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See detailDesigning and managing an online, personalised research writing course for postgraduates
Deroey, Katrien UL; Skipp, Jennifer

in Mcdiarmid, Carole (Ed.) Exploring pedagogical approaches in EAP teaching (in press)

This paper describes and evaluates a multidisciplinary, online research writing course for PhD students. First, we explain our course rationale and set-up. The core principles are personalised, self ... [more ▼]

This paper describes and evaluates a multidisciplinary, online research writing course for PhD students. First, we explain our course rationale and set-up. The core principles are personalised, self-regulated and peer learning, and the optimal use of class time. This is achieved through the following components: an e-coursebook developed in-house; tasks preparing students for the workshops; workshops; writing and reflection; peer review; and individual consultations. Next, we review participants’ feedback from course evaluation surveys. Many students liked the online format although most would prefer the peer review and discussion of theory to happen ‘offline’. A key finding for course efficacy is that students greatly valued working with their own examples in the workshops. They saw this and independent learning tasks as the greatest drivers of their writing development. They also benefited from multidisciplinary peer review. As regards the writing and reflection, all students chose to write on their own and the writing reflection tool was deemed ineffective. We furthermore discuss our (teachers’) perceptions of the affordances and challenges of this course format. On the one hand, it allows workshops to be devoted to collaborative tasks, reflection and data-driven learning. On the other hand, preparing such workshops is very time-consuming, while the multiple components and regular task submissions carry a heavy administrative burden. The paper concludes with how lessons learnt have been implemented into the current course configuration. [less ▲]

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See detailLecture discourse and lecturer training
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Journal of English for Academic Purposes (in press)

This special issue brings together research on lecture discourse and lecturer training that contributes to the design and delivery of EAP lecture listening and note-taking courses on the one hand and ... [more ▼]

This special issue brings together research on lecture discourse and lecturer training that contributes to the design and delivery of EAP lecture listening and note-taking courses on the one hand and lecturer training (for English Medium Instruction) on the other. The internationalization of higher education has gone hand in hand with a continuing increase in English Medium Instruction (EMI) - the use of English as a language of instruction in countries where it is not an official language – as well as online lectures. This has led to lecturing contexts which are linguistically, communicatively, educationally and culturally complex. To support students and lecturers in respectively learning and teaching effectively in this multifaceted context, proposals are invited for articles that provide insights into issues with a clear relevance to EAP course provision, such as the following: • What are the linguistic, communicative or multimodal features of lectures (face-to-face or online)? • How does English L1 and non-L1 (EMI) lecture discourse differ? • How can EAP practitioners prepare students for lectures delivered by EMI lecturers? • How can we assess the linguistic, communicative and pedagogical skills needed for effective lecture comprehension or lecturing? • How can we support or train EMI lecturers to teach effectively in English? • How can we support or train EMI and L1 English lecturers to teach groups with heterogeneous English language skills as well as different language, educational and cultural backgrounds? [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning and delivering an online research article writing course for doctoral students in Luxembourg during Covid-19
Deroey, Katrien UL; Skipp, Jennifer

in Fenton, James; Gimenez, Julio; Mansfield, Katherine (Eds.) et al International perspectives on teaching academic English in turbulent times (2023)

This chapter reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an online research article writing course for doctoral students. The course format was a response to COVID-19 but was designed to be ... [more ▼]

This chapter reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an online research article writing course for doctoral students. The course format was a response to COVID-19 but was designed to be sustainable through enabling flexible, interactive, personalised and independent learning. Its five major components are independent learning tasks, online workshops, writing output, peer review and consultations. Moodle is used for resources and assignments; WebEx for workshops and consultations. Students independently use the e-coursebook to read the theory and submit tasks based on their own texts and articles in their discipline ahead of a workshop on the topic. Additionally, they periodically submit article drafts and engage in peer review. Consultations with the instructor further personalise learning. Having described the course, the chapter goes on to evaluate its affordances and issues by reporting student feedback and teachers’ experiences. It was found that students greatly appreciated the systematic work on their writing in tasks and workshops. However, workshop preparation was very time-consuming for teachers and students would prefer them to be ‘offline’. Furthermore, multidisciplinary peer reviewing and the need to write throughout the course were positively perceived, although requiring greater flexibility in submission times. Consultations were also rated as extremely useful. We conclude with recommendations regarding online course delivery and a blended adaptation for post-COVID purposes. [less ▲]

