References of "Danescu, Elena 50022819"
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See detailChallenges in completing EMU: asymmetric competition vs fiscal harmonisation. A case study of the Benelux countries
Danescu, Elena UL

in Journal of Contemporary European Research (2023)

This paper aims to investigate the concept, context and socio-economic consequences of fiscal competition in the integrated economic space of EMU in completion, to pinpoint the positive and negative ... [more ▼]

This paper aims to investigate the concept, context and socio-economic consequences of fiscal competition in the integrated economic space of EMU in completion, to pinpoint the positive and negative factors at work via a case study of the Benelux countries – both founder members of the EU and pioneers of EMU – and to examine the impact on European and international regulations in the field. In particular, it will endeavour to provide a comprehensive interpretation of fiscal policy in the Benelux countries via a comparative approach and from a historical perspective. It will look at the development of respective domestic fiscal policies, driven by national interests and by membership of a Community that is subject to requirements in terms of harmonisation and taxation, but also by constant contact (and frequent clashes) with the multilateral international environment. [less ▲]

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See detailLe rapport Werner en suspens. Les débats autour de l'Union économique et monétaire en 1973
Danescu, Elena UL

in Wilkens, Andreas (Ed.) Une année particulière: 1973 et les tourments de l'Europe (2023)

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See detailRegional heterogeneity and individual characteristics in the development of a European tax policy: historical insights from Luxembourg
Danescu, Elena UL

in Danescu, Elena; Dima, Alina Mihaela (Eds.) Fostering recovery through metaverse business modelling - An interdisciplinary analysis of the new paradigm shift (2023, March)

Luxembourg is currently one of the most politically stable, consensus-oriented, and prosperous countries in the world, characterised by am advanced social market economy, and a level of material wellbeing ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is currently one of the most politically stable, consensus-oriented, and prosperous countries in the world, characterised by am advanced social market economy, and a level of material wellbeing above the EU average. Its strong fiscal position is well illustrated by a longstanding AAA credit rating, a significant accumulation of government financial assets, and a distinct fiscal approach. In this light, this paper aims to investigate the specific features of the tax system in Luxembourg from a multidisciplinary perspective by analysing historical sources and exploring the development of these particularities over time, their impact on the socioeconomic context and their repercussions for the European integration process, especially in the design and completion of Economic and Monetary Union (EMU). [less ▲]

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See detailEconomic Ideas and Political Action in Shaping Economic and Monetary Union: Pierre Werner and Luxembourg
Danescu, Elena UL

in Danescu, Elena; Dima, Alina (Eds.) Fostering recovery through metaverse business modelling - An interdisciplinary analysis of the new paradigm shift (2022, November 19)

The international financial centre in Luxembourg grew considerably in the 1960s, driven by proactive government policy, flexible regulation, a willingness to harness external opportunities and the ... [more ▼]

The international financial centre in Luxembourg grew considerably in the 1960s, driven by proactive government policy, flexible regulation, a willingness to harness external opportunities and the establishment of Community institutions and European funding institutions in the country. As Luxembourg was in a currency union with Belgium within the Belgium-Luxembourg Economic Union and did not have its own Central Bank, these developments were all the more meaningful. When the European integration process experienced a series of major crises – including the failure of the European Defence Community and European Political Community in 1954, the empty chair crisis in 1966 and General de Gaulle’s veto on British accession in 1962 and 1967 –, Luxembourg set out on the path of European monetary integration, under the impetus of Finance Minister and Prime Minister Pierre Werner. In October 1970, the Werner Report provided a detailed blueprint for Economic and Monetary Union and laid the foundations for the euro. The Luxembourg financial centre would serve as a “laboratory” for the future single currency. This paper makes extensive use of relevant European and international archives and original interviews, adopting an interdisciplinary approach to analyse Luxembourg’s leading role in reconciling different views on EMU and fostering political commitment to a European currency among the Member States. [less ▲]

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See detailLuxembourg Economy
Danescu, Elena UL

in Hartley, Cathy (Ed.) Western Europe 2023 (2022)

Situated in the centre of Europe and bordered by two major powers, France and Germany, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg has always sought to maintain an openness to its neighbours, for reasons of security ... [more ▼]

