References of "Fechtner, Julia"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailInfluence of acute stress on response inhibition in healthy men: An ERP study
Dierolf, Angelika UL; Fechtner, Julia; Böhnke, Robina et al

in Psychophysiology (2017), 54(5), 684-695

The current study investigated the influence of acute stress and the resulting cortisol increase on response inhibition and its underlying cortical processes, using EEG. Before and after an acute stressor ... [more ▼]

The current study investigated the influence of acute stress and the resulting cortisol increase on response inhibition and its underlying cortical processes, using EEG. Before and after an acute stressor or a control condition, 39 healthy men performed a go/no-go task while ERPs (N2, P3), reaction times, errors, and salivary cortisol were measured. Acute stress impaired neither accuracy nor reaction times, but differentially affected the neural correlates of response inhibition; namely, stress led to enhanced amplitudes of the N2 difference waves (N2d, no-go minus go), indicating enhanced response inhibition and conflict monitoring. Moreover, participants responding to the stressor with an acute substantial rise in cortisol (high cortisol responders) showed reduced amplitudes of the P3 of the difference waves (P3d, no-go minus go) after the stressor, indicating an impaired evaluation and finalization of the inhibitory process. Our findings indicate that stress leads to a reallocation of cognitive resources to the neural subprocesses of inhibitory control, strengthening premotor response inhibition and the detection of response conflict, while concurrently diminishing the subsequent finalization process within the stream of processing. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 133 (3 UL)
See detailNeuronale Korrelate der Verarbeitung emotionaler Bilder
Dierolf, Angelika UL; Fechtner, Julia; Naumann, Ewald

Scientific Conference (2014, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 10 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailEnhanced emotional regulation after provocation through stress- the influence of acute stress and provocation on affective picture processing: an event-related potential study
Dierolf, Angelika UL; Fechtner, Julia; Rapoport, Olja et al

Poster (2014)

The stress hormone cortisol has been identified as an important factor promoting aggression. Taken by itself, cortisol and aggression have been shown to alter the processing of social relevant information ... [more ▼]

The stress hormone cortisol has been identified as an important factor promoting aggression. Taken by itself, cortisol and aggression have been shown to alter the processing of social relevant information, the latter being crucial in the development of a vicious cycle of violence. However, the mutual influence of cortisol and aggression on information processing has hardly been examined, even though this might provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of the escalation and the persistence of aggressive behavior, once it has begun. Thus, the present study investigated the effect of stress-induced rise in cortisol and provoked aggression on affective picture processing. 71 subjects were randomly assigned to a stress or a control condition and were either highly or mildly provoked during the subsequent Taylor Aggression Paradigm. Next, 144 pictures with positive, negative or aggressive content were presented. Meanwhile the EEG was recorded and acute levels of salivary cortisol were collected. Results revealed that cortisol and provocation jointly altered especially later event-related components (P300, slow waves), albeit in opposite direction. While high provocation resulted in overall enhanced amplitudes in the control group, it led to reduced amplitudes to all affective pictures in subjects with stress-induced increase of cortisol levels, indicating a general emotional regulation. These results suggest that adaptive controlling mechanisms are activated to face the mutual impact of stress and provocation, underlining the impact of cortisol in the context of aggression. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailAkuter Stress führt zu einer veränderten Verarbeitung von provozierenden Stimuli im Taylor-Aggressions-Paradigma – eine EKP Studie
Dierolf, Angelika UL; Fechtner, Julia; Naumann, Ewald

Poster (2013)

Befunde aus tier- und humanexperimentelle Studien zeigen, dass Stress ein wesentlicher Faktor in der Ausl ̈osung und Aufrechterhal- tung von aggressivem Verhalten ist. So beeinflusst Stress und Cor- tisol ... [more ▼]

