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See detailInequality of educational opportunity differentially impacts women’s and men’s later-life cognitive performance
Leist, Anja UL; Bar-Haim; Chauvel, Louis UL

Scientific Conference (2021, June)

Find the published paper here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ssmph.2021.100837

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See detailCross-border mobility in European countries: associations between cross-border worker status and health outcomes
Nonnenmacher, Lucas UL; Baumann, Michèle UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL et al

in BMC Public Health (2021)

Mobility of workers living in one country and working in a different country has increased in the European Union. Exposed to commuting factors, cross-border workers (CBWs) constitute a potential high-risk ... [more ▼]

Mobility of workers living in one country and working in a different country has increased in the European Union. Exposed to commuting factors, cross-border workers (CBWs) constitute a potential high-risk population. But the relationships between health and commuting abroad are under-documented. Our aims were to: (1) measure the prevalence of the perceived health status and the physical health outcomes (activity limitation, chronic diseases, disability and no leisure activities), (2) analyse their associations with commuting status as well as (3) with income and health index among CBWs. Based on the ‘Enquête Emploi’, the French cross-sectional survey segment of the European Labour Force Survey (EU LFS), the population was composed of 2,546,802 workers. Inclusion criteria for the samples were aged between 20 and 60 years and living in the French cross-border departments of Germany, Belgium, Switzerland and Luxembourg. The Health Index is an additional measure obtained with five health variables. A logistic model was used to estimate the odds ratios of each group of CBWs, taking non-cross border workers (NCBWs) as the reference group, controlling by demographic background and labour status variables. A sample of 22,828 observations (2456 CBWs vs. 20,372 NCBWs) was retained. The CBW status is negatively associated with chronic diseases and disability. A marginal improvement of the health index is correlated with a wage premium for both NCBWs and CBWs. Commuters to Luxembourg have the best health outcomes, whereas commuters to Germany the worst. CBWs are healthier and have more income. Interpretations suggest (1) a healthy cross-border phenomenon steming from a social selection and a positive association between income and the health index is confirmed; (2) the existence of major health disparities among CBWs; and (3) the rejection of the spillover phenomenon assumption for CBWs. The newly founded European Labour Authority (ELA) should take into account health policies as a promising way to support the cross-border mobility within the European Union. [less ▲]

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See detailRewealthization in twenty-first century Western countries: the defining trend of the socioeconomic squeeze of the middle class
Chauvel, Louis UL; Bar Haim, Eyal; Hartung, Anne et al

in Journal of Chinese Sociology (2021), 8

The wealth-to-income ratio (WIR) in many Western countries, particularly in Europe and North America, increased by a factor of two in the last three decades. This represents a defining empirical trend: a ... [more ▼]

The wealth-to-income ratio (WIR) in many Western countries, particularly in Europe and North America, increased by a factor of two in the last three decades. This represents a defining empirical trend: a rewealthization (from the French repatrimonialisation)—or the comeback of (inherited) wealth primacy since the mid-1990s. For the sociology of social stratification, “occupational classes” based on jobs worked must now be understood within a context of wealth-based domination. This paper first illustrates important empirical features of an era of rising WIR. We then outline the theory of rewealthization as a major factor of class transformations in relation to regimes stabilized in the post-WWII industrial area. Compared to the period where wealth became secondary to education and earnings for middle-class lifestyles, rewealthization steepens society's vertical structure; the "olive-shaped" Western society is replaced by a new one where wealth "abundance" at the top masks social reproduction and frustrations below. [less ▲]

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See detailProcessus de civilisation, inégalités extrêmes et violence de masse
Chauvel, Louis UL

in Scheidel, Walter (Ed.) UNE HISTOIRE DES INÉGALITÉS : DE L’ÂGE DE PIERRE AU XXIe SIÈCLE (2021)

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See detailSocioeconomic and behavioural factors associated with access to and use of Personal Health Records
Paccoud, Ivana UL; Baumann, Michèle UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL et al

in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making (2021), 21

Background: Access to and use of digital technology are more common among people of higher socioeconomic status. These differences might be due to lack of interest, not having physical access or having ... [more ▼]

