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See detailThe Effect of Rating Scale on Response Style: Experimental Evidence for Job Satisfaction
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Corrado, Luisa

in Journal of Well-Being Assessment (2020)

This paper explores the relationship between rating scales and response style using experimental data from a sample of 1500 households of the Innovation Panel (2008) which is part of the Understanding ... [more ▼]

This paper explores the relationship between rating scales and response style using experimental data from a sample of 1500 households of the Innovation Panel (2008) which is part of the Understanding Society database. Two random groups of individuals are being asked about their level of job satisfaction using a self-assessment questionnaire through two (7 and 11 points) rating options. By comparing the two groups, we explore the effects of the different rating scales on Extreme Response Style (ERS). The experimental design of the data enables us to show that both high and low Extreme Response Style (ERS) are correlated with personal and demographic characteristics. In addition, when comparing the shorter to a longer scale, we show that the survey design may generates tendency to choose responses at the extreme values of the distribution. [less ▲]

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See detailBody mass index and social interactions from adolescence to adulthood
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Corrado, Luisa; Distante, Roberta

in Spatial Economic Analysis (2019)

A dynamic linear-in-means model is applied in order to analyse the importance of social ties for the body weight-related behaviour of US youth. The methodology shows how to estimate peer effects free of ... [more ▼]

A dynamic linear-in-means model is applied in order to analyse the importance of social ties for the body weight-related behaviour of US youth. The methodology shows how to estimate peer effects free of the ‘reflection problem’ in a dynamic context where individual and group-specific unobservable effects are controlled for. The results show that the main drivers for the body weight-related behaviour are past and peer effects. For individuals who were normal weight or obese during adolescence, past and peer effects are shown to be both relevant. Peer effects, instead, explain more the variation in the body mass index (BMI) for individuals who were overweight during adolescence, showing in this way the importance of social interactions for body weight-related behaviour. [less ▲]

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See detailBody Mass Index and Social Interactions from Adolescence to Adulthood
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Corrado, Luisa; Distante, Roberta

Scientific Conference (2018, July)

This paper proposes a novel approach to address identi fication of social endogenous e ects by generalizing the methods commonly used in standard dynamic panel data analysis to the peer e ffects setting ... [more ▼]

This paper proposes a novel approach to address identi fication of social endogenous e ects by generalizing the methods commonly used in standard dynamic panel data analysis to the peer e ffects setting. Our methodology shows to can estimate peer e ects free of the \re "reflection problem" in a dynamic context where individual- and group-specifi c unobservable e ects are controlled for. We apply a dynamic linear-in-means model for analyzing the importance of social ties for the body-weight-related behavior of US youth. We show that the main drivers of body-weight-related behavior are habituation and imitation eff ects. For individuals who were normal-weight during adolescence habits seem to be slightly enforced by imitative behavior: in this instance, for an 1% increase in average BMI we expect about 0:6% increase in individual BMI, whereas the coe cient for past BMI is 0:4%. Imitation e ffects, instead, explain most of the variation in the Body Mass Index of individuals who were overweight and obese during adolescence, signaling the presence of a social multiplier e ffect: for these two groups an increase of 1% in average BMI leads, respectively, to an increase of 0:2% and 0:4% in current BMI. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Effect of Survey Design on Extreme Response Style: Rating Job Satisfaction
Joxhe, Majlinda UL; Corrado, Luisa

E-print/Working paper (2016)

This paper explores the relationship between survey rating scale and Extreme Response Style (ERS) using experimental data from Understanding Society (Innovation Panel 2008), where a self-assessment ... [more ▼]

This paper explores the relationship between survey rating scale and Extreme Response Style (ERS) using experimental data from Understanding Society (Innovation Panel 2008), where a self-assessment questionnaire measuring job satisfaction uses two alternative (7 and 11 points) rating options. Our results suggests that when shifting from a shorter to a longer scale, the survey design generates a tendency to choose response scales at the extreme of the distribution, thus creating a misleading quantification of the variable of interest. The experimental design of the data enables us to test our hypothesis using a non-linear estimation approach where age, gender and education level are shown to affect ERS. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 137 (10 UL)