References of "Bavelier, Daphne"
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See detailA Mixture of Generative Models Strategy Helps Humans Generalize across Tasks
Herce Castañón, Santiago; Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Altarelli, Irene et al

E-print/Working paper (2021)

What role do generative models play in generalization of learning in humans? Our novel multi-task prediction paradigm—where participants complete four sequence learning tasks, each being a different ... [more ▼]

What role do generative models play in generalization of learning in humans? Our novel multi-task prediction paradigm—where participants complete four sequence learning tasks, each being a different instance of a common generative family—allows the separate study of within-task learning (i.e., finding the solution to each of the tasks), and across-task learning (i.e., learning a task differently because of past experiences). The very first responses participants make in each task are not yet affected by within-task learning and thus reflect their priors. Our results show that these priors change across successive tasks, increasingly resembling the underlying generative family. We conceptualize multi-task learning as arising from a mixture-of-generative-models learning strategy, whereby participants simultaneously entertain multiple candidate models which compete against each other to explain the experienced sequences. This framework predicts specific error patterns, as well as a gating mechanism for learning, both of which are observed in the data. [less ▲]

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See detailTraining Cognition with Video Games
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Ansarinia, Morteza UL; Schmück, Emmanuel UL et al

in Cohen Kadosh, Kathrin (Ed.) The Oxford Handbook of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience (2021)

This chapter reviews the behavioral and neuroimaging scientific literature on the cognitive consequences of playing various genres of video games. The available research highlights that not all video ... [more ▼]

This chapter reviews the behavioral and neuroimaging scientific literature on the cognitive consequences of playing various genres of video games. The available research highlights that not all video games have similar cognitive impact; action video games as defined by first- and third-person shooter games have been associated with greater cognitive enhancement, especially when it comes to top-down attention, than puzzle or life-simulation games. This state of affairs suggests specific game mechanics need to be embodied in a video game for it to enhance cognition. These hypothesized game mechanics are reviewed; yet, the authors note that the advent of more complex, hybrid, video games poses new research challenges and call for a more systematic assessment of how specific video game mechanics relate to cognitive enhancement. [less ▲]

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See detailGames for enhancing cognitive abilities
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Joessel, Augustin; Bavelier, Daphne

in Plass, Jan; Mayer, Richard E; Homer, Bruce D (Eds.) Handbook of Game-based Learning (2020)

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See detailMedia use, attention, mental health and academic performance among 8 to 12 year old children
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Buchard, Albert; Tissieres, Isabel et al

E-print/Working paper (2020)

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See detailThe impact of action video game training on mathematical abilities in adults
Libertus, Melissa E.; Liu, Allison; Pikul, Olga et al

in AERA Open (2017), 3(4), 2332858417740857

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See detailTechnology consumption and cognitive control: Contrasting action video game experience with media multitasking.
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Kludt, Rachel; Vignola, Gianluca et al

in Attention, perception & psychophysics (2016), 78(1), 218-41

Technology has the potential to impact cognition in many ways. Here we contrast two forms of technology usage: (1) media multitasking (i.e., the simultaneous consumption of multiple streams of media, such ... [more ▼]

Technology has the potential to impact cognition in many ways. Here we contrast two forms of technology usage: (1) media multitasking (i.e., the simultaneous consumption of multiple streams of media, such a texting while watching TV) and (2) playing action video games (a particular subtype of video games). Previous work has outlined an association between high levels of media multitasking and specific deficits in handling distracting information, whereas playing action video games has been associated with enhanced attentional control. Because these two factors are linked with reasonably opposing effects, failing to take them jointly into account may result in inappropriate conclusions as to the impacts of technology use on attention. Across four tasks (AX-continuous performance, N-back, task-switching, and filter tasks), testing different aspects of attention and cognition, we showed that heavy media multitaskers perform worse than light media multitaskers. Contrary to previous reports, though, the performance deficit was not specifically tied to distractors, but was instead more global in nature. Interestingly, participants with intermediate levels of media multitasking sometimes performed better than both light and heavy media multitaskers, suggesting that the effects of increasing media multitasking are not monotonic. Action video game players, as expected, outperformed non-video-game players on all tasks. However, surprisingly, this was true only for participants with intermediate levels of media multitasking, suggesting that playing action video games does not protect against the deleterious effect of heavy media multitasking. Taken together, these findings show that media consumption can have complex and counterintuitive effects on attentional control. [less ▲]

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See detailOn the impact of new technologies on multitasking
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Green, C. Shawn; Bavelier, Daphne

in Developmental Review (2015), 35

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See detailMethods to test visual attention online.
Yung, Amanda; Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Dale, Gillian et al

in Journal of Visualized Experiments (2015), (96),

Online data collection methods have particular appeal to behavioral scientists because they offer the promise of much larger and much more representative data samples than can typically be collected on ... [more ▼]

Online data collection methods have particular appeal to behavioral scientists because they offer the promise of much larger and much more representative data samples than can typically be collected on college campuses. However, before such methods can be widely adopted, a number of technological challenges must be overcome--in particular in experiments where tight control over stimulus properties is necessary. Here we present methods for collecting performance data on two tests of visual attention. Both tests require control over the visual angle of the stimuli (which in turn requires knowledge of the viewing distance, monitor size, screen resolution, etc.) and the timing of the stimuli (as the tests involve either briefly flashed stimuli or stimuli that move at specific rates). Data collected on these tests from over 1,700 online participants were consistent with data collected in laboratory-based versions of the exact same tests. These results suggest that with proper care, timing/stimulus size dependent tasks can be deployed in web-based settings. [less ▲]

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See detailVideo game play, attention, and learning: how to shape the development of attention and influence learning?
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Bavelier, Daphne

in Current opinion in neurology (2014), 27(2), 185-91

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The notion that play may facilitate learning has long been touted. Here, we review how video game play may be leveraged for enhancing attentional control, allowing greater cognitive ... [more ▼]

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The notion that play may facilitate learning has long been touted. Here, we review how video game play may be leveraged for enhancing attentional control, allowing greater cognitive flexibility and learning and in turn new routes to better address developmental disorders. RECENT FINDINGS: Video games, initially developed for entertainment, appear to enhance the behavior in domains as varied as perception, attention, task switching, or mental rotation. This surprisingly wide transfer may be mediated by enhanced attentional control, allowing increased signal-to-noise ratio and thus more informed decisions. SUMMARY: The possibility of enhancing attentional control through targeted interventions, be it computerized training or self-regulation techniques, is now well established. Embedding such training in video game play is appealing, given the astounding amount of time spent by children and adults worldwide with this media. It holds the promise of increasing compliance in patients and motivation in school children, and of enhancing the use of positive impact games. Yet for all the promises, existing research indicates that not all games are created equal: a better understanding of the game play elements that foster attention and learning as well as of the strategies developed by the players is needed. Computational models from machine learning or developmental robotics provide a rich theoretical framework to develop this work further and address its impact on developmental disorders. [less ▲]

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See detailBrain plasticity: Paradoxical case of a neurodegenerative disease?
Cardoso-Leite, Pedro UL; Ascher, Philippe; Bavelier, Daphne

in Current Biology (2012), 22(20), 884-6

A thought-provoking new study has found that symptom-free carriers of the neurodegenerative Huntington's disease present a dramatic two-fold acceleration in perceptual learning.

Detailed reference viewed: 30 (2 UL)