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See detailA comprehensive survey of English medium instruction lecturer training programmes: content, delivery, ways forward
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Journal of English for Academic Purposes (2023)

This paper surveys English medium instruction (EMI) lecturer training worldwide in order to inform decisions by practitioners tasked with its design and delivery. The survey encompasses 25 published ... [more ▼]

This paper surveys English medium instruction (EMI) lecturer training worldwide in order to inform decisions by practitioners tasked with its design and delivery. The survey encompasses 25 published initiatives from 18 countries. These were analysed for their content components and delivery methods as well as training challenges and recommendations. This analysis revealed four main components: language, communication, pedagogy and EMI awareness. Most programmes were delivered face to face but some were blended with a substantial amount of online and independent work. Delivery methods could broadly be classified into group classes, individual support and peer learning. Microteaching with reflection, feedback and observation was a widely recurring and highly rated activity. Programmes were typically developed in-house by English language professionals. Recurring challenges were contextualisation, group heterogeneity, lecturer confidence and the lack of incentivisation. The paper concludes with pedagogical recommendations for the development of EMI lecturer training programmes. [less ▲]

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See detailA survey of EMI lecturer training programmes: content, delivery, ways forward.
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2022, June 09)

This talk will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training by surveying published initiatives worldwide (Deroey, 2021). Although EMI is not a recent ... [more ▼]

This talk will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training by surveying published initiatives worldwide (Deroey, 2021). Although EMI is not a recent phenomenon, many higher education institutions are only now beginning to organize specific support for EMI lecturers. EAP practitioners are often tasked with providing such support, since the perception commonly is that language is the main issue requiring improvement. However, the efficient design and delivery of EMI lecturing training and support is a complex challenge. First, most literature highlights the need for pedagogical and communication training in addition to language work. Second the varied EMI context means training should be adapted to the local cultural, educational, linguistic and institutional contexts (Herington, 2020; Martinez & Fernandes, 2020; Tuomainen, 2018). Third, we need to be sensitive to lecturers’ attitudes towards EMI and EMI training (Tsui, 2018). Fourth, there are practical considerations such as the timely provision of support (Guarda & Helm, 2017); promoting participation; facilitating learning transfer to lectures; and working with what are usually heterogeneous participant groups in terms of English proficiency, (EMI) lecturing experience and discipline (Ball & Lindsay, 2013). Finally, the design of these programmes typically needs to happen with very limited institutional resources, few (if any) published materials and relatively little published research on lecture discourse and EMI lecturer training. Having surveyed the main components, formats and work forms of the programmes, the conclusion highlights ways forward in EMI lecturer training that emerge from this analysis. References Ball, P., & Lindsay, D. (2013). Language demands and support for English-medium instruction in tertiary education. Learning from a specific context In A. Doiz, D. Lasagabaster, & J. M. Sierra (Eds.), English-medium instruction at universities: Global challenges (pp. 44-61). Multilingual Matters. Deroey, K. L. B. (2021). Lecturer training for English Medium Instruction: what and how? In B. D. Bond, A. & M. Evans (Ed.), Innovation, exploration and transformation. Proceedings of the 2019 BALEAP Conference (pp. 245-253). Garnet. Guarda, M., & Helm, F. (2017). A survey of lecturers’ needs and feedback on EMI training. In K. Ackerley, M. Guarda, & F. Helm (Eds.), Sharing perspectives on English-medium instruction (pp. 167-194). Peter Lang. Herington, R. (2020). Observation as a tool to facilitate the professional development of teaching faculty involved in English as a Medium of Instruction: trainer and trainee perspectives. In M. L. Carrió-Pasto (Ed.), Internationalising Learning in Higher Education (pp. 65-82). IGI Global. Martinez, R., & Fernandes, K. (2020). Development of a teacher training course for English medium instruction for higher education professors in Brazil. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher Training for English-Medium Instruction in Higher Education (pp. 125-152). IGI Global. Tuomainen, S. (2018). Supporting non-native university lecturers with English-medium instruction. Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, 10(3), 230-242. [less ▲]

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See detailMetadiscourse by native and non-native English speakers: importance marking in lectures
Deroey, Katrien UL; Johnson, Jane Helen

Scientific Conference (2021, May 27)

This talk has a dual purpose. In addition to mapping the use of one type of metadiscourse, viz. importance markers, across ‘native’ and ‘English Medium Instruction’ (EMI) lecture corpora, we elaborate on ... [more ▼]

