References of "Chung, Sun Ju"
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See detailNeuroChip, an updated version of the NeuroX genotyping platform to rapidly screen for variants associated with neurological diseases
Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Faghri, Faraz; Pihlstrom, Lasse et al

in Neurobiology of Aging (2017)

Genetics has proven to be a powerful approach in neurodegenerative diseases research, resulting in the identification of numerous causal and risk variants. Previously, we introduced the NeuroX Illumina ... [more ▼]

Genetics has proven to be a powerful approach in neurodegenerative diseases research, resulting in the identification of numerous causal and risk variants. Previously, we introduced the NeuroX Illumina genotyping array, a fast and efficient genotyping platform designed for the investigation of genetic variation in neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we present its updated version, named NeuroChip. The NeuroChip is a low cost, custom-designed array containing a tagging variant backbone of about 306,670 variants complemented with a manually curated custom content comprised of 179,467 variants implicated in diverse neurological diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lewy body dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and multiple system atrophy. The tagging backbone was chosen because of the low cost and good genome-wide resolution; the custom content can be combined with other backbones, like population or drug development arrays. Using the NeuroChip, we can accurately identify rare variants and impute over 5.3 million common SNPs from the latest release of the Haplotype Reference Consortium. In summary, we describe the design and usage of the NeuroChip array, and show its capability for detecting rare pathogenic variants in numerous neurodegenerative diseases. The NeuroChip has a more comprehensive and improved content, which makes it a reliable, high-throughput, cost-effective screening tool for genetic research and molecular diagnostics in neurodegenerative diseases. [less ▲]

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See detailEvaluation of the interaction between LRRK2 and PARK16 loci in determining risk of Parkinson's disease: analysis of a large multicenter study.
Wang, Lisa; Heckman, Michael G.; Aasly, Jan O. et al

in Neurobiology of aging (2017), 49

A recent study MacLeod et al. has shown that an interaction between variants at the LRRK2 and PARK16 loci influences risk of development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our study examines the proposed ... [more ▼]

A recent study MacLeod et al. has shown that an interaction between variants at the LRRK2 and PARK16 loci influences risk of development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our study examines the proposed interaction between LRRK2 and PARK16 variants in modifying PD risk using a large multicenter series of PD patients (7715) and controls (8261) from sites participating in the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium. Our data does not support a strong direct interaction between LRRK2 and PARK16 variants; however, given the role of retromer and lysosomal pathways in PD, further studies are warranted. [less ▲]

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See detailAlpha-synuclein repeat variants and survival in Parkinson's disease.
Chung, Sun Ju; Biernacka, Joanna M.; Armasu, Sebastian M. et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2014)

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether alpha-synuclein dinucleotide repeat (REP1) genotypes are associated with survival in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: Investigators from the Genetic Epidemiology of ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether alpha-synuclein dinucleotide repeat (REP1) genotypes are associated with survival in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: Investigators from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium provided REP1 genotypes and baseline and follow-up clinical data for cases. The primary outcome was time to death. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association of REP1 genotypes with survival. RESULTS: Twenty-one sites contributed data for 6,154 cases. There was no significant association between alpha-synuclein REP1 genotypes and survival in PD. However, there was a significant association between REP1 genotypes and age at onset of PD (hazard ratio: 1.06; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.10; P value = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In our large consortium study, alpha-synuclein REP1 genotypes were not associated with survival in PD. Further studies of alpha-synuclein's role in disease progression and long-term outcomes are needed. (c) 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. [less ▲]

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See detailGlobal investigation and meta-analysis of the C9orf72 (G4C2)n repeat in Parkinson disease.
Theuns, Jessie; Verstraeten, Aline; Sleegers, Kristel et al

in Neurology (2014)

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to clarify the role of (G4C2)n expansions in the etiology of Parkinson disease (PD) in the worldwide multicenter Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease (GEO ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study is to clarify the role of (G4C2)n expansions in the etiology of Parkinson disease (PD) in the worldwide multicenter Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease (GEO-PD) cohort. METHODS: C9orf72 (G4C2)n repeats were assessed in a GEO-PD cohort of 7,494 patients diagnosed with PD and 5,886 neurologically healthy control individuals ascertained in Europe, Asia, North America, and Australia. RESULTS: A pathogenic (G4C2)n>60 expansion was detected in only 4 patients with PD (4/7,232; 0.055%), all with a positive family history of neurodegenerative dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or atypical parkinsonism, while no carriers were detected with typical sporadic or familial PD. Meta-analysis revealed a small increase in risk of PD with an increasing number of (G4C2)n repeats; however, we could not detect a robust association between the C9orf72 (G4C2)n repeat and PD, and the population attributable risk was low. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these findings indicate that expansions in C9orf72 do not have a major role in the pathogenesis of PD. Testing for C9orf72 repeat expansions should only be considered in patients with PD who have overt symptoms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or apparent family history of neurodegenerative dementia or motor neuron disease. [less ▲]

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