References of "Hanas, R"
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See detailUse of continuous glucose monitoring in children and adolescents
Phillip, M.; Danne, T.; Shalitin, S. et al

in Pediatric Diabetes (2012), 13(3), 215-228

[No abstract available]

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See detailInsulin delivery by injection in children and adolescents with diabetes
Hanas, R.; De Beaufort, Carine UL; Hoey, H. et al

in Pediatric Diabetes (2011), 12(5), 518-526

Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin, which has traditionally been delivered by vial and syringe. However, for many patients, dosing inaccuracy, pain, anxiety, inconvenience, and social acceptability ... [more ▼]

Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin, which has traditionally been delivered by vial and syringe. However, for many patients, dosing inaccuracy, pain, anxiety, inconvenience, and social acceptability present barriers to this method of administration (1-5). This has contributed to the increased popularity of alternative insulin delivery systems, including pen delivery devices (4, 6). Evidence suggests that discreet devices, such as insulin pens, facilitate adherence to intensive insulin therapy regimens, help improve lifestyle flexibility, and reduce injection pain compared with the conventional syringe-based regimens, as shown in studies in adults and adolescents (7). In addition, compared with the vial and syringe method of insulin administration, pens may provide more accurate dosing - which is particularly important in children - thereby improving short-term blood glucose control and potentially improving long-term outcomes (5, 8). Children, in particular, may benefit from insulin pens that are simple to use as adherence issues may be more evident in this patient group (9). Pens for insulin delivery in children with type 1 diabetes have been used for a long time in Europe, and have recently gained in popularity in many other places around the world (4, 10). Furthermore, the conventional vial and syringe method of insulin delivery is beginning to be considered as obsolete (11). Moreover, there is a continued drive to improve insulin pen technology, to refine and enhance the functionality and usability of these pens. However, despite recent advances in pen design and function, the selection of pens available especially for children is limited. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. [less ▲]

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See detailA cross-sectional international survey of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) in 377 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus from 10 countries
Danne, T.; Battelino, T.; Kordonouri, O. et al

in Pediatric Diabetes (2005), 6

OBJECTIVE: To document current practices using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by downloading electronically the 90-d pump data held within the pump memory and relating that to clinical ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: To document current practices using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) by downloading electronically the 90-d pump data held within the pump memory and relating that to clinical data from children and adolescents in different pediatric diabetes centers from Europe and Israel. METHODS: Data of patients (1-18 yr) treated with CSII in 23 centers from nine European countries and Israel were recorded with the encapture software (PEC International, Frankfurt, Germany). The number of patients who participated was 377 (48% female; mean diabetes duration +/- SD: 6.8 +/- 3.7 yr; age: 12.9 +/- 3.8 yr, preschool n = 33; prepubertal n = 95; adolescent n = 249; CSII duration: 1.6 +/- 1.2 yr; local HbA1c: 8.1 +/- 1.2%). RESULTS: The total insulin dose was lower than previously reported for injection therapy (0.79 +/- 0.20 U/kg/d). Covariance coefficient of daily total insulin was high in all age groups (adolescents 19 +/- 9%, prepubertal 18 +/- 8 and preschool 17 +/- 8). The distribution of basal insulin infusion rates over 24 hr (48 +/- 12% of total dose) varied significantly between centers and age groups. The number of boluses per day (7 +/- 3) was not significantly different between the age groups (average daily bolus amount: 0.42 +/- 0.16 U/kg). The rate of severe hypoglycemia (coma/convulsions) was 12.4 episodes per 100 patient-years and the number of diabetes-related hospital days was 124 per 100 patient-years. DISCUSSION: Pediatric CSII patients show a high variability in their insulin therapy. This relates both to age-dependent differences in the distribution of basal insulin as to the age-independent day-to-day variation in prandial insulin. [less ▲]

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