This talk has a dual purpose. In addition to mapping the use of one type of metadiscourse, viz. importance markers, across ‘native’ and ‘English Medium Instruction’ (EMI) lecture corpora, we elaborate on analytical issues related to studying metadiscourse in spoken and disciplinary discourse. ‘Importance markers’ (Deroey & Taverniers, 2012) are lexicogrammatical metadiscursive devices combining discourse organization with evaluation along a ‘parameter of importance or relevance’ (Thompson and Hunston, 2000, p. 24). In lectures, they help students identify key content, which is useful for allocating processing resources while listening to what are typically dense monologues that require processing in real time. This in turns is likely to benefit understanding, note-taking and retention. Comparing the use of importance markers in a single-discipline corpus of engineering lectures by ‘native’ speakers and EMI lecturers, our aim was to contribute to the limited insights into the linguistic features of EMI lecture discourse generally and metadiscourse important for lecture discourse organization and hence lecture listening, specifically. Both researchers independently identified potential importance markers manually in lectures 46 engineering lectures (364,542 words) delivered in the Italy, Malaysia, the UK, and New Zealand,. Agreed instances were tagged and the tagged corpus imported into Sketch Engine to facilitate further analysis. Overall, native speakers and EMI lecturers differed little in importance marker frequency, range, types, and lexemes. In both corpora, the predominant verb marker was V n/clause (e.g. remember they don't know each other). The main difference was the far more common use of the listener-oriented 2 pers pron V n/clause marker (you must understand how to apply this one) by the non-native speakers but this was largely due to idiolectic variation. Contrary to most corpus linguistic metadiscourse studies, we report the inevitable analytical difficulties when identifying and classifying metadiscourse. Issues include establishing a definition that is broad enough to capture the various realizations of a metadiscursive function, while not ‘opening the floodgates’ to include instances that are not representative or that render the study unfeasible. For us this included distinguishing between evaluation of discourse and ‘real world’ entities, excluding very frequent phrases that could be viewed as importance markers but in this discipline probably served another function, and establishing a continuum of highlighting ‘force’. These considerations necessitated careful manual analysis of a relatively small corpus, which however means that generalization are limited and idiolectic bias more likely. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning and managing an online, personalised research writing course for postgraduates
Deroey, Katrien UL; Skipp, Jennifer

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

This paper describes and evaluates an online research article writing course at the University of Luxembourg. Participants were self-referred PhD students from different disciplines. The aim of the ten ... [more ▼]

This paper describes and evaluates an online research article writing course at the University of Luxembourg. Participants were self-referred PhD students from different disciplines. The aim of the ten-week course is to improve insight into the structural, stylistic and rhetorical features of research articles as well as the writing and publication process. It also provides tools for students to develop their own writing. We will situate our course rationale and design within the literature, then compare these to both the reality of managing and delivering the course online as well as participants’ feedback as reflected in 30 surveys. We will focus on the following results: • The practicability of including multiple pedagogical elements in an online course was challenging. We wanted to integrate both independent and collaborative work, production and reflection. However, results of the surveys and our own experience show that the multiplicity of elements was often seen as complex and difficult to manage and multiple submission deadlines problematic. • Students favoured working alone over working together and uptake of writing groups (Aitchison, 2009) was poor. Multi-disciplinary peer groups were, however, positively reviewed (cf. Hyland, 2012). • The flexibility of the online environment was seen as positive, yet many reported problems finding time to write. However, participants did see the benefit in having to write regularly. Tools of reflection did not score highly. • The personalisation of learning input scored highly in the survey, but this was time-consuming to implement. Whilst instructor-student consultations were offered to further personalise feedback, these had a low uptake (8/30). • We wanted to create a course which included guidance on the writing and publication process (Starfield & Paltridge, 2016) as well as increased genre awareness (Swales, 1990) to prepare students for publication. However, tasks on language and structure were rated more useful by more students than this content. • More participants commented on the benefit of working through their language issues in live sessions over learning how to address language issues through the corpus-tools that were integrated into the course (Charles, 2018). Through sharing this information, we hope to generate a discussion with the audience about ways to optimise online writing courses and manage some of the problems associated with online delivery. Aitchison, C. (2009). Writing groups for doctoral education. Studies in Higher Education, 34(8), 905-916. Charles, M. (2018) Corpus-assisted editing for doctoral students: More than just concordancing. Journal of English for Academic Purposes, 36, 15-26. Charles, M. (2018). Using do-it-yourself-corpora in EAP: A tailor-made resource for teachers and students. Teaching English for Specific and Academic Purposes, 6(2), 217-224. Hyland, K. (2012). Disciplinary Identities: Individuality and Community in Academic Discourse. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Nesi, H. & Gardener, S. (2012). Genres across the disciplines: Student writing in higher education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Paltridge, B., & Starfield, S. (2016). Getting published in academic journals: Navigating the publication process. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. Swales, J. (1990). Genre analysis: English in academic and research settings. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. [less ▲]

