References of "Brockmann, Kathrin"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailDistinct metabolomic signature in cerebrospinal fluid in early parkinson's disease: Early Parkinson'S CSF Metabolic Signature
Trezzi, Jean-Pierre UL; Galozzi, Sara; Jäger, Christian UL et al

in Movement Disorders (2017)

Objective: The purpose of this study was to profile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from early-stage PD patients for disease-related metabolic changes and to determine a robust biomarker signature for early ... [more ▼]

Objective: The purpose of this study was to profile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from early-stage PD patients for disease-related metabolic changes and to determine a robust biomarker signature for early-stage PD diagnosis. Methods: By applying a non-targeted and mass spectrometry-driven approach, we investigated the CSF metabolome of 44 early-stage sporadic PD patients yet without treatment (DeNoPa cohort). We compared all detected metabolite levels with those measured in CSF of 43 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. After this analysis, we validated the results in an independent PD study cohort (T€ubingen cohort). Results: We identified that dehydroascorbic acid levels were significantly lower and fructose, mannose, and threonic acid levels were significantly higher (P <.05) in PD patients when compared with healthy controls. These changes reflect pathological oxidative stress responses, as well as protein glycation/glycosylation reactions in PD. Using a machine learning approach based on logistic regression, we successfully predicted the origin (PD patients vs healthy controls) in a second (n518) as well as in a third and completely independent validation set (n536). The biomarker signature is composed of the three markers—mannose, threonic acid, and fructose—and allows for sample classification with a sensitivity of 0.790 and a specificity of 0.800. Conclusion: We identified PD-specific metabolic changes in CSF that were associated with antioxidative stress response, glycation, and inflammation. Our results disentangle the complexity of the CSF metabolome to unravel metabolome changes related to earlystage PD. The detected biomarkers help understanding PD pathogenesis and can be applied as biomarkers to increase clinical diagnosis accuracy and patient care in early-stage PD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 53 (11 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMetformin reverses TRAP1 mutation-associated alterations in mitochondrial function in Parkinson's disease
Fitzgerald, Julia C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Carvajal-Berrio, Daniel A. et al

in Brain : A Journal of Neurology (2017), 140(9), 2444-2459

The mitochondrial proteins TRAP1 and HtrA2 have previously been shown to be phosphorylated in the presence of the Parkinson’s disease kinase PINK1 but the downstream signaling is unclear. HtrA2 and PINK1 ... [more ▼]

The mitochondrial proteins TRAP1 and HtrA2 have previously been shown to be phosphorylated in the presence of the Parkinson’s disease kinase PINK1 but the downstream signaling is unclear. HtrA2 and PINK1 loss of function causes parkinsonism in humans and animals. Here, we identified TRAP1 as an interactor of HtrA2 using an unbiased mass spectrometry approach. In our human cell models, TRAP1 overexpression is protective, rescuing HtrA2 and PINK1-associated mitochondrial dysfunction and suggesting that TRAP1 acts downstream of HtrA2 and PINK1. HtrA2 regulates TRAP1 protein levels, but TRAP1 is not a direct target of HtrA2 protease activity. Following genetic screening of Parkinson’s disease patients and healthy controls, we also report the first TRAP1 mutation leading to complete loss of functional protein in a patient with late onset Parkinson’s disease. Analysis of fibroblasts derived from the patient reveal that oxygen consumption, ATP output and reactive oxygen species are increased compared to healthy individuals. This is coupled with an increased pool of free NADH, increased mitochondrial biogenesis, triggering of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and sensitivity to mitochondrial removal and apoptosis. These data highlight the role of TRAP1 in the regulation of energy metabolism and mitochondrial quality control. Interestingly, the diabetes drug metformin reverses mutation-associated alterations on energy metabolism, mitochondrial biogenesis and restores mitochondrial membrane potential. In summary, our data show that TRAP1 acts downstream of PINK1 and HtrA2 for mitochondrial fine tuning, whereas TRAP1 loss of function leads to reduced control of energy metabolism, ultimately impacting mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings offer new insight into mitochondrial pathologies in Parkinson’s disease and provide new prospects for targeted therapies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 237 (34 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailDoes uncoupling protein 2 expression qualify as marker of disease status in LRRK2-associated Parkinson's disease?
Grünewald, Anne UL; Arns, Bjorn; Meier, Britta et al

in Antioxidants & redox signaling (2014), 20(13), 1955-60

Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common known genetic cause of late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the penetrance of the disease is below 50% at 60 years of age ... [more ▼]

Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common known genetic cause of late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the penetrance of the disease is below 50% at 60 years of age. LRRK2 is associated with the mitochondrial membrane, and mutant forms impair the function of the organelle and autophagosome clearance in human cells, including induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons. Elevated expression of uncoupling proteins has been identified as the cause of mitochondrial depolarization in human fibroblasts with G2019S LRRK2. To identify factors that contribute to the penetrance of LRRK2 mutations, we studied respiratory chain function, markers of mitochondrial uncoupling, oxidative stress, and autophagy in fibroblasts from affected and unaffected carriers of the G2019S mutation. Independent of disease status, all mutation carriers showed reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, increased proton leakage, and more fragmented mitochondria. However, a significant increase in the expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) was only detected in affected individuals with the G2019S mutation in LRRK2. Since oxidative stress and autophagic markers were selectively increased in some of the PD patients, we hypothesize that UCP2 expression is upregulated in response to elevated reactive oxygen species generation in affected mutation carriers and that UCP2 mRNA levels might, therefore, serve as markers of disease status in LRRK2-associated PD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 42 (6 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailEIF4G1 is neither a strong nor a common risk factor for Parkinson's disease: evidence from large European cohorts
Huttenlocher, Johanna; Krüger, Rejko UL; Capetian, Philipp et al

in Journal of medical genetics (2014), 0

BACKGROUND: Missense mutations in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-gamma 1 (EIF4G1) gene have previously been implicated in familial Parkinson's disease (PD). A large PD family with ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Missense mutations in the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4-gamma 1 (EIF4G1) gene have previously been implicated in familial Parkinson's disease (PD). A large PD family with autosomal-dominant segregation showed a heterozygous missense mutation and additional patients were found to have unique sequence variants that have not been observed in controls. Subsequent studies have reported contradictory findings. METHODS: We assessed the relevance of EIF4G1 mutations in a European cohort of 2146 PD patients. Of these, 2051 sporadic PD patients were screened for the reported p.Ala502Val and p.Arg1205His mutations. In addition, the complete coding region of EIF4G1 was directly sequenced in 95 familial PD patients with autosomal-dominant inheritance. Moreover, we imputed the p.Arg1205His substitution and tested for association with PD in the Icelandic population (93 698 samples). RESULTS: We did not observe the presence of the p.Ala502Val substitution in our cohort; however, the p.Arg1205His mutation was identified in one sporadic PD patient. The same mutation was also found in 76 Icelandic subjects older than 65 years using haplotype imputing. Only five of these subjects reported PD symptoms (OR 1.3, p=0.50). Thus, if causal, the p.Arg1205His EIF4G1 mutation has a low penetrance or a late onset manifestation. A novel variant p.Arg566Cys found in a patient with familial PD did not cosegregate with PD in all three affected siblings. All further recently published EIF4G1 mutations found in our cohort are likely to be benign polymorphisms. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest genetic study of EIF4G1 mutations in PD. Our data do not support the EIF4G1 gene as a high-risk PD locus, neither for the familial nor the sporadic condition. Furthermore, the p.Arg1205His mutation is not significantly associated with increased risk of PD in the Icelandic population. Therefore, caution should be exercised when interpreting EIF4G1 genotyping results in isolated patients and PD families. In summary, diagnostic testing of EIF4G1 should not be recommended in clinical settings. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGenetic correction of a LRRK2 mutation in human iPSCs links parkinsonian neurodegeneration to ERK-dependent changes in gene expression.
Reinhardt, Peter; Schmid, Benjamin; Burbulla, Lena F. et al

in Cell Stem Cell (2013), 12(3), 354-67

The LRRK2 mutation G2019S is the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). To better understand the link between mutant LRRK2 and PD pathology, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells from ... [more ▼]

The LRRK2 mutation G2019S is the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). To better understand the link between mutant LRRK2 and PD pathology, we derived induced pluripotent stem cells from PD patients harboring LRRK2 G2019S and then specifically corrected the mutant LRRK2 allele. We demonstrate that gene correction resulted in phenotypic rescue in differentiated neurons and uncovered expression changes associated with LRRK2 G2019S. We found that LRRK2 G2019S induced dysregulation of CPNE8, MAP7, UHRF2, ANXA1, and CADPS2. Knockdown experiments demonstrated that four of these genes contribute to dopaminergic neurodegeneration. LRRK2 G2019S induced increased extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation. Transcriptional dysregulation of CADPS2, CPNE8, and UHRF2 was dependent on ERK activity. We show that multiple PD-associated phenotypes were ameliorated by inhibition of ERK. Therefore, our results provide mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis induced by mutant LRRK2 and pointers for the development of potential new therapeutics. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 163 (9 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLong-term follow-up of subthalamic nucleus stimulation in glucocerebrosidase-associated Parkinson's disease.
Weiss, Daniel; Brockmann, Kathrin; Srulijes, Karin et al

in Journal of neurology (2012), 259(9), 1970-2

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (0 UL)