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See detailThe Pandemic Worsens Europe’s Housing Problems
Flynn, Lindsay UL

in Current History (2022), 121(833), 83-89

Housing is a flash point in many European countries, with protests erupting and citizens voting to wrench properties from big investors. Inequality is driving the explosive debate, as households across ... [more ▼]

Housing is a flash point in many European countries, with protests erupting and citizens voting to wrench properties from big investors. Inequality is driving the explosive debate, as households across the income distribution face very different kinds of challenges and opportunities in today’s unequal housing markets. The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified the risks and rewards already present across different subgroups. This housing-generated inequality creates a conundrum for governments that must balance the interests of competing constituencies with complex housing markets, and points to fundamental questions about how to order society. [less ▲]

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See detailPost-crisis developments in young adults’ housing wealth
Dewilde, Caroline; Flynn, Lindsay UL

in Journal of European Social Policy (2021), 31(5), 580-596

How has housing wealth inequality changed for young-adult households in the post-financial crisis period, and what is driving such change? We chart a path for subsequent studies by analysing the ... [more ▼]

How has housing wealth inequality changed for young-adult households in the post-financial crisis period, and what is driving such change? We chart a path for subsequent studies by analysing the previously unexamined post-crisis housing wealth profile of young adults via different angles and using multiple inequality measures. Using household micro-data for 11 European countries (Household Finance and Consumption Survey, 2010–2017) and the United States (Survey of Consumer Finances, 2010–2016), we find that the accumulation of housing assets for 22–44 year olds is unevenly concentrated among high-income homeowners, over and above what would be expected given the well-known decline in homeownership. We describe and assess several potential drivers for these wealth profile changes, finding that the current explanations offered in the literature do not adequately account for the unequal wealth profile of young people. We conclude that a mix of dynamics, including housing market volatility, housing market configurations leading to uneven capital gains and losses, and the increased social selectivity of homeownership intersect to shape the ways that young adults navigate the housing market in post-crisis times. [less ▲]

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See detailHousing crisis: How can we improve the situation for young people?
Flynn, Lindsay UL

in Intergenerational Justice Review (2020), 6(1),

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See detailThe Young and the Restless : Housing Access in the Critical Years
Flynn, Lindsay UL

in West European Politics (2020), 43(2), 321-343

How do governmental housing policies affect the ability of young people to exit the parental home? This paper makes three claims. First and most important, governments that create accessible and liquid ... [more ▼]

How do governmental housing policies affect the ability of young people to exit the parental home? This paper makes three claims. First and most important, governments that create accessible and liquid mortgage markets make it easier for young people to launch from the parental home. Second, even in those countries with more liquid housing markets, younger generations today still have an increasingly difficult time realising their preferences compared to prior generations. Third, increasing income and wealth inequality interacts with housing markets to create this uneven playing field both within and across generations. This paper examines these relationships in 20 high-income OECD countries. Fewer adult children live in the parental home in countries with deep mortgage markets, high levels of social rented housing, tax relief for ownership, low buyers’ transaction costs and high residential mobility. These countries cut across the traditional housing regime typologies, highlighting the need for additional housing-specific theory building. [less ▲]

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See detailEditorial
Flynn, Lindsay UL

in Intergenerational Justice Review (2020), 6(1), 3

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See detailI’ll Just Stay Home: Employment Inequality among Parents
Flynn, Lindsay UL

in Social Politics: International Studies in Gender, State, and Society (2019), 26(3), 394-418

How does homeownership magnify existing gender disparities in the labor markets of the rich OECD countries? Men and women, and especially mothers and fathers, respond to homeownership differently. Owners ... [more ▼]

How does homeownership magnify existing gender disparities in the labor markets of the rich OECD countries? Men and women, and especially mothers and fathers, respond to homeownership differently. Owners work more hours than renters but mothers experience an ownership penalty while fathers solidify their market attachment. Both responses increase the gender gap. As such, governments pursuing dual policy objectives of promoting homeownership and greater gender parity in the labor market will find their policies working at cross-purposes. This paper analyzes the effect of homeownership on labor market attachment and explains why mothers and fathers respond to it in different ways. [less ▲]