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See detailDesigning EMI lecturer training programmes: what and how
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 08)

This workshop will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training. Although universities have been slow to organize EMI lecturer support, an increasing ... [more ▼]

This workshop will provide insights into designing and delivering English Medium Instruction (EMI) lecturer training. Although universities have been slow to organize EMI lecturer support, an increasing awareness of the challenges faced by EMI lecturers and their students now appears to be boosting the demand for EMI lecturer training and support initiatives. Consequently, EAP practitioners can increasingly expect requests to design and deliver such programmes. However, the efficient design and delivery of EMI lecturing training and support is a complex challenge. First, the EMI context is very varied and initiatives should be adapted to the local cultural, educational, linguistic and institutional contexts (Herington, 2020; Martinez & Fernandes, 2020; Tuomainen, 2018). Second, most literature highlights the need for language, pedagogical and intercultural components (e.g. Fortanet Gómez, 2020). Third, we need to be sensitive to lecturers’ attitudes towards EMI and EMI training (Tsui, 2018). Fourth, there are practical considerations such as the timely provision of support (Guarda & Helm, 2017), promoting participation, facilitating learning transfer to lectures, and optimizing the support in view of what are often heterogeneous participant groups in terms of English proficiency, (EMI) lecturing experience and discipline (Ball & Lindsay, 2013). Finally, the design of these programmes typically needs to happen with very limited institutional resources, few (if any) published materials and relatively little published research on lecture discourse and EMI lecturer training. The workshop will start with an overview of published training initiatives with their reported successes and challenges (Deroey, 2021). Next, participants will work in small groups, brainstorming ideas for an EMI support programme based on a brief we have recently received at the multilingual University of Luxembourg Language Centre. Finally, these proposals will be discussed in the whole group and key ideas summarized to consolidate the insights gained. Ball, P., & Lindsay, D. (2013). Language demands and support for English-medium instruction in tertiary education. Learning from a specific context In A. Doiz, D. Lasagabaster, & J. M. Sierra (Eds.), English-medium instruction at universities: Global challenges (pp. 44-61). Bristol: Multilingual Matters. -Deroey, K. L. B. (2021). Lecturer training for English Medium Instruction: what and how? In B. D. Bond, A. & M. Evans (Ed.), Innovation, exploration and transformation. Proceedings of the 2019 BALEAP Conference. Reading: Garnet. -Fortanet Gómez, I. (2020). The dimensions of EMI in the international classroom: training teachers for the future university. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher training for English-medium instruction in higher education (pp. 1-20). Hershey: IGI Global. -Guarda, M., & Helm, F. (2017). A survey of lecturers’ needs and feedback on EMI training. In K. Ackerley, M. Guarda, & F. Helm (Eds.), Sharing perspectives on English-medium instruction (pp. 167-194). Bern: Peter Lang. -Herington, R. (2020). Observation as a tool to facilitate the professional development of teaching faculty involved in English as a Medium of Instruction: trainer and trainee perspectives. In M. L. Carrió-Pasto (Ed.), Internationalising Learning in Higher Education (pp. 65-82). Hershey: IGI Global. -Martinez, R., & Fernandes, K. (2020). Development of a teacher training course for English medium instruction for higher education professors in Brazil. In M. Del Mar Sánchez-Pérez (Ed.), Teacher Training for English-Medium Instruction in Higher Education (pp. 125-152). Hershey: IGI Global. -Tuomainen, S. (2018). Supporting non-native university lecturers with English-medium instruction. Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education. 10(3), 230-242. -Tsui, C. (2018). Teacher efficacy: a case study of faculty beliefs in an English-medium instruction teacher training program. Taiwan Journal of TESOL, 15(1), 101-128. [less ▲]

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See detailConstructing effective and efficient EAP curricula
Deroey, Katrien UL

Presentation (2021, March 04)

In this talk I will sketch the development of an EAP curriculum at the University of Luxembourg Language Centre that takes into account multilingualism, needs analysis, insights into EAP teaching and ... [more ▼]

