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See detailBiogas – Power – Space. On the Construction of Energy Regions in Border Area.
Faller, Fabian UL

in Wille, Christian; Reckinger, Rachel; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) et al Spaces and Identities in Border Regions. Politics – Media – Subjects. (2016)

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See detailPolicies and Normalizations.
Amann, Wilhelm UL; Faller, Fabian UL; Heimböckel, Dieter UL et al

in Wille, Christian; Reckinger, Rachel; Kmec, Sonja (Eds.) et al Spaces and Identities in Border Regions. Politics – Media – Subjects. (2016)

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See detailEnergetisches Regionalisieren. Transformationspraktiken der Energiewende am Beispiel der Biogaserzeugung
Faller, Fabian UL

Doctoral thesis (2015)

This doctoral dissertation examines geographical dimensions of the energy transition. It develops a conceptual framework for practice oriented transition studies in economic geography. Therefore, the ... [more ▼]

This doctoral dissertation examines geographical dimensions of the energy transition. It develops a conceptual framework for practice oriented transition studies in economic geography. Therefore, the energy transition is conceptualised as a socio-technical phenomenon and as a result of various practices. These practices (re)produce and transform the spatial contexts in which energy is produced and consumed. The main focus lies on the shift to renewable energies in so-called “energy regions”. There, various actors are involved in the operation of renewable energy facilities, such as operators, plant manufacturers, maintenance companies, planners, politicians, or local residents. The dissertation in hand illuminates the space-time dimension of these actors’ interplay, how their practices change over time and thereby constitute energy regions. The case of biogas co-fermentation exemplifies this “energetic regionalising”. Central findings are first, that knowledge exchange and creation of routines are central for regionalisations in the biogas sector. Second, in the case of renewable energies, different spatial concepts unfold meaning: Euclidian space as locale of resources, technologies and social discourse; relational space as platform for knowledge exchange as well as the creation and diffusion of routines, values and norms – that are embodied in practices of regionalisation. And third, regionalisations can be understood as practices and processes that contribute to the creation and stabilisation economic sectors. [less ▲]

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See detailEnergetic Regionalising (original titel: Energy is spacy with a chance of region)
Faller, Fabian UL

Presentation (2014, August 28)

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See detailZur Konstruktion von Energieregionen in Grenzräumen.
Faller, Fabian UL

Scientific Conference (2014, July 07)

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See detailBiogas – Macht – Raum. Zur Konstruktion von Energieregionen in Grenzräumen
Faller, Fabian UL

in Hesse, Markus; Kmec, Sonja; Reckinger, Rachel (Eds.) et al Räume und Identitäten in Grenzregionen. Politiken – Medien – Subjekte (2014)

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See detailPolitiken und Normierungen.
Faller, Fabian UL; Amann, Wilhelm UL; Heimböckel, Dieter UL et al

in Hesse, Markus; Kmec, Sonja; Reckinger, Rachel (Eds.) et al Räume und Identitäten in Grenzregionen. Politiken – Medien – Subjekte (2014)

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See detailRegional Strategies for Renewable Energies: Development Processes in Greater Manchester
Faller, Fabian UL

in European Planning Studies (2014), 22(5), 889908

Making the transition to renewable, low-carbon forms of energy could be the defining question of our times. Especially for complex problems such as energy supply the regional scale and new forms of ... [more ▼]

Making the transition to renewable, low-carbon forms of energy could be the defining question of our times. Especially for complex problems such as energy supply the regional scale and new forms of control, coordination and cooperation—subsumed under the term regional governance—are widely discussed both in politics (e.g. G8 conferences, Climate Summits, etc.) and academia. The turn from conventional to renewable energies is one major topic of discussion. For this process of change, regional governance can be seen as the best way to initiate it. With the help of a case study conducted in Greater Manchester, UK, this article concentrates on two points: (1) the development of regional governance arrangements in the light of a low-carbon agenda as mixture of path-dependent bottom-up and top-down approaches and (2) the impacts of specific constellations and environments for regional energy development that include institutional rules, strategic behaviour of actors and strategic discourses. This article shows that the integration of a regional governance structure into the strategic development process can achieve a substantial qualitative improvement for the development of a regional energy strategy. [less ▲]

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See detailGas und Geld – Finanzierungspraktiken der Biogaserzeugung
Faller, Fabian UL

Presentation (2014, February 22)

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See detailFinanzierung der Energiewende durch die Europäische Investitionsbank
Faller, Fabian UL

Presentation (2014, February 22)

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See detailRaumverhältnisse der Biogaserzeugung
Faller, Fabian UL

Presentation (2014, February 19)

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See detailÖkonomische mikro-Praktiken der Energiewende
Faller, Fabian UL

Scientific Conference (2013, December 07)

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See detailNachhaltige Regionalentwicklung durch energetische Regionalisierung
Faller, Fabian UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2013)