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See detailDelayed and Depressed: From Expensive Housing to Smaller Families
Flynn, Lindsay UL

in International Journal of Housing Policy (2017), 17(3), 374-395

Individuals face challenges in acquiring suitable housing at multiple stages of their life. Many stages – leaving the parental home, partnering, having children – have historically clustered in the 20s ... [more ▼]

Individuals face challenges in acquiring suitable housing at multiple stages of their life. Many stages – leaving the parental home, partnering, having children – have historically clustered in the 20s and early 30s. Increasingly, these stages extend into the late 30s and early 40s. This paper proposes a new framework to assess the role of housing in shaping the physical and financial space individuals have to meet their family goals. It identifies two links, one indirect and one direct, between housing and family size. Indirectly, later exits from the parental home correspond to delays in family formation and smaller families. Directly, housing costs compete with spending on children prompting tradeoffs and smaller families. The two links are supported utilising cross-national microdata from 18 countries in Europe and North America during the mid-2000s with an additional analysis of four focus countries: Austria, Germany, France, and Italy. This paper adds to a growing body of literature emphasising the importance of housing, family formation, and family size. It also emphasises a need to reframe the focus of the literature from housing tenure and the second half of the adult life course to housing costs and the first half of the adult life course. [less ▲]

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See detailChildcare Markets and Maternal Employment: A Typology
Flynn, Lindsay UL

in Journal of European Social Policy (2017), 27(3), 260-275

How does the structure of a country’s childcare market influence maternal employment? Childcare markets vary across countries, leading mothers to rely on various forms of care depending on what is ... [more ▼]

How does the structure of a country’s childcare market influence maternal employment? Childcare markets vary across countries, leading mothers to rely on various forms of care depending on what is available to them in both the public (state-provided) and private (non-state) childcare markets. Maternal employment is higher in countries that combine comprehensive childcare policies with an available and affordable private care market. When aspects of either the public or private market are lacking, the employment of mothers, and especially mothers with young children, is lower. This article proposes a fourfold classification scheme based on the type of ‘penalty’ that women experience in the labour market as mothers. It then links each penalty to distinct policy structures of childcare markets and shows that the four penalties are visible at both the country and individual level. By articulating how public and private care markets work in concert to shape maternal employment, this article adds to a literature that to date has focused primarily on the role of public childcare in reconciling work and family. [less ▲]

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See detailNo Exit: Social Reproduction in an Era of Rising Inequality
Flynn, Lindsay UL; Schwartz, Herman Mark

in Politics and Society (2017), 45(4), 471-503

What explains the unexpected, uneven, but unquestionably pervasive trend toward re-familialization in the rich OECD countries? The usual arguments about political responses to rising income inequality ... [more ▼]

What explains the unexpected, uneven, but unquestionably pervasive trend toward re-familialization in the rich OECD countries? The usual arguments about political responses to rising income inequality, unstable families, and unstable employment predicted that the state would increasingly shelter people against risk, producing greater individuation and de- rather than re-familialization. By contrast, we argue three things. First, re-familialization has replaced de-familialization. Second, unequal access to housing drives a large part of re-familialization. Rather than becoming more “Anglo-Nordic,” countries are becoming more “southern European” in the way that younger cohorts access housing. Third, this inequality-driven insecurity and unequal access is felt differently not only between generational cohorts but also within cohorts. [less ▲]

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See detailCan Unequal Distributions of Wealth Influence Vote Choice? A Comparative Study of Germany, Sweden and the United States
Flynn, Lindsay UL; Paradowski, Piotr

in Jesuit, David K.; Williams, Russell Alan (Eds.) Public Policy, Governance and Polarization: Making Governance Work (2017)

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