In this talk I will sketch the development of an EAP curriculum at the University of Luxembourg Language Centre that takes into account multilingualism, needs analysis, insights into EAP teaching and materials, discussions with stakeholders, and human resources. I will argue for an EAP curriculum approach that trains a set of core skills and enables discipline-specific genre and language learning through awareness-raising activities and corpus search tools. In this view, English for Specific Academic Purposes is not the teaching of disciplinary vocabulary. Instead, teachers use their EAP expertise to ascertain disciplinary needs, compose or evaluate materials, set tasks in line with disciplinary activities, and –importantly- provide the skills and tools to continue (discipline-specific) learning beyond the course. I will draw on examples of EAP course design from my own practice as well as on findings from my published research into EAP coursebook authenticity and multilingual course design. [less ▲]

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See detailImportance marking in EMI lectures: A comparative study
Deroey, Katrien UL; Johnson, Jane Helen

Scientific Conference (2021, February 23)

In this presentation we focus on how lecturers mark important information in their lectures. Being able to identify important information is fundamental to the learning process (Benson, 1989, p. 437), and ... [more ▼]

In this presentation we focus on how lecturers mark important information in their lectures. Being able to identify important information is fundamental to the learning process (Benson, 1989, p. 437), and the different levels of information in a lecture may be highlighted through a careful choice of language, including explicit macro markers (Chaudron & Richards, 1986; Allison & Tauroza, 1995; Jung, 2003; Titsworth & Kiewra, 2004). Previous research has focussed particularly on importance markers in native speaking (NS) lecturer discourse (e.g. Crawford Camiciottoli 2004; Deroey & Taverniers 2011, 2012; Deroey 2012, 2014, 2015). Our study expands this research to compare the use of lexicogrammatical importance markers in both NS and non-native speaker (NNS) lectures. A specially compiled corpus of about 365,000 words of Physical Science lectures was used in our study, featuring a balanced number of words from lectures in Italy (Johnson & Picciuolo, 2020; Picciuolo & Johnson, 2020) as well as in New Zealand, the UK and Malaysia (‘Engineering Lecture Corpus’ ). A qualitative analysis was done to annotate all instances of markers evaluating the importance of lecture content. These included verb, adjective or noun phrases containing an evaluation of importance. Assessment-related expressions were also marked. 378 separate instances were identified. More delicate analysis of the importance-marking phrases was done, with distributions and variations in frequent patterns identified in both NS and NNS lectures. While Verb phrases were found to be the most frequent in both NS and NNS lectures (62%), there was variation in the type of Verb patterns according to NS and NNS, as well as in verb choice. In general, though importance markers were distributed evenly over NS (=191) and NNS (=187) lectures, NS showed more variety than NNS in the type of pattern used, with adjective, metanoun and assessment-related expressions as well as idiomatic expressions figuring more frequently than in NNS, although there were significant differences also within the NS and NNS sub-corpora themselves. Whether these findings show that NNS are more aware of the risks of misunderstanding among their international student audiences (House, 2003; Mauranen, 2006), and thus use a smaller variety of less ambiguous importance markers, or that NNS have fewer language resources to draw on in the first place, awareness-raising among EMI lecturers is vital when preparing teacher training materials, given the expansion of ELF in international academic contexts where both lecturers and students are non-native speakers. References Allison, D., & Tauroza S. (1995). The effect of discourse organisation on lecture comprehension. English for Specific Purposes 14: 157-173. Benson, M.J. (1989). The Academic Listening Task: a case study. TESOL quarterly, vol. 23(3) 421-445. Chaudron, C., & Richards J. C. (1986). The effect of discourse markers on the comprehension of lectures. Applied Linguistics, vol. 7 (2) 113-127. Crawford Camiciottoli, B. (2004). Audience-oriented relevance markers in business studies lectures. In Del Lungo Camiciotti, G. & Tognini Bonelli, E. (Eds.), Academic Discourse: New Insights into Evaluation. Peter Lang, pp. 81–98. Deroey, K. L. B. (2012). What they highlight is: the discourse functions of basic wh-clefts in lectures. Journal of English for Academic Purposes 11/2: 112–24. Deroey, K.L.B. (2014). ‘Anyway, the point I'm making is': lexicogrammatical relevance marking in lectures. In Vandelanotte L., Kristin, D. Caroline G. & Ditte K. (Eds.), Recent advances in Corpus Linguistics: Developing and exploiting corpora, Amsterdam/New York, Rodopi, 265-291. Deroey, K. L. B. (2015) Marking importance in lectures: Interactive and Textual Orientation. Applied Linguistics 2015: 36/1: 51-72. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2011). A corpus-based study of lecture functions. Moderna Sprak 105/2: 1–22. Deroey, K. L. B., & Taverniers, M. (2012). Just remember this: Lexicogrammatical relevance markers in lectures. English for Specific Purposes. 31 (4) 221-233. House, J. (2003). Misunderstanding in intercultural university encounters. In House J., Kasper G and Ross S. (Eds.), Misunderstanding in social life: discourse approaches to problematic talk, London: Longman, 22-56. Johnson, J. H., & Picciuolo, M. (2020). Interaction in spoken academic discourse in an EMI context: the use of questions. Conference proceedings of the Congress UPV 6th International Conference on Higher Education Advances (HEAd’20) Domenech, J., Merello, P., de la Poza, E. & Peña-Ortiz, R. (Eds.), Editorial Universitat Politècnica de València, pp. 211-219. Mauranen, A. (2006). Signalling and preventing misunderstanding in English as a lingua franca communication. International Journal of the Sociology of Language, 177: 123-150. Picciuolo, M., & Johnson, J. H. (2020). Contrasting EMI lecturers’ perceptions with practices at the University of Bologna. In Miller, D.R. (Ed.), Quaderni del CeSLiC. Occasional papers. Bologna: Centro di Studi Linguistico-Culturali (CeSLiC), Università di Bologna. AlmaDL, p. 23. http://amsacta.unibo.it/6399/ Titsworth, S. B., & Kiewra, K.A. (2004). Spoken organizational lecture cues and student notetaking as facilitators of student learning. Contemporary Educational Psychology 29: 447-461. [less ▲]

