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See detailDe novo mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS).
Karle, Kathrin N.; Biskup, Saskia; Schule, Rebecca et al

in Neurology (2013), 81(23), 2039-44

OBJECTIVE: Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) is caused by autosomal-dominantly inherited mutations in the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene, and is ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: Hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS) is caused by autosomal-dominantly inherited mutations in the colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) gene, and is clinically characterized by a progressive cognitive and motor decline leading to death within several years. METHODS: In a continuous series of 25 patients with adult-onset leukoencephalopathy of unknown cause, we genetically confirmed HDLS in 6 families. Affected and nonaffected individuals were examined clinically and by brain MRI studies. RESULTS: HDLS presented as prominent dementia and apraxia, often with extrapyramidal and pyramidal signs, rarely with ataxia. White matter MRI changes were detectable early in the disease course. Family history was negative in 4 of 6 index patients. In 2 of 6 index patients, we could confirm the occurrence of de novo mutations in the CSF1R gene. One family showed possible incomplete penetrance: the 69-year-old father of the index patient carried a CSF1R mutation but was clinically unaffected. In one family, the parents were apparently unaffected and not available for genetic testing. CONCLUSIONS: Typical clinical phenotype and early brain MRI alterations can help to guide the diagnosis of HDLS. Because we confirmed de novo mutations in one-third of patients with CSF1R mutations, this diagnosis should be considered even in the absence of a family history. Furthermore, we present evidence for reduced penetrance of a CSF1R mutation. These results have substantial impact for genetic counseling of asymptomatic individuals at risk and should foster research into disease-modifying factors. [less ▲]

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See detailNigral stimulation for resistant axial motor impairment in Parkinson's disease? A randomized controlled trial.
Weiss, Daniel; Walach, Margarete; Meisner, Christoph et al

in Brain : a journal of neurology (2013), 136(Pt 7), 2098-108

Gait and balance disturbances typically emerge in advanced Parkinson's disease with generally limited response to dopaminergic medication and subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Therefore ... [more ▼]

Gait and balance disturbances typically emerge in advanced Parkinson's disease with generally limited response to dopaminergic medication and subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Therefore, advanced programming with interleaved pulses was put forward to introduce concomittant nigral stimulation on caudal contacts of a subthalamic lead. Here, we hypothesized that the combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata improves axial symptoms compared with standard subthalamic nucleus stimulation. Twelve patients were enrolled in this 2 x 2 cross-over double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial and both the safety and efficacy of combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation were evaluated compared with standard subthalamic nucleus stimulation. The primary outcome measure was the change of a broad-scaled cumulative axial Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale score (Scale II items 13-15, Scale III items 27-31) at '3-week follow-up'. Secondary outcome measures specifically addressed freezing of gait, balance, quality of life, non-motor symptoms and neuropsychiatric symptoms. For the primary outcome measure no statistically significant improvement was observed for combined subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation at the '3-week follow-up'. The secondary endpoints, however, revealed that the combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata might specifically improve freezing of gait, whereas balance impairment remained unchanged. The combined stimulation of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata was safe, and of note, no clinically relevant neuropsychiatric adverse effect was observed. Patients treated with subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars reticulata stimulation revealed no 'global' effect on axial motor domains. However, this study opens the perspective that concomittant stimulation of the substantia nigra pars reticulata possibly improves otherwise resistant freezing of gait and, therefore, highly warrants a subsequent phase III randomized controlled trial. [less ▲]

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