References of "Bentivoglio, Anna Rita"
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See detailAlpha-synuclein repeat variants and survival in Parkinson's disease.
Chung, Sun Ju; Biernacka, Joanna M.; Armasu, Sebastian M. et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2014)

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether alpha-synuclein dinucleotide repeat (REP1) genotypes are associated with survival in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: Investigators from the Genetic Epidemiology of ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: To determine whether alpha-synuclein dinucleotide repeat (REP1) genotypes are associated with survival in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: Investigators from the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's Disease Consortium provided REP1 genotypes and baseline and follow-up clinical data for cases. The primary outcome was time to death. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association of REP1 genotypes with survival. RESULTS: Twenty-one sites contributed data for 6,154 cases. There was no significant association between alpha-synuclein REP1 genotypes and survival in PD. However, there was a significant association between REP1 genotypes and age at onset of PD (hazard ratio: 1.06; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.10; P value = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In our large consortium study, alpha-synuclein REP1 genotypes were not associated with survival in PD. Further studies of alpha-synuclein's role in disease progression and long-term outcomes are needed. (c) 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. [less ▲]

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See detailGenome-wide association study in musician's dystonia: a risk variant at the arylsulfatase G locus?
Lohmann, Katja; Schmidt, Alexander; Schillert, Arne et al

in Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society (2014), 29(7), 921-7

Musician's dystonia (MD) affects 1% to 2% of professional musicians and frequently terminates performance careers. It is characterized by loss of voluntary motor control when playing the instrument ... [more ▼]

Musician's dystonia (MD) affects 1% to 2% of professional musicians and frequently terminates performance careers. It is characterized by loss of voluntary motor control when playing the instrument. Little is known about genetic risk factors, although MD or writer's dystonia (WD) occurs in relatives of 20% of MD patients. We conducted a 2-stage genome-wide association study in whites. Genotypes at 557,620 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) passed stringent quality control for 127 patients and 984 controls. Ten SNPs revealed P < 10(-5) and entered the replication phase including 116 MD patients and 125 healthy musicians. A genome-wide significant SNP (P < 5 x 10(-8) ) was also genotyped in 208 German or Dutch WD patients, 1,969 Caucasian, Spanish, and Japanese patients with other forms of focal or segmental dystonia as well as in 2,233 ethnically matched controls. Genome-wide significance with MD was observed for an intronic variant in the arylsulfatase G (ARSG) gene (rs11655081; P = 3.95 x 10(-9) ; odds ratio [OR], 4.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.66-7.05). rs11655081 was also associated with WD (P = 2.78 x 10(-2) ) but not with any other focal or segmental dystonia. The allele frequency of rs11655081 varies substantially between different populations. The population stratification in our sample was modest (lambda = 1.07), but the effect size may be overestimated. Using a small but homogenous patient sample, we provide data for a possible association of ARSG with MD. The variant may also contribute to the risk of WD, a form of dystonia that is often found in relatives of MD patients. [less ▲]

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See detailA large-scale genetic association study to evaluate the contribution of Omi/HtrA2 (PARK13) to Parkinson's disease.
Krüger, Rejko UL; Sharma, Manu; Riess, Olaf et al

in Neurobiology of aging (2011), 32(3), 5489-18

High-profile studies have provided conflicting results regarding the involvement of the Omi/HtrA2 gene in Parkinson's disease (PD) susceptibility. Therefore, we performed a large-scale analysis of the ... [more ▼]

High-profile studies have provided conflicting results regarding the involvement of the Omi/HtrA2 gene in Parkinson's disease (PD) susceptibility. Therefore, we performed a large-scale analysis of the association of common Omi/HtrA2 variants in the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson's disease (GEO-PD) consortium. GEO-PD sites provided clinical and genetic data including affection status, gender, ethnicity, age at study, age at examination (all subjects); age at onset and family history of PD (patients). Genotyping was performed for the five most informative SNPs spanning the Omi/HtrA2 gene in approximately 2-3 kb intervals (rs10779958, rs2231250, rs72470544, rs1183739, rs2241028). Fixed as well as random effect models were used to provide summary risk estimates of Omi/HtrA2 variants. The 20 GEO-PD sites provided data for 6378 cases and 8880 controls. No overall significant associations for the five Omi/HtrA2 SNPs and PD were observed using either fixed effect or random effect models. The summary odds ratios ranged between 0.98 and 1.08 and the estimates of between-study heterogeneity were not large (non-significant Q statistics for all 5 SNPs; I(2) estimates 0-28%). Trends for association were seen for participants of Scandinavian descent for rs2241028 (OR 1.41, p=0.04) and for rs1183739 for age at examination (cut-off 65 years; OR 1.17, p=0.02), but these would not be significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons and their Bayes factors were only modest. This largest association study performed to define the role of any gene in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease revealed no overall strong association of Omi/HtrA2 variants with PD in populations worldwide. [less ▲]

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See detailRole of sepiapterin reductase gene at the PARK3 locus in Parkinson's disease.
Sharma, Manu; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Ioannidis, John P. A. et al

in Neurobiology of aging (2011), 32(11), 21081-5

Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) gene is an enzyme which catalyses the final step of tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis (BH4) and was implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis as a candidate gene for ... [more ▼]

Sepiapterin reductase (SPR) gene is an enzyme which catalyses the final step of tetrahydrobiopterin synthesis (BH4) and was implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis as a candidate gene for PARK3 locus. A number of studies yielded association of the PARK3 locus with PD, and SPR knockout mice were shown to display parkinsonian features. To evaluate the role of SPR gene polymorphisms in diverse populations in PD, we performed collaborative analyses in the Genetic Epidemiology of Parkinson Disease (GEO-PD) Consortium. A total of 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (3 in the promoter region and 2 in the 3' untranslated region [UTR]) were genotyped. Fixed as well as random effect models were used to provide summary risk estimates of SPR variants. A total of 19 sites provided data for 6547 cases and 9321 controls. Overall odds ratio estimates varied from 0.92 to 1.01. No overall association with the SPR gene using either fixed effect or random effect model was observed in the studied population. I(2) Metric varied from 0% to 36.2%. There was some evidence for an association for participants of North European/Scandinavian descent with the strongest signal for rs1876487 (odds ratio = 0.82; p value = 0.003). Interestingly, families which were used to map the PARK3 locus, have Scandinavian ancestry suggesting a founder effect. In conclusion, this large association study for the SPR gene revealed no association for PD worldwide. However, taking the initial mapping of the PARK3 into account, the role of a population-specific effect warrants consideration in future studies. [less ▲]

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