Background: Access to and use of digital technology are more common among people of higher socioeconomic status. These differences might be due to lack of interest, not having physical access or having lower intentions to use this technology. By integrating the digital divide approach and the User Acceptance of Information Technology (UTAUT) model, this study aims to further our understanding of socioeconomic factors and the mechanisms linked to different stages in the use of Personal Health Records (PHR): desire, intentions and physical access to PHR. Methods: A cross-sectional online and in-person survey was undertaken in the areas of Lorraine (France), Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Saarland (Germany), and Wallonia (Belgium). Exploratory factor analysis was performed to group items derived from the UTAUT model. We applied linear and logistic regressions controlling for country-level heterogeneity, health and demographic factors. Results: A total of 829 individuals aged over 18 completed the questionnaire. Socioeconomic inequalities were present in the access to and use of PHR. Education and income played a significant role in individuals' desire to access their PHR. Being older than 65 years, and migrant, were negatively associated with desire to access PHR. An income gradient was found in having a physical access to PHR, while for the subgroup of respondents who expressed desire to have access, higher educational level was positively associated with intentions to regularly use PHR. In fully adjusted model testing the contribution of UTAUT-derived factors, individuals who perceived PHRs to be useful and had the necessary digital skills were more inclined to use their PHR regularly. Social influence, support and lack of anxiety in using technology were strong predictors of regular PHR use. Conclusion: The findings highlight the importance of considering all stages in PHR use: desire to access, physical access and intention to regularly use PHRs, while paying special attention to migrants and people with lower socioeconomic backgrounds who may feel financial constraints and are not able to exploit the potential of PHRs. As PHR use is expected to come with health benefits, facilitating access and regular use for those less inclined could reduce health inequalities and advance health equity. [less ▲]

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See detailDetecting the ‘Black Hole’ of age-period excess mortality in 25 countries: Age-period-cohort residual analysis
Chauvel, Louis UL; Leist, Anja UL; Smith, Herbert L.

in Bell, Andrew (Ed.) Age, Period, and Cohort Effects (2021)

In a time of worldwide availability of annual age-specific mortality data, we lack basic tools for detecting and graphing, from a comparative perspective, fine-grained deviations from mortality trends. We ... [more ▼]

In a time of worldwide availability of annual age-specific mortality data, we lack basic tools for detecting and graphing, from a comparative perspective, fine-grained deviations from mortality trends. We provide a new age-period-cohort-based methodology, combining information from age-period (AP) and APC-Detrended (APCD) analyses to detect all-cause mortality increases. Plotting the resulting AP coefficients and APCD residuals in equilateral Lexis diagrams, mortality patterns can easily be distinguished as age, period, or cohort trends and fluctuations. We highlight abnormalities as interactions of age and period (‘Black Holes’). We then investigate the ‘Black Holes’ of mortality of young-adult cohorts in the early 1990s in Spain, other southern European countries, and the U.S., in emphasizing their simultaneously occurring mortality crises. Additional analyses with WHO mortality data and epidemiological evidence from other studies show that these mortality increases likely result from lack of treatment and inadequate public health responses to the beginnings of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. We discuss other possible applications of the new method. [less ▲]

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See detailInequality of educational opportunity at time of schooling predicts cognitive functioning in later adulthood
Leist, Anja UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal; Chauvel, Louis UL

in SSM - Population Health (2021), 15

Objectives. Our understanding of how societal conditions and educational policies influence cognitive development across the life course is improving. We tested the extent to which inequality of ... [more ▼]

Objectives. Our understanding of how societal conditions and educational policies influence cognitive development across the life course is improving. We tested the extent to which inequality of educational opportunity (IEO), the country- and cohort-specific correlation of parents' and their offspring's length of schooling, offers systematically different opportunities to contribute to cognitive development, which in turn influences cognitive abilities up to older ages. Methods. A total of 46,972 individuals of three cohorts born 1940–63 from 16 European countries and Israel provided up to six cognitive assessments and information on covariates in the SHARE survey 2004–2017. Individual-level data were linked to indicators of IEO at time of schooling, and economic, health, and human development, provided by World Bank, WHO, and the UN. Results. In multilevel (mixed-effects) models with random individual and country-cohort effects and adjusted for a large set of confounders, higher IEO was associated with lower levels of cognitive functioning in men and women. Interaction analyses suggested lower cognitive levels particularly of women who were schooled in higher IEO contexts and had lower educational attainment. Associations with rate of change in cognitive functioning were present only in women, however there was little clinically relevant cognitive decline across the window of observation. Result patterns were mostly consistent after including additional contextual indicators, and in a subsample with childhood information. Discussion. Findings suggest that IEO is able to substantially influence cognitive development with long-lasting impacts. Lower-educated women of the cohorts under investigation may have been particularly vulnerable to high-inequality educational contexts. [less ▲]

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See detailThe patients’ perspective on access to and use of Personal Health Records
Paccoud, Ivana UL; Baumann, Michèle UL; Le Bihan, Etienne UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, October 29)