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See detailLecturer training for English Medium Instruction: what and how?
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Deroey, Katrien (Ed.) Innovation, exploration and transformation. Proceedings of the 2019 BALEAP Conference (2021)

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See detailComparing Academic Languages: German, English, French
Huemer, Birgit UL; Deroey, Katrien UL; Lejot, Eve UL

Scientific Conference (2019, October 30)

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See detailBracketing in student writing: its uses (and abuses)
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, July 23)

This paper reports on the use of bracketed text in a large corpus of student writing. The function of bracketing has been neglected in academic writing research and coursebooks. Yet it is closely related ... [more ▼]

This paper reports on the use of bracketed text in a large corpus of student writing. The function of bracketing has been neglected in academic writing research and coursebooks. Yet it is closely related to important text construction issues such as information packaging, coherence, clarity, conciseness, intertextual framing and sourcing. With a view to informing academic writing description and instruction, we examined the relationship between bracketed text and its cotext in a wide variety of disciplines and assignment genres. The relationships are described using an adaptation of Halliday and Matthiessen’s (2014) logico-semantic framework of clausal relationships. To better understand and teach the use of this information packaging feature, we studied the relationship between bracketed text and its cotext in the British Academic Written English (BAWE) corpus of high-graded student assignments. Using Sketch Engine and corpus query language, we extracted a random sample of 2000 instances of bracketing in running text only. This subcorpus is composed of 500 instances from each of the four main disciplinary groupings (Arts and Humanities, Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, Social Sciences) and contains instances from most of the BAWE assignment genres. The concordances were imported into a database table in FileMaker Pro. This database programme facilitates coding by limiting choices depending on previous selections and thus guiding the coder through the analytical steps. For the analysis of the data, it offers flexibility for grouping records and aggregating results on different levels. The logico-semantic framework used in systemic functional linguistics to classify the relationships between clauses (Halliday & Matthiessen, 2014) served as our starting point to classify the relationships between bracketed text and cotext. This framework distinguishes two fundamental logico-semantic relationships: expansion, which ‘relates phenomena as being of the same order of experience’, and projection, which ‘relates phenomena of one order of experience (the processes of saying and thinking) to phenomena of a higher order (semiotic phenomena – what people say and think)’ (p. 443). The latter contains three subtypes: elaboration (‘one clause elaborates on the meaning of another by further specifying or describing it’) (p. 461), enhancement (‘one clause (or subcomplex) enhances the meaning of another by qualifying it) (p. 476) and extension (‘one clause extends the meaning of another by adding something new to it’) (p. 471). This framework was refined and expanded through several stages of interrating and discussion in order to reflect our findings. We first analysed a random sample of 1000 instances from the whole BAWE corpus. With the resulting adapted classificatory framework we next independently analysed a quarter of our subcorpus of 2000 concordances. This led to further refinement of the framework and classificatory criteria. Finally, we each analyzed a different set of concordances from the disciplinary groupings. Disciplinary informants were consulted where needed. Our analysis revealed four major logico-semantic relationships between the bracketed text and cotext: in addition to Halliday & Matthiessen’s (2014) projection (1) and expansion (elaboration (2), enhancement (3, 4), extension (5)), we identified bracketed text functioning as intratextual reference (6) and code (7). The few instances that could not be confidently classified were assigned to a ‘hard to classify’ category. (1) However the anticipated number of children per woman in Europe and the USA is still near or above two (Bongaarts, 1999), showing that many are still having children. (2) Many of these injures are healed fractures and breaks occurring around the torso (upper body). (3) It is dated to the reign of Nectanebo