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See detailLocal transition paths to sustainability. How a biogas plant transformed local policy: the case of Beckerich/Luxembourg
Faller, Fabian UL

Scientific Conference (2013, October 10)

Renewable energies are increasingly perceived as important subjects for local development: employment effects, substitution of energy imports, creation of networks that can encourage the further ... [more ▼]

Renewable energies are increasingly perceived as important subjects for local development: employment effects, substitution of energy imports, creation of networks that can encourage the further development of social capital, just to name a few. Related to these potentials are questions of the energy transformations’ governance and spaces, such as: which local policies are developed; which economic activities evolve locally; which conditions at various scales (local, sub-national, national, supra-national) frame the aforementioned aspects; which actors are key to take the transition path? The core interests of the paper are threefold: First, to provide a conceptual framework for thinking socio-technical transitions as local to regional phenomena grounded in practices of transitions and their management; I call these practices “energetic regionalisations”: processes of constitution and reproduction of energy regions, and how practices and policies of such “energetic regionalisations“ intertwine. Second, to develop a methodology or analysis tool for examining transition pathways, based on the so-called Capacity to Act Matrix (cf. Hammer 2008), enriched with a governance perspective on actors’ constellations; here, my focus lies on actors’ constellations, their overall visions, their strategies, powers, and the kind of tools they can use to change or to conserve the current regime–as defined, for instance, by Geels (2002). Third, to illustrate, with the help of a case study from Beckerich in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, how the energy transition can support the local transition to a sustainability agenda (beginning in the late 1970s). I examine institutional and structural conditions that framed processes of transitions towards renewable energy policies, and how these related to socio-technical developments. Furthermore, practices of actors involved into the transition process get core of the analysis. Consequently, important elements are: • Energy related activities at the local and regional scale as seed-bed of transitions; • The national and supra-national energy regime and frameworks for energy development, such as the Covenant of Mayors, the Climate Alliance, the Kyoto protocol, the Renewable Energy Roadmap for Luxembourg, or the EU 2020 strategy; • The actual timeline of the transition path in the case of Beckerich, subdivided into four phases (cf. Loorbach 2006): the predevelopment phase, characterized by the rural migration context, by the oil crisis and by the environmental movement growth. The take-off phase, where new ideas relating to the energy transition start to become mainstream. The breakthrough phase, when sustainable development is the guiding principle. Finally, the stabilisation phase and the emergence of a new dynamic equilibrium, in which the achieved transition is, on the one hand, sustained in terms of thinking and acting, and on the other hand, improvements are added to further enhance the economic, social and environmental situation of the commune; • The main actors of transition processes (the mayor, two NGOs, some farmers, consultants and their feasibility studies, the Government of Luxembourg, and the European Union) and their relations, based on their type of policy levers (rulemaking, regulatory oversight, direct expenditures/procurement, financial incentives, information gathering and dissemination, convening/facilitation and advocacy), as well as their modes of cooperation. The paper concludes with six key findings. First, municipalities can be essential for boosting the energy transition. Second, a long breath is needed, because the transformation proves to be sustainably effective if it is taking several years. Third, intelligent and solid networking is essential to acquire profound knowledge on energy production. Fourth, transition paths do not necessarily emerge bottom up. Fifth, from the transition process various institutionalised groups can emerge (NGOs) that can become important lobby groups in the long run. Sixth, the wider political landscape is a very important element to enhance or to block the energy transition. To summarise these main insights: the local government can play an essential role, but a successful outcome will also heavily depend on the abilities of local stakeholders as well as on external events. Therefore, the capacity to change and to adapt to new roles throughout the transition path is essential. [less ▲]

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See detailEveryday Economic Practices as Processes of Regionalisations
Faller, Fabian UL

Scientific Conference (2013, April 12)

For rural areas the utilisation of renewable energies can support a prosperous development. Economic practices are increasingly important for understanding changes in this sector. The interplay of ... [more ▼]

For rural areas the utilisation of renewable energies can support a prosperous development. Economic practices are increasingly important for understanding changes in this sector. The interplay of economic practices with corporate and governmental policies is related to questions of space and scale, such as: which everyday economic practices form energy markets changes; which conditions frame regional policies and practices; which processes of regionalisations evolve? The core interests of the paper are to analyse processes of constitution and reproduction of different types of energy regions and markets, and how practices and policies of such “energetic regionalisations“ intertwine – applying a multi-theory and multi-method (Interviews, Document Analysis) approach, focussing on biogas production in Luxembourg and Germany. I examine institutional and structural conditions that frame processes of regionalisations in the biogas economy and how these relate to socio-technical developments – based on evolutionary institutionalism and socio-technical transition studies. Important elements are: (1) The dynamic dimension of frameworks; (2) the concurrence of political, social, economic and technical processes; (3) the spatial differences of energy related policies. Economic practices in the biogas economy (e.g. by operators, investors) are another part of investigation - following the theory of Everyday Regionalisations. The important elements here are: (1) The constitution and reproduction of regions through economic practices; and (2) the threefold relationship between economic practices and governmental energy policies as: (a) policies supporting or restricting practices; (b) practices producing and restructuring policies – and regional markets; and (c) policies as environmental drivers for practices – and vice versa. The paper focuses on the conceptual framework of an ongoing research project. Preliminary results from the field study will be presented. [less ▲]

