References of "De Witte, P. A. M"
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See detailPharmacological characterization of an antisense knockdown zebrafish model of Dravet syndrome: Inhibition of epileptic seizures by the serotonin agonist fenfluramine
Zhang, Yang UL; Kecskés, A.; Copmans, D. et al

in PLoS ONE (2015), 10(5),

Dravet syndrome (DS) is one of the most pharmacoresistant and devastating forms of childhood epilepsy syndromes. Distinct de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene are responsible for over 80% of DS cases ... [more ▼]

Dravet syndrome (DS) is one of the most pharmacoresistant and devastating forms of childhood epilepsy syndromes. Distinct de novo mutations in the SCN1A gene are responsible for over 80% of DS cases. While DS is largely resistant to treatment with existing anti-epileptic drugs, promising results have been obtained in clinical trials with human patients treated with the serotonin agonist fenfluramine as an add-on therapeutic. We developed a zebrafish model of DS using morpholino antisense oligomers (MOs) targeting scn1Lab, the zebrafish ortholog of SCN1A. Zebrafish larvae with an antisense knockdown of scn1Lab (scn1Lab morphants) were characterized by automated behavioral tracking and high-resolution video imaging, in addition to measuring brain activity through local field potential recordings. Our findings reveal that scn1Lab morphants display hyperactivity, convulsive seizure-like behavior, loss of posture, repetitive jerking and a myoclonic seizure-like pattern. The occurrence of spontaneous seizures was confirmed by local field potential recordings of the forebrain, measuring epileptiform discharges. Furthermore, we show that these larvae are remarkably sensitive to hyperthermia, similar to what has been described for mouse models of DS, as well as for human DS patients. Pharmacological evaluation revealed that sodium valproate and fenfluramine significantly reduce epileptiform discharges in scn1Lab morphants. Our findings for this zebrafish model of DS are in accordance with clinical data for human DS patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating effective seizure inhibition of fenfluramine in an animal model of Dravet syndrome. Moreover, these results provide a basis for identifying novel analogs with improved activity and significantly milder or no side effects. © 2015 Zhang et al. [less ▲]

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See detailDe novo loss-of-function mutations in CHD2 cause a fever-sensitive myoclonic epileptic encephalopathy sharing features with dravet syndrome
Suls, A.; Jaehn, J. A.; Kecskés, A. et al

in American Journal of Human Genetics (2013), 93(5), 967-975

Dravet syndrome is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by infantile onset of therapy-resistant, fever-sensitive seizures followed by cognitive decline. Mutations in SCN1A explain about 75% of cases ... [more ▼]

Dravet syndrome is a severe epilepsy syndrome characterized by infantile onset of therapy-resistant, fever-sensitive seizures followed by cognitive decline. Mutations in SCN1A explain about 75% of cases with Dravet syndrome; 90% of these mutations arise de novo. We studied a cohort of nine Dravet-syndrome-affected individuals without an SCN1A mutation (these included some atypical cases with onset at up to 2 years of age) by using whole-exome sequencing in proband-parent trios. In two individuals, we identified a de novo loss-of-function mutation in CHD2 (encoding chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2). A third CHD2 mutation was identified in an epileptic proband of a second (stage 2) cohort. All three individuals with a CHD2 mutation had intellectual disability and feversensitive generalized seizures, as well as prominent myoclonic seizures starting in the second year of life or later. To explore the functional relevance of CHD2 haploinsufficiency in an in vivo model system, we knocked down chd2 in zebrafish by using targeted morpholino antisense oligomers. chd2-knockdown larvae exhibited altered locomotor activity, and the epileptic nature of this seizure-like behavior was confirmed by field-potential recordings that revealed epileptiform discharges similar to seizures in affected persons. Both altered locomotor activity and epileptiform discharges were absent in appropriate control larvae. Our study provides evidence that de novo loss-of-function mutations in CHD2 are a cause of epileptic encephalopathy with generalized seizures. © 2013 by The American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved. [less ▲]