II (360-343 BC). (4) Acetanilide (4.78g, 35.4 mmol) was dissolved in cold, glacial acetic acid (25ml, 437.1 mmol) (5) Parmenides decision to include a cosmology that he has already (apparently) proved to be flawed is an interesting one to say the least. (6) This is called circular polarization (figure 5) and is the natural state of white light. (7) Stronger field ligands such as (PPh 3) and (NCS) increase the splitting. Projection was –perhaps not surprisingly- the most common relationship by far, although markedly less frequent in the Physical Sciences. Expansion was mainly achieved through elaboration, with restatements (2) and abbreviations predominating. Enhancement relationships were mostly temporal locations (3) or measurements (4). Extension was relatively rare (5). Intratextual references (6) took various forms, such as figures, appendices, equations, and line numbers for quoted text. Bracketed code was a marked feature of the Physical Sciences, occurring in formulae and enclosing symbols or abbreviations (7). Overall, students’ use of bracketed text appeared to reflect disciplinary conventions and reflected the genre goals of assignments by demonstrating knowledge, understanding and appropriate source use. Contrary to expectations, instances where the bracketed text seemed superfluous or adversely affected coherence were rare. We conclude by discussing what these findings mean for academic writing instruction. Reference Halliday, M. A. K., & Matthiessen, C. M. I. M. (2014). Halliday's introduction to functional grammar (4 ed.). Abingdon: Routledge. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching and learning in an internationalized context: challenges and strategies
Deroey, Katrien UL

Presentation (2019, April 26)

The internationalization of higher education has led to a variety of contexts in which native and non-native speakers of English teach students with different cultural, educational and linguistic ... [more ▼]

The internationalization of higher education has led to a variety of contexts in which native and non-native speakers of English teach students with different cultural, educational and linguistic backgrounds through the medium of English. In this talk, I will survey the key issues associated with ‘English Medium Instruction’ for lecturers and students. In addition, we will look at linguistic and pedagogical strategies that can facilitate teaching and learning in these contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailHow can we support lecturers in English-medium instruction?
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2019, April 13)

English-medium instruction (EMI) is a worldwide phenomenon. EMI language and communication issues (e.g. Hu et al., 2014; Murray, 2015; Werther et al., 2014) have led to calls for EAP practitioners to ... [more ▼]

English-medium instruction (EMI) is a worldwide phenomenon. EMI language and communication issues (e.g. Hu et al., 2014; Murray, 2015; Werther et al., 2014) have led to calls for EAP practitioners to collaborate with lecturers and other HE stakeholders to explore ways in which these lecturers can be supported and teaching standards ensured (Coleman, 2006; Doiz et al., 2013; Dubow & Gundermann, 2017). The design and implementation of EMI training and support programmes can be an especially challenging task for EAP practitioners. First, lecturers may not recognize the need for support and may be reluctant to be assessed. Second, we need to factor in practical considerations such as their limited availability and possible reluctance to attend ‘classes’ with colleagues. Third, we have limited resources in terms of specialized standardized tests, training materials and research literature that could inform our 'course' design. Innovative approaches are therefore needed to factor in all these circumstances. This paper has two main parts. First I summarize research on the challenges EMI lecturers face, including the results of a needs analysis among lecturers at the University of Luxembourg and my work on lecture discourse organization (Deroey, 2015). From the relatively few studies that exist, we will see that lecturers tend to believe they have sufficient English language skills and that reduced interactivity is a particularly common issue. Second, I survey different support and training schemes at HE institutions across the world. Here, it will become clear that work on relevant pedagogical skills needs to be included and an apparently ‘remedial’ approach should be avoided if we want to get lecturers on board. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 141 (4 UL)
See detailAnyway, the point is’: a corpus study of lexicogrammatical importance markers in lectures
Deroey, Katrien UL