Befunde aus tier- und humanexperimentelle Studien zeigen, dass Stress ein wesentlicher Faktor in der Ausl ̈osung und Aufrechterhal- tung von aggressivem Verhalten ist. So beeinflusst Stress und Cor- tisol unter anderem die Verarbeitung von bedrohlichen Stimuli, wie z.B. w ̈utenden Gesichtern. Der Einfluss von Stress und Cortisol auf die Verarbeitung aggressionsausl ̈osender Stimuli w ̈ahrend eines ag- gressiven Encounters wurde bisher noch nicht erforscht. Um dies zu untersuchen, durchliefen in der vorliegenden Studie 71 gesunde Pro- banden (36 m, 35 w) zun ̈achst eine Stressprozedur (sozial evalua- tive Kaltwasser Stresstest) bzw. ein Warmwasser-Kontrollprozedur. Anschließend wurde die H ̈alfte jeder Gruppe im Taylor Aggressions- Paradigma provoziert. W ̈ahrend des Experiments wurde das EEG aufgezeichnet und mehrere Speichelproben zur Cortisolanalyse ge- nommen, auf deren Grundlage Probanden der Kaltwassergruppe in Cortisol-Responder und –Nonresponder unterteilt wurden. Die Aus- wertung von Ereigniskorrelierten Potentialen (EKPs) bez ̈uglich des provozierenden Stimulus ergab, dass provozierte Probanden eine po- sitivere frontozentrale P3 zeigten als nicht provozierte. W ̈ahrend stressinduzierter Cortisolanstieg diesen Effekt bei Frauen verst ̈arkte, zeigten provozierte m ̈annliche Cortisol-Responder reduzierte P3 Am- plituden. Diese Befunde zeigen eine neurophysiologische Assoziation zwischen Stress und Aggression bezüglich der Verarbeitung von ag- gressionsausl ̈osenden Signalen, was wesentlich für die Eskalation von aggressivem Verhalten sein könnte. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailStress and Aggression – The influence of stress on processing of provoking stimuli during a retaliation paradigm- an ERP study
Dierolf, Angelika UL; Fechtner, Julia; Naumann, Ewald

Scientific Conference (2012, July)

Many studies suggest a vicious circle between stress and aggression. But its physiological basis is not fully understood. Trait aggression and externalizing behavior are characterized by reduced P3 waves ... [more ▼]

Many studies suggest a vicious circle between stress and aggression. But its physiological basis is not fully understood. Trait aggression and externalizing behavior are characterized by reduced P3 waves in Event Related Potentials (ERP). Stress affects the processing of aggression related stimuli. Moreover, the stress hormone cortisol enhances the attention to social threat and the propensity for aggression. The aim of the present study was to asses the effect of acute stress and the concomitant cortisol release on the processing of provoking stimuli during an aggressive encounter using the Taylor Aggression Paradigm (TAP). 71 healthy participants (36 men) were subjected to the socially evaluated cold pressor test as an experimental stressor or to a warm pressor test (control condition). Half of each group received high or low levels of provocation in the TAP. Throughout the experiment EEG was recorded, and salivary cortisol was collected. Stressed participants were divided into cortisol-responders and –non responders. Event-related potentials during provoking stimuli revealed that highly provoked participants had a more positive P3 amplitude (fronto-central) compared to hardly provoked participants, replicating previous findings. Increased cortisol combined with provocation led to a reduced P3 amplitude and reduced late positive potentials in cortisol-responders. The results suggest that an interaction between stressor-induced cortisol and provocation affects the processing of conflict signals and contributes to a vicious cycle between stress and aggression. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEinfluss von akutem Stress & Provokation auf die Verarbeitung emotionaler Bilder
Dierolf, Angelika UL; Fechtner, Julia; Naumann, Ewald

in Miltner, Wolfgang; Weiss, Thomas (Eds.) Prorgammheft und Abstractband der PuG 2012 (2012, June)

Research has shown that the stress hormone cortisol is important for the regulation of social motivational processes. Besides, aggression is a common behavior which is frequently involved in changes in ... [more ▼]

Research has shown that the stress hormone cortisol is important for the regulation of social motivational processes. Besides, aggression is a common behavior which is frequently involved in changes in higher level information processing patterns. However, the influence of the interaction between both on information processing has been hardly examined, even though there is some evidence that cortisol plays a crucial role in the attention to social threat and release of aggressive behavior. Thus, the aim of the present study was to access the effect of acute stress, the thereby caused cortisol release and provocation on affective picture processing. 71 healthy subjects were subjected to the socially evaluated cold pressor test or warm pressor test (control condition). Half of each group received high or low levels of provocation during the Taylor Aggression Paradigm. Afterwards, 144 emotional pictures with positive, negative or aggressive content were presented. Throughout the experiment EEG was recorded and acute levels of salivary cortisol were collected. Established effects within the event-related potentials depending on the presented emotion could be replicated. Moreover, preliminary results indicate that event-related earlier (N2, P2), as well as later components (P3, slow waves) are complexly influenced by endogenous cortisol and provocation, suggesting an effect on various stages of socially relevant information processing of stimuli. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)