We present the patients' perspective regarding the use of Personal Health Records, and give insights on patients' characteristics, such as socioeconomic and behavioural factors, that are associated with ... [more ▼]

We present the patients' perspective regarding the use of Personal Health Records, and give insights on patients' characteristics, such as socioeconomic and behavioural factors, that are associated with the access to and use of Personal Health Records. The findings come from the INTERREG APPS project that investigated preferences for and intention to use Personal Health Records in four cross-border regions, in Lorraine/France, Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Saarland/Germany, and Wallonia/Belgium. [less ▲]

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See detailOrienter les soins vers le patient partenaire. Un livre blanc pour la Grande Région
Pétré Benoit, Consortium APPS Lux; Baumann, Michèle UL; Chauvel, Louis UL et al

Book published by INTERREG APPS (2020)

Les différents chapitres de ce livre proposent une approche holistique pour faire évoluer le système de santé vers le partenariat de soins. Résultat de trois années de recherche et de concertation, le ... [more ▼]

Les différents chapitres de ce livre proposent une approche holistique pour faire évoluer le système de santé vers le partenariat de soins. Résultat de trois années de recherche et de concertation, le Livre Blanc s’appuie sur des recherches documentaires (analyse de la littérature scientifique et de la législation spécifique de chaque pays), des entretiens et des enquêtes auprès de nombreux acteurs, le repérage et l’analyse d’initiatives en GR et la discussion orientée vers le consensus. Par ailleurs, les propositions de recommandations ont été élaborées et discutées lors d’un séminaire interrégional réalisé en décembre 2019. Le Livre Blanc est structuré en 5 parties qui s’adressent chacune à un public ciblé. La première partie situe le contexte dans lequel s’est réalisé le projet et décrit la méthodologie du programme. La seconde partie est consacrée aux aspects réglementaires de l’approche patient partenaire et à leurs conséquences sur les pratiques et les initiatives analysées sur le terrain. Elle est destinée de manière privilégiée aux mandataires politiques. La troisième partie propose une réflexion sur le développement de stratégies de partenariat au niveau des institutions de santé. Elle concerne les gestionnaires des établissements de santé. La quatrième partie vise à amener les professionnels à s’interroger sur ce que le partenariat de soins peut leur apporter dans leurs pratiques de soins. Elle s’adresse, en particulier, aux acteurs en contact direct avec les patients. La cinquième et dernière partie suggère différentes voies possibles de développement de l’APPS dans les domaines de l’enseignement et de la recherche. Toutes ces parties s’adressent bien évidemment au patient, qui est au coeur de l’APPS. Les prises de position proposées par ce Livre Blanc s’appuient sur les données collectées par le consortium de recherche de 2017 à 2020. Dès lors, ce document ne peut être exhaustif et est appelé à évoluer, basé davantage sur une fonction vectrice de normes que de règles. Pour davantage d’information et pour connaitre nos activités et nos publications, rendezvous sur le site web du projet APPS (https://www.patientpartner.org/). [less ▲]

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See detailCore Values that Influence the Patient—Healthcare Professional Power Dynamic: Steering Interaction towards Partnership
Odero, Angela UL; Pongy, Manon UL; Chauvel, Louis UL et al

in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2020), 7(8458),

Healthcare has long been marked by the authoritative-physician–passive-patient interaction, with patients seeking help and physicians seeking to restore patients back to health. However, lobalisation ... [more ▼]

Healthcare has long been marked by the authoritative-physician–passive-patient interaction, with patients seeking help and physicians seeking to restore patients back to health. However, lobalisation, social movements, and technological advancements are transforming the nature of this relationship. We aim to identify core values that influence the power dynamic betweenpatients and healthcare professionals, and determine how to steer these interactions towards partnership, a more suitable approach to current healthcare needs. Patients with physical chronic diseases (10 men, 18 women) and healthcare professionals (11 men, 12 women) were interviewed, sessions transcribed, and the framework method used to thematically analyse the data. Validation was done through analyst triangulation and member check recheck. Core values identified as influencing the patient-healthcare professional power dynamic include: (A) values that empower patients (acceptance of diagnosis and autonomy); (B) values unique to healthcare professionals (HCPs) (acknowledging patients experiential knowledge and including patients in the therapeutic process); and (C) shared capitals related to their interactions (communication, information sharing and exchange, collaboration, and mutual commitment). These interdependent core values can be considered prerequisites to the implementation of the patient-as-partner approach in healthcare. Partnership would imply a paradigm shift such that stakeholders systematically examine each other’s perspective, motivations, capabilities, and goals, and then adapt their interactions in this accord, for optimal outcome. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Western Middle Classes under Stress: Welfare State Retrenchments, Globalization, and Declining Returns to Education
Chauvel, Louis UL

in Mir Rossii (2020), 29(4), 85-111

Following the work of Pierre Bourdieu and Gustav Schmoller before him, the multipolarity of the middle classes between higher and lower, and between cultural and economic capitals is well acknowledged ... [more ▼]

