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See detailConversion from video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) to thoracotomy during major lung resection: how does it affect perioperative outcomes?
Seitlinger, Joseph; Olland, Anne; Guinard, Sophie et al

in Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery (2020)

Objectives: Since video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was first performed in the early 1990s, there have been many developments, and the conversion rate has decreased over the years. This article ... [more ▼]

Objectives: Since video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) was first performed in the early 1990s, there have been many developments, and the conversion rate has decreased over the years. This article highlights the specific outcomes of patients undergoing conversion to thoracotomy despite initially scheduled VATS lung resection. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 501 patients who underwent thoracoscopic anatomic lung resection (i.e. lobectomy, segmentectomy or bilobectomy) between 1 January 2012 and 1 August 2017 at our institution. We explored the risk factors for surgical conversion and adverse events occurring in patients who underwent conversion to thoracotomy. Results: A total of 44/501 patients underwent conversion during the procedure (global rate: 8.8%). The main reasons for conversion were (i) anatomical variation, adhesions or unexpected tumour extension (37%), followed by (ii) vascular causes (30%) and (iii) unexpected lymph node invasion (20%). The least common reason for conversion was technical failure (13%). We could not identify any specific risk factors for conversion. The global complication rate was significantly higher in converted patients (40.9%) than in complete VATS patients (16.8%) (P = 0.001). Postoperative atrial fibrillation was a major complication in converted patients (18.2%) [odds ratio (OR) 5.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.80-13.27; P = 0.001]. Perioperative mortality was higher in the conversion group (6.8%) than in the VATS group (0.2%) (OR 33.3, 95% CI 3.4-328; P = 0.003). Conclusions: Through the years, the global conversion rate has dramatically decreased to <10%. Nevertheless, patients who undergo conversion represent a high-risk population in terms of complications (40.9% vs 16.8%) and perioperative mortality (6.8% vs 0.2%). [less ▲]

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See detailSurgical Stabilization for Multiple Rib Fractures: Whom the Benefit? -A Prospective Observational Study
Olland, Anne; Puyraveau, Marc; Guinard, Sophie et al

in Journal of Thoracic Disease (2019)

Background: Surgical repair has demonstrated a beneficial effect on outcome for patients presenting with flail chest or with multiple rib fractures. We hypothesized that benefit on outcome parameters ... [more ▼]

Background: Surgical repair has demonstrated a beneficial effect on outcome for patients presenting with flail chest or with multiple rib fractures. We hypothesized that benefit on outcome parameters concerns predominantly patients being extubated within 24 hours post-operatively. Methods: We prospectively recorded all patients presenting with chest traumatism eligible for surgical repair with anticipated early extubation according to our institutional consensus (flail chest, major deformity, poor pain control, associated lesions requiring thoracotomy). We compared outcomes of patients extubated within 24 hours post-operatively to those who required prolonged ventilator support. We tested predictive factors for prolonged intubation with univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: From 2010 to 2014, 132 patients required surgical repair. Two thirds were extubated within 24 hours following surgical repair. Pneumonia was the main complication and occurred in 30.3% of all patients. Patients extubated within 24 hours following surgical repair had significantly shorter ICU stay and shorter in-hospital stay (P<0.0001 both). Pneumonia occurred significantly more often in patients with longer mechanical ventilation (over 24 hours) (P<0.0001) and the overall post-operative complications rate was higher (P=0.0001). Main independent risk factors for delayed extubation were bilateral chest rib fractures and initially associated pneumothorax. Conclusions: We conclude that patients extubated within 24 hours after repair have an improved outcome with reduced complication rate and shorter hospital stay. The initial extent of the trauma is an important risk factor for delayed extubation and high complication rate despite surgical stabilization. [less ▲]

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