Situated in the centre of Europe and bordered by two major powers, France and Germany, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg has always sought to maintain an openness to its neighbours, for reasons of security and to give itself access to larger markets. In the 19th century Luxembourg was part of the German customs and trade union (Zollverein). Following the First World War, the country embarked on a process of economic and monetary integration with Belgium via the BLU and it played a driving role in the Benelux Economic Union. Following the Second World War, it was ultimately with the European project that these integration efforts began to bear fruit and assume a new dimension. If Luxembourg is to safeguard its welfare state and boost competitiveness, especially in view of the prevailing uncertainty of the current international and geopolitical climate, it must tackle several recurrent issues (including an ageing population, unemployment among young people, the sustainability of the social security system). [less ▲]

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See detailThe Werner report and the financial crisis during the 1970s
Danescu, Elena UL; Tedeschi, Paolo

in Leboutte, René; Tedeschi, Paolo (Eds.) Euro changes: European Responses to Economics and Social Changes. From de 1970s to the new Millennium. (2022)

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See detailEuropean Integration Studies through Oral History and Multimedia Research - Innovative methodologie and new content creation
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2022, July 11)

Presentation of three study cases: 1.Oral Historyand MultimediaResearch–Project ‘’Pierre Werner and Europe’’ (2011-2017) 2.Collaborative Oral History Project –‘’Brexit Reality Portraits’’ (2021-2022) 3 ... [more ▼]

Presentation of three study cases: 1.Oral Historyand MultimediaResearch–Project ‘’Pierre Werner and Europe’’ (2011-2017) 2.Collaborative Oral History Project –‘’Brexit Reality Portraits’’ (2021-2022) 3.Oral History Research Project –‘’The role of women in European and international relations in Luxembourg (after the Second World War)’’ (2022-2025) [less ▲]

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See detailSustainable Governance Indicators (SGI) 2022 - Luxembourg Country Analysis
Danescu, Elena UL; Thomas, Adrien UL; Clément, Franz et al

in Sustainable Governance Indicators (SGI) 2022 - Luxembourg Chapter (2022)

The Grand Duchy is considered as the third most open economy in the world, with an openness rate of 158.2% of GDP. The country has an export-intensive economy, with a recurrent trade deficit. The share of ... [more ▼]

The Grand Duchy is considered as the third most open economy in the world, with an openness rate of 158.2% of GDP. The country has an export-intensive economy, with a recurrent trade deficit. The share of foreign trade in Luxembourg’s GDP is currently higher then 30%. Even in the context of the Covid-19 crisis, the country is pursuing its strategy of public investments. Direct and indirect investments envisaged to reach 4.3% of GDP in 2021, a significantly higher cap than the average of 3.7% during the years 2015-2019.Luxembourg has a highly qualified workforce (59.6% of the active population). Over the past 12 month the overall employment growth rate was 1.6%, and that related to the cross-border workers was 2,2%. Two-thirds of jobs created in Luxembourg are aimed at higher education graduates.With an outstanding social security system, a level of material wellbeing above the EU average and sound public finances, Luxembourg is currently one of the most politically stable and prosperous countries in the world. Its strong fiscal position is well illustrated by a longstanding AAA credit rating, a significant accumulation of government financial assets, and a balanced, healthy fiscal position. The public administration, almost completely digitalised, is efficient and the overall economic outlook remains stable. [less ▲]

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See detailDemocracy and the digital revolution – steering an evolving paradigm
Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2022, June 29)

Knowledge-based societies rely to a large extent on intangible assets and digital technologies, and these are having an increasing impact on information systems, power, governance and citizenship, driven ... [more ▼]

Knowledge-based societies rely to a large extent on intangible assets and digital technologies, and these are having an increasing impact on information systems, power, governance and citizenship, driven by a proliferation of stakeholders and networks at multiple levels (states, international organisations, private companies, civil society and citizens. There is a clear need for international regulation in this area. This paper takes a multidisciplinary approach, combining an examination of theoretical, conceptual and methodological frameworks with an analysis of relevant public and private archives, with a threefold objective: 1) to outline issues and challenges in terms of human rights, freedom and democracy; 2) to identify the regulatory provisions adopted at European and international level to promote accountability, civic engagement and digital literacy through new forms of (mediated) democracy; and 3) to identify future prospects, risks and uncertainties in the era of artificial intelligence. [less ▲]