Following the work of Pierre Bourdieu and Gustav Schmoller before him, the multipolarity of the middle classes between higher and lower, and between cultural and economic capitals is well acknowledged. This old vision is useful to understand the “middle classes adrift” of the last 20 years in France and Continental Europe. The expansion of the “new wage earner middle class” of the 1960s to 1990s is now an old dream of the welfare state expansion of Western societies, and the European social structure now faces a trend of “repatrimonialization”, meaning a U-turn towards a decline in the value of mid-qualified work and an expansion of the return to the inheritance of family assets. This paper addresses three main points. First, a new description of repatrimonialization is useful in the specific European context of middle-class societies. We need a redefinition of the system of middle classes (plural) in the context of the construction and decline of strong welfare states. Second, there are three ruptures in the social trends of the ‘wage earner society’ of the 1960s to 1990s. In this period, economic growth, social homogenization and social protection were major contextual elements of the expansion of ‘the new middle class,’ based on educational meritocracy, the valorization of credentialed skills, and the expansion of the average wage compared to housing and capital assets (‘depatrimonialization’). After the 1990s, the rupture and reversal of these trends, with ‘stagnation’, ‘new inequalities’ and ‘social uncertainty’ as new trends, generated a backlash in the “middle class society”. Third, I analyze the demographic and social consequences of these new trends in terms of the shrinking of the middle classes in a context where the inheritance of assets and resources changed the previous equilibrium. Finally, I highlight the importance of addressing the problem of social stability when large strata of the middle class have less interest in the maintenance of the social order. [less ▲]

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See detailLife Satisfaction and mobility: Their associations with career attitudes, and health-related factors among postgraduates having studied in universities intra EU and outside EU
Odero, Angela UL; Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL et al

in BMC Public Health (2020), 20(3),

Background. University postgraduates’ mobility towards, and outside the EU is continuously increasing, creating a competitive context in which maintaining a high life satisfaction (LS) is a public health ... [more ▼]

Background. University postgraduates’ mobility towards, and outside the EU is continuously increasing, creating a competitive context in which maintaining a high life satisfaction (LS) is a public health challenge. However, the relationship between LS and its determinants among this population are under-documented. Our aims were to measure LS indicators of mobile postgraduates (Intra EU: Who pursue part of their studies in Europe; Outside EU: Who study outside of Europe) versus non-mobile (pursue their studies in Luxembourg), and to analyze the associations between LS and career attitudes, socioeconomic characteristics, and health-related factors for each group. Method. Six hundred and sixty-four (644) students obtained financial aid from the Luxembourgish government independent of their family’s socioeconomic situation. Contacted by post, they completed an online questionnaire. Analyses included a multiple linear regression model in which only significant relationships (p < 0.05) were used. Results.Three groups were created: Mobile intra EU (n = 381), mobile outside EU (n = 43) and non-mobile (n = 66) postgraduates. Health satisfaction was positively linked to LS, in all groups. Among the mobile outside EU group, majority (63.2%) were men and 57.9% did not live alone - health was the only determinant which contributed to their LS. Among the mobile intra EU, majority (57.8%) were women, and 64.3% not living alone. Autonomy and career adaptability attitudes were positively associated with their LS (b: 0.210 and 0.119, respectively), whereas the worry factor was negatively (b: − 0.153 and -0.159) associated. The non-mobile, were the oldest of the three groups. Majority (51.6%) were women, and 93.7% did not live alone. Career optimism and planning attitudes were positively correlated to their LS (regression parameter estimates (b: 0.400 and 0.212, respectively). Conclusions.Attention should be devoted to the LS of local and cosmopolitan students, as it seems to be a relevant health indicator. Overall, the farther the mobility was, the higher the postgraduates’ general LS (8.5/10) was; this indicator was higher than the LS indicator for the age group 25–34 years 7.53/10 (EU-28, in 2013). University’ services could promote the development of career projects and the promotion of health to enhance postgraduates’ LS. University policy makers need to ensure this for all students. [less ▲]

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See detailIncome Inequality and the Strength of the Origins-Health Gradient in 20 European Countries
Chauvel, Louis UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Leist, Anja UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 12)

Health is determined by socio-economic position not only of the individual, but also by that of their parents. The intergenerational transmission of health via parental socioeconomic status is suggested ... [more ▼]

