References of "Caruso, Geoffrey 50001199"
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See detailFiefs des comtes de Luxembourg au 13e siècle (Grande Région SaarLorLux)
Moulin, Philippe; Helfer, Malte UL; Pauly, Michel UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2022)

This map is an attempt at a cartographic representation of the active fiefs of the Counts of Luxembourg between 1200 and 1310. The map is intended to visualise the presence, frequency and type of feudal ... [more ▼]

This map is an attempt at a cartographic representation of the active fiefs of the Counts of Luxembourg between 1200 and 1310. The map is intended to visualise the presence, frequency and type of feudal estates of the Counts of Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailRadial analysis and scaling of urban land use
Lemoy, Rémi UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Scientific Reports (2021), (22044),

We determine the functional form and scaling law of radial artificial land use profiles in 300 European functional urban areas (FUAs). These profiles, starting from a fully artificial surface in the city ... [more ▼]

We determine the functional form and scaling law of radial artificial land use profiles in 300 European functional urban areas (FUAs). These profiles, starting from a fully artificial surface in the city center, decrease exponentially, the faster the smaller the city. More precisely, the characteristic decrease distance scales like the square root of total population, meaning that the artificial surface of cities is proportional to their population. This also means that the amount of artificial land per capita is independent of city size, and that larger cities are not more or less parsimonious in terms of land use than smaller ones. [less ▲]

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See detailCentrality and city size effects on NO2 ground and tropospheric concentrations within European cities
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, November 05)

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (7 UL)
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See detailScaling of urban heat island and NO2 with urban population: A meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, June 29)

Detailed reference viewed: 95 (8 UL)
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See detailScaling of urban heat island and nitrogen dioxide with urban population: a meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, June 10)

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (15 UL)
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See detailScaling of urban heat island & NO2 with urban population: a meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2021, May 28)

Detailed reference viewed: 225 (17 UL)
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See detailLes pratiques du quotidien transfrontalières dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Wille, Christian UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Helfer, Malte UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2021)

This contribution deals with the daily cross-border practices of the inhabitants of Saarland, Lorraine, Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Wallonia. It will deal with various aspects of unquestioned ... [more ▼]

This contribution deals with the daily cross-border practices of the inhabitants of Saarland, Lorraine, Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate and Wallonia. It will deal with various aspects of unquestioned activities that are regularly carried out in a country other than the country of residence. The dimension of regular physical mobility in a transnational perspective will have to be integrated into this analysis insofar as cross-border everyday practices represent routine activities associated with a circular (pendular) movement that extends beyond neighbouring national territories. From this point of view, it should be emphasised that the Greater Region SaarLorLux is already experiencing pronounced cross-border mobility phenomena: mobility in the context of employment and in the context of residential migration. [less ▲]

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See detailLehen der Grafen von Luxemburg im 13. Jahrhundert (Großregion SaarLorLux)
Moulin, Philippe; Pauly, Michel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2021)

The map "The fiefs of the counts of Luxembourg in the 13th century" represents an attempt at a cartographic visualisation of the active fiefs of the counts of Luxembourg between 1200 and 1310. The map was ... [more ▼]

The map "The fiefs of the counts of Luxembourg in the 13th century" represents an attempt at a cartographic visualisation of the active fiefs of the counts of Luxembourg between 1200 and 1310. The map was created within the framework of the Master thesis "Lehnsrecht, Lehnspolitik und Lehnshof der Grafen von Luxemburg im 13. Jahrhundert" and aims to visualise the presence, number and type of fiefs. [less ▲]

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See detailLa démographie de la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Helfer, Malte UL; Pauly, Michel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

E-print/Working paper (2021)

This article is an extract from the Report on the Economic and Social Situation of the Greater Region 2013/2014 for the Economic and Social Committee of the Greater Region (CESGR) (IBA/OIE, 2014, p.3-10 ... [more ▼]

This article is an extract from the Report on the Economic and Social Situation of the Greater Region 2013/2014 for the Economic and Social Committee of the Greater Region (CESGR) (IBA/OIE, 2014, p.3-10). The maps show the population density in the Greater Region on 1 January 2013, the population of working age on 1 January 2012 and the evolution of the total population 2000-2013 in % (Lorraine employment areas 1999-2011), calculated by the Interregional Labour Market Observatory IOE. [less ▲]

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See detailRadial Urban Forms: Lessons from Land Profile Scaling Analyses & Spatial-Explicit Models
Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2020, November 25)

We definitely live in an increasingly urban World for half of humanity now lives in cities. Cities provide wealth but also negatively impact the environment and the health of citizens. Arguably the ... [more ▼]