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See detailSmall States Diplomacy in Action. Luxembourg in the European Integration History
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2022, May 30)

After the Second World War, in line with its new strategic choice Luxembourg resolutely set out on the road to international multilateralism and European integration, being in 1951 one of the six founding ... [more ▼]

After the Second World War, in line with its new strategic choice Luxembourg resolutely set out on the road to international multilateralism and European integration, being in 1951 one of the six founding members of the European Coal and Steel Community (ECSC), and in 1952 - the workplace of the newly established European Community institutions. Since then, Luxembourg has played and continues to act as a mediator and a force for ideas in the EU, either as a member State, or through some of its leaders (including Joseph Bech, Pierre Werner, Gaston Thorn, Jacques Santer, Jean-Claude Juncker). Based on a wide range of sources from public and private archives, this presentation aims to illustrate how the Grand-Duchy had become a master of small states diplomacy and a consensus builder in the European integration history, and to demonstrate that the influential nature if its leadership gave Luxembourg a role that far outweighed the country’s socio-economic impact. [less ▲]

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See detailBuilding a Smart Nation: Luxembourg Tackling the Fourth Industrial Revolution
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2022, May 17)

Beginning in the 20th century, Luxembourg experienced several periods of transition. The largely agriculture-based economy became industrialized, driven by a powerful steel industry which remained the ... [more ▼]

Beginning in the 20th century, Luxembourg experienced several periods of transition. The largely agriculture-based economy became industrialized, driven by a powerful steel industry which remained the dominant sector from the immediate post-Second World War years to the mid-1970s. In 1974 the steel industry began to decline, marking the end of the ‘Trente Glorieuses’. Luxembourg was forced to implement considerable structural changes and embarked on its second major transition, from an industrial economy to a service economy based on the financial sector. To guarantee its future position in a competitive globalized environment, the country needed to diversify its economy by focusing on state-of-the-art fields with high added value, while preserving the competitiveness of the financial sector. Luxembourg continued to prioritize innovation as the main driver of sustainable and inclusive growth, embarking on its digital transition in order to build a "smart nation". [less ▲]

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See detailLuxembourg – navigating the transition to the knowledge economy. A historical perspective
Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2022, May 13)

Luxembourg is a multicultural, multilingual and cross-border area par excellence that has always sought to maintain an openness to its neighbours, both for reasons of security and to give itself access to ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg is a multicultural, multilingual and cross-border area par excellence that has always sought to maintain an openness to its neighbours, both for reasons of security and to give itself access to larger markets. Despite its small geographical area, limited workforce and lack of natural resources, Luxembourg is currently first out of 196 countries worldwide in terms of GDP/capita (with 114 370 €/capita, representing 260% of the EU average).Thanks to a long-term strategic vision, political and institutional innovation and structural changes implemented in economy throughout the 20th century, the once bipolar agricultural/industrial society has become a competitive society based largely on knowledge-intensive services and centred on the financial sector, characterised by high-performing human capital, political stability, prosperity and a strong welfare system.Taking this observation as a starting point, adopting a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective and drawing on a wide range of European and international archive and institutional sources, the paper sets out to address the following research questions: what are the factors of change and the major challenges facing Luxembourg in the digital transition? What institutions and governance is it using to tackle these challenges? What are the risks, benefits and opportunities of this transformation over the long term? What are the country’s strengths in terms of competitiveness, and what are the weaknesses that might jeopardise its comparative advantages? What is the impact of digitalisation on the public sector and on the government’s links with business and the public at large? [less ▲]

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See detailThe Luxembourg Financial Ecosystem and the European Monetary Innovation. Cas Study on KBL, LuxSE and EIB (1957-1990)
Danescu, Elena UL; Cheng, Anqi

Scientific Conference (2022, April 26)

The Luxembourg international financial centre developed considerably during the 1960s, propelled by several factors including concerted government policy, flexible regulation and a willingness to harness ... [more ▼]

