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See detailIndicators for assessing the necessity of power system flexibility: a systematic review and literature meta‐analysis
Bhuiyan, Rajon UL; Weissflog, Jan; Schoepf, Michael et al

Scientific Conference (2022, September)

There are different flexibility options to align power systems to volatile feed-in of renewable electricity sources. The flexibility options differ in the dimensions of time, spatiality, and resource type ... [more ▼]

There are different flexibility options to align power systems to volatile feed-in of renewable electricity sources. The flexibility options differ in the dimensions of time, spatiality, and resource type. To make policy decisions on future energy systems, it is necessary to get a top-down indication of how much power system flexibility is needed. With the ongoing energy transition, there is yet no comprehensive overview of indicators that describe which dimension of flexibility will be necessary to what extent for different energy systems. Therefore, this paper provides a first overview of indicators that can be used to assess the necessity of power system flexibility. Thus, we do a systematic literature review to identify indicators that allow us to estimate the necessity of power system flexibility. We conduct a meta-analysis of these indicators and categorize them as indicators that either stand for an increasing or decreasing necessity of power system flexibility. Our paper can help inform policy, assess needed changes to system operations, increase stakeholder acceptance and investor confidence in implementing new technology and measures. [less ▲]

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Peer Reviewed
See detailPotentials of sector coupling to improve the resilience of electricity and gas networks
Leinauer, Christina; Hanny, Lisa; Bhuiyan, Rajon UL et al

Scientific Conference (2022, July)

Global warming leads to an increase in extreme weather events that considerably threaten critical infrastructures (e.g., electricity or gas networks). The failure of one critical infrastructure may have ... [more ▼]

Global warming leads to an increase in extreme weather events that considerably threaten critical infrastructures (e.g., electricity or gas networks). The failure of one critical infrastructure may have far-reaching consequences triggering a “cascade of failures” that affects other critical infrastructures. As extreme weather events usually hit affected regions unexpectedly, flexibility in energy systems is key to sustain resilience and rapidly respond to changing conditions, e.g., failed network lines. Hence, we analyze sector coupling (SC) as one option to increase flexibility and exploit synergies between electricity and gas networks. We investigate SC investments that allow for a bi-directional conversion of gas and electricity in the form of gas-fired power plants or power-to-X technologies and their effect on resilience. We propose a two-level market model where, in the upper-level problem, long-term investments in SC technologies are made in anticipation of short-term market clearing as well as uncertain failures and, in the lower-level problem, SC technologies may be activated. We model extreme weather events as a set of discrete scenarios that pose an external risk to the energy system. In our paper, we derive optimal SC investments representing a trade-off between enhancing system resilience and increasing investments. Moreover, we derive optimal SC responses for selected weather events to guide the operation of SC plants under extreme conditions. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (1 UL)
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See detailAssessing the need for power system flexibility on a global level: A multi-criteria assessment index
Bhuiyan, Rajon UL

Presentation (2022, June 21)

To effectively cope with the intermittency of VRE, power systems will need different flexibility options. The future portfolio of flexibility options will differ among countries, as it will be determined ... [more ▼]

To effectively cope with the intermittency of VRE, power systems will need different flexibility options. The future portfolio of flexibility options will differ among countries, as it will be determined by the political, economic, social, technological, legal, and environmental factors of a country. Thus, some countries might have a greater need for flexibility options than others. Generation and expansion planning for renewable power systems on a national level are complex and require large long-term investments. Therefore, it is crucial to estimate the "need for flexibility" in energy systems from a macro-level. By assessing relevant indicators (e.g., economic) and different boundary conditions (e.g., VRE capacity), power system planners, policymakers, operators, and regulators can evaluate the need for flexibility in power systems and prioritize the needed actions. Published research and international reports do not refer to the countries with the highest need for flexibility options in respective power systems. In this regard, the aim of this paper is to answer the following question: "Which countries in the world have the highest need for flexibility options from a macro-energy systems point of view?" To answer our question, first, we have identified relevant indicators from the literature that can help us to estimate the "need for flexibility" in national power systems. Second, we weighed the different indicators according to their importance by using the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) of the multi- criteria decision analysis (MCDA) process. Finally, this paper proposes a “global index for flexibility need” using these indicators. As for the results, countries were ranked in this index based on indicators and already show us the promising countries with the top 10 dominated by European countries. This index works as a macro-level assessment framework that provides the comparative position of countries with regard to the need for flexibility. This index will help technology providers and increase investor confidence to choose countries with the highest "flexibility need" for technology implementation. This will help relevant stakeholders to focus on key countries first to accelerate the integration of VRE and thus help the global energy transition. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 20 (1 UL)