Presentation (2019, March 18)

In this talk, I show how lecturers verbally mark comparatively (un)important points in a large corpus of lectures (British Academic Spoken English corpus). This kind of discourse organization is thought ... [more ▼]

In this talk, I show how lecturers verbally mark comparatively (un)important points in a large corpus of lectures (British Academic Spoken English corpus). This kind of discourse organization is thought to be beneficial to students’ note-taking, comprehension and recall. We’ll see that lecturers use a wide variety of lexicogrammatical importance markers. Examples include ‘the point is’, ‘remember’, ‘I want to stress’, ‘anyway’, ‘I don’t know’ and ‘etcetera’. Some of the key findings I’ll be highlighting are that (1) students often need an understanding of the lecture genre and the cotext of the markers to be able to identify these discourse markers; that (2) studying only transcripts of spoken discourse without considering prosodic and multimodal features affects the validity of results; and that (3) to create English for Academic Purposes teaching materials we need to examine authentic lecture texts rather than rely on our intuitions. [less ▲]

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See detailPanel discussion: academic writing across languages: multilingual and contrastive approaches in higher education
Deroey, Katrien UL

in Huemer, Birgit; Lejot, Eve; Deroey, Katrien (Eds.) Academic writing across languages: multilingual and contrastive approaches in higher education (2019)

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See detailThe discourse structure of literature review paragraphs: a multilingual study
Deroey, Katrien UL; Huemer, Birgit UL; Lejot, Eve UL

in Schreibwissenschaft (2019)

This paper examines literature reviews in 12 master’s dissertations written in German, English and French. Specifically, we analysed the discourse structure of 155 paragraphs to assess the extent to which ... [more ▼]

This paper examines literature reviews in 12 master’s dissertations written in German, English and French. Specifically, we analysed the discourse structure of 155 paragraphs to assess the extent to which students manage to write a coherent review combining literature reports with their own ‘voice’. The study was motivated by the design of a multilingual academic writing course at the University of Luxembourg Language Centre. The analysis distinguished three main discourse elements, nl. report, discussion and text orientation. The data reveal considerable variation in the frequency with which these combine to form different paragraph types. However, in all three languages, report discourse uses the same quotation and reformulation strategies and tends to employ ‘list’ structures with few cohesive links. Discussion elements are generally not elaborated and the writer’s voice is weak. Text organization uses the same linguistic strategies and is mainly used to orientate readers rather than to summarize or signal transitions. Pedagogical implications for multilingual academic writing courses are discussed. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 268 (9 UL)
See detailAcademic writing across languages: multilingual and contrastive approaches in higher education
Huemer, Birgit UL; Lejot, Eve UL; Deroey, Katrien UL

Book published by Böhlau (2019)

This book explores how academic writing varies across languages in order to enrich concepts for teaching academic writing in multilingual environments. The contributions focus on teaching approaches ... [more ▼]

This book explores how academic writing varies across languages in order to enrich concepts for teaching academic writing in multilingual environments. The contributions focus on teaching approaches, linguistic features and writing practices in multilingual contexts. It aims to discuss how these findings could be applied in order to develop multilingual approaches for teaching academic writing at the university. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 426 (38 UL)
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Peer Reviewed
See detailDesigning personalized, interactive materials for presentation skills
Deroey, Katrien UL

Scientific Conference (2018, June 09)

In this talk I demonstrate how we can design and adapt materials for presentation skills to build on students’ individual needs and disciplinary backgrounds in an interactive way. The context for this is ... [more ▼]

In this talk I demonstrate how we can design and adapt materials for presentation skills to build on students’ individual needs and disciplinary backgrounds in an interactive way. The context for this is a conference skills course I’ve designed and successfully taught for several years. The PhD students on this course vary greatly in their presentation skills, experience and disciplinary background. After an overview of the course content and format, I illustrate how students’ own presentations and research can be integrated so as to enhance personal relevance and interactivity. Aspects of this personalized, interactive course design include filming student presentations, structured peer feedback and reflection, a pre-course questionnaire, and tasks requiring them to work with their conference calls, research, texts, visuals and experiences. I conclude with a summary of course feedback, highlighting what students reported as being particularly useful and what they would add or change. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 111 (1 UL)