The Luxembourg international financial centre developed considerably during the 1960s, propelled by several factors including concerted government policy, flexible regulation and a willingness to harness opportunities at international level (such as the 1963 US interest equalisation tax and the Bundesbank provisions introduced in 1968 and 1974). The decision to establish various Community institutions (the ECSC High Authority in 1952) and European funding institutions (the European Investment Bank in 1968) in the country also had a decisive impact. The currency union with Belgium (BLEU, 1921) and the absence of a Luxembourg Central Bank made these developments all the more significant. Drawing on archives and oral history sources, this paper aims to illustrate the complexity and originality that characterised the development of the conceptual, political and regulatory context in Luxembourg in the 1960s-1990s, in what can be seen as a sui generis experiment and preparation for EMU. It will explore the changing financial ecosystem in Luxembourg and the collaborative efforts by its main stakeholders (banks, regulatory authorities, individuals, networks) - with a focus on KBL, LuxSE and EIB - to encourage financial and monetary innovation (via the EUA, ECU, and Eurco) before the introduction of the European single currency and to pave the way for the establishment and consolidation of the euro [less ▲]

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See detailLuxembourg and the creation of the European single currency - Lessons from the History
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2022, April 15)

In political terms, European integration and multilateral cooperation enabled Luxembourg to become an equal partner in the decision-making processes and leadership of European organizations. In economic ... [more ▼]

In political terms, European integration and multilateral cooperation enabled Luxembourg to become an equal partner in the decision-making processes and leadership of European organizations. In economic terms, these features gave the country the tools it needed to forge a development model that could underpin the creative growth of its social market economy, while preserving the majority of its vital interests—particularly the steel industry and the financial centre—over the long term. Focusing primarily on the 1970 Werner Report, which served as a blueprint for the European single currency - the euro - the presentation examines a key period in European integration history and one of the major European achievements of Luxembourg and of Pierre Werner (29 December 1913– 24 June 2002), former Prime Minister, Finance Minister and Foreign Minister of Luxembourg, who left his mark on the future of his country and is unanimously recognised as one of the architects of Economic and Monetary Union. [less ▲]

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See detailNetwork diplomacy in shaping European economic and monetary integration in the 1970s
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2022, March 09)

The Werner Committee's work was characterised by political and doctrinal differences between “economists” (the countries with weak currencies – France, Belgium and, to a certain extent, Italy) and ... [more ▼]

The Werner Committee's work was characterised by political and doctrinal differences between “economists” (the countries with weak currencies – France, Belgium and, to a certain extent, Italy) and “monetarists” (the countries with strong currencies – Germany and the Netherlands)– namely, those who saw monetary integration as a means of economic integration and those for whom it was the ultimate goal. The conflict was ultimately resolved by the adoption of a parallel approach between economic cooperation and monetary coordination in the Member States, a principle of equilibrium on the basis of which Pierre Werner was able to secure a consensus. This paper makes extensive use of Pierre Werner’s previously unpublished archives and a collection of original oral history accounts with key players of European monetary integration. An interdisciplinary approach, together with digital methodologies (network analysis and the TXM corpus analysis framework), will be used to explore the negotiations within the Werner Committee by examining the dynamics between group members, their emerging views on EMU, their political commitment to a European currency, the similarities and differences between their ideas, their personal networks, the influence of their respective countries, their theoretical and methodological input and their contribution to the political agreement. [less ▲]

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See detailReport 2019-2021, Europe Direct Information Centre at the University of Luxembourg
Danescu, Elena UL; Golini, Sonia UL

Report (2022)

Following its participation in the European Commission call for proposals in 2017, the University of Luxembourg was selected as a partner to run a Europe Direct Information Centre (EDIC) for the period ... [more ▼]