Health is determined by socio-economic position not only of the individual, but also by that of their parents. The intergenerational transmission of health via parental socioeconomic status is suggested to vary according to contextual factors such as income inequality. Earlier studies with a comparative perspective had a limited number of countries available. This study uses 20 countries at up to five waves from the European Social Survey (2008-2016) and SWIID in order to examine the extent to which income inequality is related to the origins-health gradient. The higher the income inequality of a given country and year, the stronger the origins-health gradient. Contrary to earlier findings, this association can be fully explained by intergenerational transmission of status, i.e. education. Implications of this finding are that health is largely determined by educational attainment and associated health behaviors, giving societal context a less prominent role than earlier studies suggested. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational mobility in Europe: Home ownership as a facet of social reproduction?
Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL

Scientific Conference (2019, March)

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See detailIncome and Wealth Above the Median: New Measurements and Results for Europe and the United States
Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL; Bar-Haim, Eyal et al

in Decancq, Koen; van Kerm, Philippe (Eds.) What Drives Inequality (2019)

The study of the upper tail of the income and wealth distributions is important to the understanding of economic inequality. By means of the ‘isograph’, a new tool to describe income or wealth ... [more ▼]

The study of the upper tail of the income and wealth distributions is important to the understanding of economic inequality. By means of the ‘isograph’, a new tool to describe income or wealth distributions, the authors compare wealth and income and wealth-to-income ratios in 16 European countries and the United States using data for years 2013/2014 from the Eurozone Household Finance and Consumption Survey and the US Survey on Consumer Finance. Focussing on the top half of the distribution, the authors find that for households in the top income quintile, wealth-to-income ratios generally increase rapidly with income; the association between high wealth and high incomes is highest among the highest percentiles. There is generally a positive relationship between median wealth in the country and the wealth of the top 1%. However, the United States is an outlier where the median wealth is relatively low but the wealth of the top 1% is extremely high. [less ▲]

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See detailDYNAMICS OF INDIVIDUAL INCOME RANK VOLATILITY: EVIDENCE FROM WEST GERMANY AND THE US
Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL; Palmisano, Flaviana

in B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy (2019)

This paper presents a methodology for comparing income rank volatility profiles over time and across distributions. While most of the existing measures are affected by changes in marginal distributions ... [more ▼]

This paper presents a methodology for comparing income rank volatility profiles over time and across distributions. While most of the existing measures are affected by changes in marginal distributions, this paper proposes a framework that is based on individuals’ relative positions in the distribution, and is neutral in relation to structural changes that occur in the economy. Applying this approach to investigate rank volatility in Germany and the US over three decades, we show that while poorer individuals within both countries are the most volatile, the volatility trend for the middle class in each of these countries differs. [less ▲]

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See detailMore Necessary and Less Sufficient: An Age-Period-Cohort Approach to Overeducation in Comparative Perspective
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL

in Higher Education (2019)

In many countries, the skilled labor market has lagged educational expansion. As a result of increased competition, younger cohorts of the highly educated face decreasing returns to education or ... [more ▼]

In many countries, the skilled labor market has lagged educational expansion. As a result of increased competition, younger cohorts of the highly educated face decreasing returns to education or overeducation. Surprisingly, decreasing occupational outcomes do not coincide empirically with the economic returns among those with tertiary education. Regarding the process of changes in economic returns to education based on cohort transformations, we expect that the expansion of tertiary education affects specific cohorts, which find themselves facing more labor market competition. As a result, the economic returns to education should decrease among younger cohorts even when the overall returns to education remain stable over time. To study this process, we model economic returns with a new age-period-cohort-trended lag (APCTLAG) method, which allows us to compare the gap in economic returns between tertiary and less than tertiary education over cohorts. Using the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS), we analyze trends over three decades in 12 countries. Our results confirm that educational returns for tertiary education have declined over time, even though the gap between the educated and the less educated has remained similar in most of the countries. For younger cohorts, tertiary education has become more necessary to survive in the competitive labor market, but the actual economic returns have decreased—making tertiary education less sufficient than before. [less ▲]

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See detailA cohort perspective on intergenerational mobility and inequality
Bar-Haim, Eyal UL; Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL

in Long-term consequences of the Great Recession for stratification, mobility and inequality. Abstracts booklet. (2019)

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See detailEconomic inequality and intergenerational socioeconomic persistence: A European test of the Great Gatsby Curve hypothesis
Chauvel, Louis UL; Hartung, Anne UL

in Long-term consequences of the Great Recession for stratification, mobility and inequality. Abstracts booklet. (2019)

Detailed reference viewed: 191 (6 UL)