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See detailOptimization and Pharmacological Validation of a Leukocyte Migration Assay in Zebrafish Larvae for the Rapid In Vivo Bioactivity Analysis of Anti-Inflammatory Secondary Metabolites
Cordero-Maldonado, M. L.; Siverio-Mota, D.; Vicet-Muro, L. et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(10),

Over the past decade, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as an attractive model for in vivo drug discovery. In this study, we explore the suitability of zebrafish larvae to rapidly evaluate the anti ... [more ▼]

Over the past decade, zebrafish (Danio rerio) have emerged as an attractive model for in vivo drug discovery. In this study, we explore the suitability of zebrafish larvae to rapidly evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of natural products (NPs) and medicinal plants used in traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. First, we optimized a zebrafish assay for leukocyte migration. Inflammation was induced in four days post-fertilization (dpf) zebrafish larvae by tail transection and co-incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS), resulting in a robust recruitment of leukocytes to the zone of injury. Migrating zebrafish leukocytes were detected in situ by myeloperoxidase (MPO) staining, and anti-inflammatory activity was semi-quantitatively scored using a standardized scale of relative leukocyte migration (RLM). Pharmacological validation of this optimized assay was performed with a panel of anti-inflammatory drugs, demonstrating a concentration-responsive inhibition of leukocyte migration for both steroidal and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (SAIDs and NSAIDs). Subsequently, we evaluated the bioactivity of structurally diverse NPs with well-documented anti-inflammatory properties. Finally, we further used this zebrafish-based assay to quantify the anti-inflammatory activity in the aqueous and methanolic extracts of several medicinal plants. Our results indicate the suitability of this LPS-enhanced leukocyte migration assay in zebrafish larvae as a front-line screening platform in NP discovery, including for the bioassay-guided isolation of anti-inflammatory secondary metabolites from complex NP extracts. © 2013 Cordero-Maldonado et al. [less ▲]

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See detailA phenotypic screen in zebrafish identifies a novel small-molecule inducer of ectopic tail formation suggestive of alterations in non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling
Gebruers, E.; Cordero-Maldonado, M. L.; Gray, A. I. et al

in PLoS ONE (2013), 8(12),

Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive model for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and characterization of pharmacologically active small molecules of natural origin. We carried out a ... [more ▼]

Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive model for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and characterization of pharmacologically active small molecules of natural origin. We carried out a zebrafish-based phenotypic screen of over 3000 plant-derived secondary metabolite extracts with the goal of identifying novel small-molecule modulators of the BMP and Wnt signaling pathways. One of the bioactive plant extracts identified in this screen - Jasminum gilgianum, an Oleaceae species native to Papua New Guinea - induced ectopic tails during zebrafish embryonic development. As ectopic tail formation occurs when BMP or non-canonical Wnt signaling is inhibited during the tail protrusion process, we suspected a constituent of this extract to act as a modulator of these pathways. A bioassay-guided isolation was carried out on the basis of this zebrafish phenotype, identifying para-coumaric acid methyl ester (pCAME) as the active compound. We then performed an in-depth phenotypic analysis of pCAME-treated zebrafish embryos, including a tissue-specific marker analysis of the secondary tails. We found pCAME to synergize with the BMP-inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 in inducing ectopic tails, and causing convergence-extension defects in compound-treated embryos. These results indicate that pCAME may interfere with non-canonical Wnt signaling. Inhibition of Jnk, a downstream target of Wnt/PCP signaling (via morpholino antisense knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with the kinase inhibitor SP600125) phenocopied pCAME-treated embryos. However, immunoblotting experiments revealed pCAME to not directly inhibit Jnk-mediated phosphorylation of c-Jun, suggesting additional targets of SP600125, and/or other pathways, as possibly being involved in the ectopic tail formation activity of pCAME. Further investigation of pCAME's mechanism of action will help determine this compound's pharmacological utility. © 2013 Gebruers et al. [less ▲]

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