References of "Damen, Ida"
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See detailThe Hubs: Design Insights for Walking Meeting Technology
Damen, Ida; Vos, Steven; Lallemand, Carine UL

in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (2021), 12935 LNCS

As an active form of meeting, walking meetings can be beneficial for office workers who often have a sedentary work routine. Despite their substantial benefits in terms of health, social interactions, and ... [more ▼]

As an active form of meeting, walking meetings can be beneficial for office workers who often have a sedentary work routine. Despite their substantial benefits in terms of health, social interactions, and creativity, walking meetings are not yet widely adopted. Some key barriers limiting their social acceptance and wider adoption, for instance, the difficulty to present files or take notes, might be addressed by technology. Using the Hubs - a network of stand-up meeting stations - as a design exemplar, we conducted a scenario-based survey (N = 186) to provide insights into how technological solutions can support the practice of walking meetings. Focusing on the size of the group and type of meetings, we identify scenarios of use and discuss design implications for the development of future technologies and service design components to support walking meetings. © 2021, IFIP International Federation for Information Processing. [less ▲]

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See detailPositionPeak: Stimulating position changes during meetings
Damen, Ida; Heerkens, Lidewij; Van Den Broek, Annabel et al

in Proceedings of Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (2020)

In office environments, workers spend the majority of their workday sitting in a static position behind a desk or around a meeting table. Prolonged sitting time and sedentary behavior have severe negative ... [more ▼]

In office environments, workers spend the majority of their workday sitting in a static position behind a desk or around a meeting table. Prolonged sitting time and sedentary behavior have severe negative health effects. Through this explorative study, we studied how different postures can be stimulated during meetings. We designed PositionPeak: three pieces of furniture aimed at composing a 'dynamic meeting room', subtly encouraging participants to avoid static postures. We video-recorded 5 meetings (N=16) and coded the number of position changes per participant. Participants also filled out a pre- and post-questionnaire about their experience. Our findings show that PositionPeak triggers people to adopt a variety of postures. Participants on average experienced a more efficient meeting but reported physical discomfort with some objects. We discuss the influence of PositionPeak on the meetings' social dynamics, the acceptance of new conventions and design recommendations for new meeting facilities. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: Reading a critical design for sedentary behavior in the office context
Damen, Ida; Menheere, Daphne; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office ... [more ▼]

In this paper, we present and discuss Ivy, a critical artifact offering a novel design perspective on interventions that aim to reduce sedentary behavior in office workers. Ivy is an interactive office chair that represents the amount of sitting time through growing ivy strands. Using the matrix of common argument types by Bardzell et al., we propose a structured "reading" of Ivy, as an example supporting reasoned and accessible conversations about criticality in design. Our reading of Ivy emphasized that its criticality emerges mainly from data physicalization as a new form of interactivity intended to trigger reflectiveness. The insights of this design study contribute towards a critical perspective on designing interventions to reduce sedentary time and spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailIvy: A qualitative interface to reduce sedentary behavior in the office context
Menheere, Daphne; Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a ... [more ▼]

This paper describes Ivy, an office chair that represents sitting time of an office worker through growing ivy strands. The longer one sits, the more strands will grow onto the chair. By means of a qualitative interface called Ivy, we illustrate a design approach that is currently underrepresented in sedentary behavior interventions. With this approach, we counter the current trend of digitalization and quantification of health interventions. Instead of graphs and numbers, Ivy uses data physicalization as a qualitative interface that represents sitting. We describe the design, the process, and future research steps of Ivy as a critical perspective on sedentary behavior interventions. We aim to spark discussion amongst designers and researchers in the field of Human-Computer Interaction to use qualitative interfaces as a promising approach to deepen the user's relationship with the targeted behavior and enrich the ability to construct meaning from the feedback. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailThe hub: Facilitating walking meetings through a network of interactive devices
Damen, Ida; Kok, Anika; Vink, Bas et al

in DIS 2020 Companion - Companion Publication of the 2020 ACM Designing Interactive Systems Conference (2020)

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the ... [more ▼]

Walking meetings are a promising means to improve healthy behavior at work. By providing a physically active way of working, walking meetings can reduce our sitting time. Several obstacles that limit the social acceptance and wider adoption of walking meeting practice have been highlighted in previous research. Amongst these, the difficulty to take notes or present files is a recurring concern for office workers. To address these barriers, we designed the Hub, a network of stand-up meeting stations that accommodate different work-related tasks during walking meetings. We report on two pilot user tests investigating users' experiences and ideas for improvement, and present future research steps. We discuss the usefulness and relevance of the Hub concept to overcome the obstacles associated with walking meetings. © 2020 Owner/Author. [less ▲]

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See detailA Scoping Review of Digital Tools to Reduce Physical Inactivity in Knowledge Workers
Damen, Ida; Brombacher, Hans; Lallemand, Carine UL et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020), 17(2),

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See detailUnderstanding Walking Meetings: Drivers and Barriers
Damen, Ida; Lallemand, Carine UL; Brankaert, Rens et al

Scientific Conference (2020)

There is increased interest in reducing sedentary behavior of office workers to combat the negative health effects of prolonged sitting. Walking meetings offer a promising solution to this problem as they ... [more ▼]

There is increased interest in reducing sedentary behavior of office workers to combat the negative health effects of prolonged sitting. Walking meetings offer a promising solution to this problem as they facilitate a physically active way of working. To inform future development of technologies supporting these type of meetings, in-depth qualitative insights into people’s experiences of walking meetings are needed. We conducted semi-structured walking interviews (N=16) to identify key drivers and barriers for walking meetings in a living lab setting by using the ‘WorkWalk’. The ‘WorkWalk’ is a 1.8 km walking route indicated by a dotted blue line with outdoor meeting points, integrated into the room booking system. Our findings provide insights into how walking meetings are experienced and affect the set-up and social dynamics of meetings. We propose design recommendations for the development of future technologies and service design elements to support walking meetings and active ways of working. [less ▲]

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