We definitely live in an increasingly urban World for half of humanity now lives in cities. Cities provide wealth but also negatively impact the environment and the health of citizens. Arguably the benefits and costs of cities relate to both their size, in population terms, and their internal structure, in terms of the relative spatial arrangement of built-up and natural land. Much of urban research focusses on very large cities and urban cores. Yet 3 urban human out of 4 live in cities of less than 4 million inhabitants (according to the global GHSL dataset). Similarly, 3 out of 4 in a typical (European) city do not live in its core but beyond (using a 7-8km radius to define core for a city like London or Paris). To address urban sustainability issues and design adaptation policies, these 75% certainly count and, we can argue, also deserve specific attention because of the relative proximity between urban and non-urban (natural) use that smaller cities and suburban (non-core) areas may permit. In this respect, it is key to understand how the internal structure of cities, in particular the form and density of built-up areas and the interwoven green space emerge out of the core up until the fringe. It is also key to understand whether the form of cities, especially density gradients and the share of urbanised/non-urbanised land change with city size. In this talk we draw lessons from 2 research approaches to urban forms: one theoretical that uses spatial micro-economic simulations, and one empirical that uses spatially detailed land use datasets. Our theoretical simulations relate individual behaviour to urban forms while our empirics relate urban forms to city size. Both have in common a radial perspective to cities, i.e. explicitly or implicitly assuming that the accessibility trade-off to a given centre is a key determinant of locations and land uses. In both cases, we look at urbanisation and green space structures and at pollution exposure as an example of impact. [less ▲]

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See detailScaling of urban heat island & NO2 with urban population: a meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2020, September 16)

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See detailLa construction d'églises pendant le 20e siècle dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Schelbert, Georg; Brakensiek, Stephan; Pauly, Michel UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

In the Greater Region SaarLorLux, it is estimated that around 1,000 new churches were built or old ones completely renovated during the 20th century. Strong population growth due to industrialisation, the ... [more ▼]

In the Greater Region SaarLorLux, it is estimated that around 1,000 new churches were built or old ones completely renovated during the 20th century. Strong population growth due to industrialisation, the destruction caused by the two wars and the resulting displacement of people also had an impact on church building. Developments within the Church itself also play a role in the architecture, especially the debate on the liturgy which began at the beginning of the 20th century and ended with a reform at the Second Vatican Council, and which had a greater or lesser influence in the different regions. [less ▲]

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See detailLe brassage dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Wöltering, Florian; de Assis Mendonça, Juliano; Helfer, Malte UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

In the Greater Region SaarLorLux, which consists of Lorraine, Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate, Saarland and Wallonia, the beginnings of beer date back to the Roman occupation. At first, beer was brewed ... [more ▼]

In the Greater Region SaarLorLux, which consists of Lorraine, Luxembourg, Rhineland-Palatinate, Saarland and Wallonia, the beginnings of beer date back to the Roman occupation. At first, beer was brewed mainly in monasteries. The oldest evidence of a monastic brewery is found in Lorraine, dating from 771 BC, and in Luxembourg only from around 1300. In both regions, religious institutions were the main type of brewery until the industrialization. The first evidence of a municipal brewery dates back to the 12th century; in the beginning, these breweries did not compete with the monasteries. In Wallonia, too, monastic breweries developed until the French occupation, and hence secularisation, brought the business to a halt from 1794. Today, most of the remaining breweries in the Greater Region are part of international groups. There are still a few independent breweries, such as in Rhineland-Palatinate and Saarland, where one of Germany's largest brewing groups, the Karlsberg Group, dominates the industry. In addition to these national companies, since the 1980s, microbreweries have begun to emerge with an exclusively local scope. They ensure that local brewing techniques are not lost. [less ▲]

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See detailL'offre transfrontalière en commerce de détail dans la Grande Région SaarLorLux
Devillet, Guénaël; Vazquez Parras, Juan; Jaspard, Mathieu et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

The study examines the commercial agglomerations in the inner border regions of the Greater SaarLor-Lux Region on the basis of our own surveys conducted between 2010 and 2012. It quantifies and typifies ... [more ▼]

The study examines the commercial agglomerations in the inner border regions of the Greater SaarLor-Lux Region on the basis of our own surveys conducted between 2010 and 2012. It quantifies and typifies the commercial offer according to the size and composition of shopping centres. The territory covered is made up of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and the Belgian, German and French conurbations within a 20-minute drive from the Luxembourg border. This isochrone includes the following cities and their conurbations: Trier and Bitburg in Rhineland-Palatinate, Saarbrücken in Saarland, Metz, Thionville and Longwy in Lorraine as well as Arlon and Bastogne in Wallonia. Only one nodule is located beyond this zone: the Fashion Outlet Zweibrücken in Zweibrucken. It appears in the database because of its wide reach and its ability to recruit customers as far away as Luxembourg. [less ▲]