Following its participation in the European Commission call for proposals in 2017, the University of Luxembourg was selected as a partner to run a Europe Direct Information Centre (EDIC) for the period 2018-2021. The agreement establishing EDIC University of Luxembourg was signed on 28 March 2019 by Prof. Dr Stéphane Pallage, Rector of the University, and Yuriko Backes, Head of the European Commission Representation in Luxembourg. EDIC University of Luxembourg is geared towards a broad audience, with the aim of informing students, researchers, teachers and the general public about issues related to the European Union’s history and current affairs, as well as reflecting on potential future challenges. 29 Marc 2019 to 30 April 2021, EDIC University of Luxembourg had organized wide range of of lectures, seminars, discussions and exhibitions in cooperation with numerous partners from Luxembourg and worldwide. In the meantime, it had offered a vast variety of information about the history of European integration, the EU institutions, the workings and policies of a united Europe, as well as the place of Luxembourg and its key figures in the European integration history. Based in the Luxembourg Learning Centre (LLC) on Belval Campus, EDIC University of Luxembourg is managed by Dr Elena Danescu, a Research Scientist at the Luxembourg Centre for Contemporary and Digital History (C2DH) - the third interdisciplinary centre of the University of Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailTechnical Sovereignty and Digital Democracy in Europe – Follower or Influencer ? A New Media Approach
Danescu, Elena UL

Scientific Conference (2022, February 04)

The digital turn has considerably impacted geopolitics in terms of power, governance and regulation, leading to a proliferation of stakeholders and networks at multiple levels (states, international ... [more ▼]

The digital turn has considerably impacted geopolitics in terms of power, governance and regulation, leading to a proliferation of stakeholders and networks at multiple levels (states, international organisations, private companies, civil society and citizens), new dynamics of competition in a transnational space that is becoming increasingly virtual, borderless and deterritorialised (cyberspace), and novel forms of learning, work and human activity. Digital technologies have also brought about a paradigm shift in information and communication systems, with the emergence of new media (online platforms, interactive websites, algorithmic decision-making ecosystems, etc.) that will have a long-term impact on social and cultural practices, interpersonal and societal relations, the public sphere and the exercise of individual and collective democracy. [less ▲]

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See detailEurope between East and West - looking back, mooving forward
Danescu, Elena UL

Article for general public (2022)

“Deep divisions have emerged between East and West [Europe] on matters such as freedom, justice and democracy,” writes the University of Luxembourg’s Dr Elena Danescu. In this article, the researcher ... [more ▼]

“Deep divisions have emerged between East and West [Europe] on matters such as freedom, justice and democracy,” writes the University of Luxembourg’s Dr Elena Danescu. In this article, the researcher explores the origins of these divisions. [less ▲]

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See detailL'Europe sociale - mythe ou réalité? (L'Europe sociale - racines historiques, acteurs, modèle)
Danescu, Elena UL

Presentation (2022, January 11)

L’Europe sociale – mythe ou réalié?(L?Europe sociale -racines historiques, acteurs, modèle) Introduction (précisions terminologiques, racines historiques, contexte) II. Chronologie et jalons des ... [more ▼]

L’Europe sociale – mythe ou réalié?(L?Europe sociale -racines historiques, acteurs, modèle) Introduction (précisions terminologiques, racines historiques, contexte) II. Chronologie et jalons des initiatives d’une Europe sociale III. Changement de perspective IV. Le socle européen des droits sociaux IV. Chantiers actuels [less ▲]

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See detailEastern Europe 30 years after the fall of the Soviet Union: Hopes and disappointments of the democratic transition
Danescu, Elena UL; Grachev, Andreï

Presentation (2021, December 14)

The Winter Online Lecture Series on Europe will take place in December 2021 in connection with the courses “History of European integration (1919-1993)” (MAHEC-S1-M6i) and “Economic and social history of ... [more ▼]

The Winter Online Lecture Series on Europe will take place in December 2021 in connection with the courses “History of European integration (1919-1993)” (MAHEC-S1-M6i) and “Economic and social history of Europe after 1945” (MAHEC-S3-M5iii) from the Master in European Contemporary History, and the course “Democratic transitions in Central and Eastern Europe” (BCE-EU-301-04) from the Bachelor in European Cultures, with the aim of giving students on these programmes, as well as the wider academic community at the University of Luxembourg, the opportunity to find out about the history and workings of the European institutions in Luxembourg from new and unconventional angles and to discuss some of the milestones in contemporary European history with people who were involved in or witnessed these events. Each session (in French, with Q&A session in French and English) will be streamed via Webex and will include a presentation by a speaker, followed by a discussion with the audience and the opportunity to ask questions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 55 (3 UL)