References of "De Winter, Lieven"
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See detailLa participation électorale réelle et potentielle
De Winter, Lieven; Ackaert, Johan; Meulewaeter, Conrad et al

in Baudewyns, Pierre (Ed.) Être électeur en Wallonie: Le comportement électoral des Wallons lors des élections législatives de 2007 et de 2010 (2015)

Detailed reference viewed: 36 (1 UL)
See detailRegeringsvorming in België
DE WINTER, Lieven; Dumont, Patrick UL

in Devos, Carl (Ed.) Een politieke geschiedenis van morgen (2014)

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See detailMet man en macht. Over mensen, macht en beleid bij lokale coalitievorming
Ackaert, Johan; De Winter, Lieven; Dumont, Patrick UL et al

in Deschouwer, Kris; Verthé, Tom; Rihoux, Benoît (Eds.) Op zoek naar de kiezers. Lokale partijafdelingen en de gemeenteraadsverkiezingen van oktober 2012 (2013)

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See detailPuzzles of Coalition Formation. Coalition Theory and Deviant Cases
Andeweg, Rudy; De Winter, Lieven; Dumont, Patrick UL

Book published by Routledge (2011)

Detailed reference viewed: 61 (3 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailParty system(s) and electoral behaviour in Belgium: From stability to balkanisation
De Winter, Lieven; Swyngedouw, Marc; Dumont, Patrick UL

in WEST EUROPEAN POLITICS (2006), 29(5), 933-956

Belgium has one of the most fragmented party systems of any modern democracy. This article asks the following questions: is party fragmentation linked to the importance of the ethno-regionalist vote or to ... [more ▼]

Belgium has one of the most fragmented party systems of any modern democracy. This article asks the following questions: is party fragmentation linked to the importance of the ethno-regionalist vote or to the rules of the electoral system? Has party fragmentation also produced centrifugal or polarised multipartyism (between the regions, but also within Flanders, given the spectacular rise of the Vlaams Blok)? What explains the difference in party fragmentation between Flanders and Wallonia? What are the dimensions of party competition in each community and what are the socio-demographic and attitudinal characteristics of the different electorates? Which steps have the political elites taken to cope with the increasing fragmentation of the party landscape and growing voter volatility? To what extent has the increasing divergence between the regional party systems led to the building of asymmetrical coalitions at the federal and regional levels of government? The splitting of the Belgian party system into two, albeit still fragmented, party systems has further complicated the problems of coordination within a polarised, multicleavage and multilevel system that seriously undermines the stability of the entire political system. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (1 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDo Belgian parties undermine the democratic chain of delegation?
De Winter, Lieven; Dumont, Patrick UL

in WEST EUROPEAN POLITICS (2006), 29(5), 957-976

The Belgian party-archy violates the ideal-type chain of parliamentary delegation in many ways, insofar as political parties play a predominant role at each stage. They channel the delegation of power ... [more ▼]

The Belgian party-archy violates the ideal-type chain of parliamentary delegation in many ways, insofar as political parties play a predominant role at each stage. They channel the delegation of power from voters to MPs, from Parliament to the cabinet, from the collective cabinet to individual ministers, and from ministers to their civil servants. Hence, they can be considered the effective principals in the polity, and many actors of the parliamentary chain of delegation, such as MPs, ministers, and civil servants have been reduced to mere party agents. The extreme fragmentation of the Belgian party system in combination with its increasing need for multilevel coordination have further enhanced the position of political parties in the Belgian polity. Yet, at the same time (since the early 1990s), Belgium has also witnessed a gradual decline in the informal system of partitocratic delegation and clientelistic excesses, thereby giving back part of their autonomy to some formal agents, such as the cabinet, top civil servants and some MPs. Still, one can wonder whether these corrections are sufficient to counter the strong outburst of public dissatisfaction with the way parties have run the country in past decades. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (3 UL)