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See detailA Spatially explicit ABM of Central Place Foraging Theory and its explanatory power for hunter-gatherers settlement patterns formation processes
Sikk, Kaarel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

in Adaptive Behavior (2020)

The behavioural ecological approach to anthropology states that the density and distribution of resources determine optimal patterns of resource use and also sets its constraints to grouping, mobility and ... [more ▼]

The behavioural ecological approach to anthropology states that the density and distribution of resources determine optimal patterns of resource use and also sets its constraints to grouping, mobility and settlement choice. Central Place Foraging (CPF) models have been used for analysing foraging behaviours of hunter-gatherers and to draw a causal link from the volume of available resources in the environment to the mobility decisions of hunter-gatherers. In this study we propose a spatially explicit agent-based CPF mode. We explore its potential for explaining formation of settlement patterns and test its robustness to the configuration of space. Building on a model assuming homogeneous energy distributions we had to add several new parameters and an adaptation mechanism for foragers to predict the length of their stay, together with a heterogeneous environment configuration. The validation of the model shows that the spatially explicit CPF is generally robust to spatial configuration of energy resources. The total volume of energy has a significant effect on constraining sedentism as predicted by aspatial model and thus can be used on different environmental conditions. Still the spatial autocorrelation of resource distribution has a linear effect on optimal mobility decisions and needs to be considered in predictive models. The effect on settlement choice is not substantial and is more determined by other characteristics of settlement location. This limits the CPF models in analysing settlement pattern formation processes. [less ▲]

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See detailScaling of urban heat island & NO2 with urban population: a meta-analysis
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2019, December 05)

Detailed reference viewed: 140 (14 UL)
See detailCentral place foraging and hunter-gatherer settlement patterns: how resource depletion influences population concentration
Sikk, Kaarel UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 09)

Settlement patterns are one of the main products of the Stone Age archaeological research. Their emergence processes can be explained by different models of settlement and mobility choices done by past ... [more ▼]

Settlement patterns are one of the main products of the Stone Age archaeological research. Their emergence processes can be explained by different models of settlement and mobility choices done by past inhabitants. In current study we explore central place foraging (CPF) model of huntergatherers as a tool for exploring formation of settlement patterns. CFP model is used for describing mobility choices of hunter-gatherer groups. It implies the groups settle at a central location and make logistic forays to surrounding areas foraging for required resources. The central location is chosen by it’s optimal position in relation to those resources and the group is willing to leave the current base location if a better alternative arises. We introduce a spatially explicit Agent-Based Model (ABM) of the CPF and explore how heterogeneous environment influences the settlement pattern formation. The motivation to move in CFP comes from changes in the environment. An important part of the change is the depletion of existing resources by the hunter-gatherers themselves. We are using the ABM model to explore how depletion process influences the dispersal of huntergatherer groups in the environment and which conditions and strategies will result in higher concentration and clustering of the population. [less ▲]

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See detailUnravelling the border-facade of France : a multi-level modelling of cross-border commuting
Pigeron-Piroth, Isabelle UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Le Texier, Marion

in Caruso, Geoffrey; Gerber, Philippe; Jones, Catherine (Eds.) et al 21st European Colloquium on Theoretical and Quantitative Geography (ECTQG), Book of Abstracts, Mondorf-las-Bains, 5-9 septembre 2019 (2019, September 09)

Given its central position in Western Europe, France is the European country where cross-border commuting is most intense. Over 350000 residents cross the national border everyday to go to work. Cross ... [more ▼]

Given its central position in Western Europe, France is the European country where cross-border commuting is most intense. Over 350000 residents cross the national border everyday to go to work. Cross-border commuting raises a lot of concerns for planners on both side of each border, especially for provisioning transport infrastructure and local public services but also because it impacts land and housing markets, especially when salary differentials are high. While there is a lot of research about the daily functioning of specific borders (e.g. France-Switzerland or France-Luxembourg), generalization is lacking and spatial heterogeneities impede our understanding of the very determinants of cross-border commuting, such as the role of benefits differentials, transport costs and distance, or the relative availability of jobs at residential places and across the border. Further, these effects are most likely mediated differently by the socio-demographic characteristics of workers, their employment sector, and the quality of their residential environment at large. This suggests that an individual approach and a spatially detailed approach is needed, which contrasts sharply with the fact that most European-wide studies of cross-border commuting are conducted at very aggregated spatial scales (NUTS 2 or 3). [less ▲]

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See detailThe potential scaling of urban heat island and nitrogen dioxide with urban population: a systematic review
Wei, Yufei UL; Caruso, Geoffrey UL; Lemoy, Rémi

Scientific Conference (2019, September 08)

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (6 UL)