer on all pain faces than neutral faces, whereas youth in the control group exhibited a total fixation bias only for high and moderate pain faces. Attentional control did not moderate attentional biases between or within groups. The results lend support to theoretical models positing the presence of attentional biases in youth with chronic pain. Further research is required to clarify the nature of attentional biases and their relationship to clinical outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detailAttention bias modification training for adolescents with chronic pain: A randomized placebo-controlled trial
Heathcote, Lauren C; Jacobs, Conrad; Van Ryckeghem, Dimitri UL et al

in Pain (2018), 159(2), 239-251

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See detailThe relationship between adolescents' pain catastrophizing and attention bias to pain faces is moderated by attention control.
Heathcote, Lauren C.; Vervoort, Tine; Eccleston, Christopher et al

in Pain (2015), 156(7), 1334-41

This study considered the attentional functioning of adolescents with varying levels of pain catastrophizing. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between pain catastrophizing and attention bias ... [more ▼]

This study considered the attentional functioning of adolescents with varying levels of pain catastrophizing. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between pain catastrophizing and attention bias to pain facial expressions. Furthermore, drawing on dual process models in the context of pain, we investigated the moderating role of attention control on this relationship. Adolescents (N = 73; age, 16-18 years) performed a dot-probe task in which facial expressions of pain and neutral expressions were presented for 100 milliseconds and 1250 milliseconds. Participants also completed self-report pain catastrophizing and attention control measures. We found that although there was no main effect of pain catastrophizing on attention bias towards pain faces, attention control did significantly moderate this relationship. Further analysis revealed that lower levels of attention control were significantly associated with increasing attentional vigilance towards pain faces only within high catastrophizing adolescents. In addition, we found that poorer attention control was related to increased attention bias for pain faces (regardless of pain catastrophizing level) when these faces were presented for relatively longer durations (ie, 1250 milliseconds) but not for short durations (ie, 100 milliseconds). This study supports a dual process model of attentional processes in pain, thus replicating previous findings within the psychopathology literature but extending them to the study of pain. Theoretical and clinical implications of our findings are discussed. [less ▲]

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