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See detailRegionalisations as Multi-Level Phenomena
Faller, Fabian UL

Presentation (2013, January 28)

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See detailSustainable Regional Development through Energetic Regionlaisations
Faller, Fabian UL

Presentation (2012, November 20)

The goal of my research project is to analyse processes of (re)productions of regions within the biogas sector and illustrate different development paths. The case study is located in the border area of ... [more ▼]

The goal of my research project is to analyse processes of (re)productions of regions within the biogas sector and illustrate different development paths. The case study is located in the border area of Luxembourg and Germany. The application of renewable energies in decentralised ways is considered being the ultimate chance for a long lasting prosperous and environmentally sound regional development, since they trigger various positive effects (e. g. regional value added, less power loss, lower susceptibility to discrepancies, substitution of energy imports, job creation etc.). To effectively and efficiently implement decentralised renewables, such as bioenergy, photovoltaics or wind power, the interaction and collaboration of various regional and sub-/supra-regional actors is necessary. They all – at least slightly - differ in their perspectives on challenges for energy supply as well as on the region itself. Hence, questions of space and scale arise: If the transition to renewable energies can be achieved by a decentralised utilisation, where does this take place, what is the region for implementing them? Or vice versa – my core research question: Which processes of regionalisations are initiated through the utilisation of renewable energies, especially biogas production? To address this question, I apply a multi-theory and multi-method approach. In theoretic terms, I put on two “glasses”. On the one hand, I analyse institutional and structural conditions that frame processes of regionalisations in the biogas economy and how these conditions relate to socio-technical developments. My theoretical approach is based on evolutionary institutionalism and socio-technical transition studies. Therefor, industrial networks and strategic games, techno-scientific knowledge, cultural and symbolic meanings, sectorial policies, as well as markets and user practices are important elements of analysis. It is important to be aware of the dynamic dimension of frameworks (development and change / evolution), the concurrence of political, social, economic and technical processes, the long lasting transformations, and the spatial differences (context) (cf. Boschma/Frenken, 2006; Glückler, 2007; Hayter, 2004; Jones/Murphy, 2010; Truffer, 2008) – that are typical not only for decentralised technologies. My focuses of investigation from this perspective are threefold. First, I explore the legal framework, contractual agreements and association/group structures that relate to biogas production. Second, I study the political, social, and economic developments in the biogas sector and their effects on technological developments. And third, I analyse the alignments of institutional structures and individual decision making with new biogas technologies. I apply a retrospective perspective, looking back at the period from the mid-1990s (liberalisation of EU energy market, upcoming of bioenergy) till today. On the other hand, I shift the focus to economic practices and everyday actions of actors in the biogas economy (e.g. operators, investors). The main goals are to analyse the economic utilisation of spatial categories and contexts, and to uncover the relationship of economy, action and spatial references. In which ways do everyday actions constitute, reproduce and transform scale and space metaphors („regions“)? Which action responses do they trigger? Which external regionalisations influence the actors’ decisions – regionalisations “done” by non-economic actors (e.g. planners, politicians, NGOs, media)? How do biogas producers perceive external regionalisations? I focus on processes of constitution and reproduction of different types of energy regions and the modes and patterns, in which practices influence the processes of regionalisations – following Benno Werlen’s theory of everyday regionalisations (Werlen, 1999; 2007; 2010). In terms of methodology I am currently using two different concepts. Since I apply, on the one hand, an action oriented approach to regionalisations, I conduct interviews with actors in the biogas economy to investigate elements such as perceptions, performances, patterns, power relations, or intensions. I will set these elements in the context of scale and space metaphors: doings and sayings with spatial references or connotations – whether explicit or implicit. On the other hand I apply document analysis for extracting different “regions” that are expressed, for example, in strategy papers, business reports, official statements, laws, directives, planning documents, or media coverage. I will, in another step, confront experts with the findings from the second data source to examine, how they – if at all – perceive them and how they incorporate them into their practices. The findings and theoretical thoughts shall lead to a better understanding of processes of regionalisations and different concepts or connotations of the region, for theoretical purposes as well as to inform policy making. Furthermore, I aim at enriching or even opening the floor for two discussions. At the one hand, how theories of economic practice might enrich evolutionary approaches to understand economic processes. At the other hand – and in the context of a energy / bioenergy debate – how a new perspective on the relations between economy and environment can help us to conceptualise an Environmental Economic Geography that takes Economic/Corporate Greening, Environmental Governance, Facets of North-South-Relations and other Greening Contexts serious. [less ▲]

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