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See detail“That’s a value I would transmit in some way, but how concretely, I don’t know” – Intergenerational value transfer revisited in light of memory
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros, Stephanie; Boulanger, Dany

in Wagoner, Brady; Bresco, I.; Zadeh, S. (Eds.) Memory in the Wild (in press)

Intergenerational value transmission occurs widely and to a large extent within the family as primary socialization agent. In families, children are confronted with specific practices, paradigms, rules ... [more ▼]

Intergenerational value transmission occurs widely and to a large extent within the family as primary socialization agent. In families, children are confronted with specific practices, paradigms, rules and routines which are part of their family culture (Albert & Barros Coimbra, 2017) and as such family is a mediator between societal/cultural and individual values. The ability to transmit values is essential for collective knowledge and memory, the continuity of value orientations being a main feature of intergenerational relations that enables members of different generations to communicate with each other (Barni, Rosnati, & Ranieri, 2013; Halbwachs, 1941/1992; Schönpflug, 2001). Intergenerational transmission of values becomes particularly complex in the context of migration or in times of rapid social change. On the one hand, family identity and traditions might provide a secure base in light of a changing context, and parents might find it important to transmit traditional values to the next generation in order to keep memories alive. At the same time, they might feel that their children should adapt to the changed cultural context, resulting in a (not always clear) dilemma about what they want for their children. How can migrant parents reconcile or move between the different collective frameworks of their culture of origin and the receiving culture (Middleton & Brown, 2005)? In the following, we will first give a brief overview over research in the area of intergenerational value transmission, and we will second illustrate and further inform our theoretical assumptions by identifying related themes and phenomena in our qualitative dyadic interviews. Then, we will delve into memory as a horizon that is emerging out of the analysis as a transversal theme. From this point of view, we continue the analysis and progressively integrate the notions pertaining to the role of memory in the intergenerational transmission of values. Aspects of cultural background are apparent in the excerpts that we will quote supporting the themes we will refer to. We will more explicitly return to this in our conclusions. [less ▲]

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See detailINTERGENERATIONAL VALUE TRANSMISSION AND THE ROLE OF MOTIVATIONAL PROCESSES IN MIGRANT AND NON-MIGRANT FAMILIES
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros, Stephanie; Coimbra, Susana

Scientific Conference (2019, September 01)

The intergenerational transmission of values from one generation to the next is essential for the continuity of a society as it facilitates communication between members of different generations and ... [more ▼]

The intergenerational transmission of values from one generation to the next is essential for the continuity of a society as it facilitates communication between members of different generations and within families, where shared values constitute a part of the family identity. In the context of acculturation, traditions can provide a secure base for migrants who have to adapt to a new living context. On the one hand, parents in migrant families might find it particularly important to transmit traditional values to the next generation, on the other hand offspring can be confronted with diverse value orientations in the receiving culture, and therefore special efforts might be needed to transmit traditional values. The current study is part of the larger FNR-funded IRMA project and presents a crosscultural comparison of n = 154 triads of parents and their (young) adult children from Luxembourgish native and Portuguese immigrant families in Luxembourg, as well as a subsample of Portuguese families living in Portugal. Participants from both generations filled out a standardized questionnaire assessing general value orientations, perceived value similarity as well as parental motivation to transmit respectively children’s motivation to take over parental values. Results showed that parental motivation to transmit values was particularly high in Portuguese families (in Portugal and Luxembourg), although no differences in perceived value similarity between the three subsamples occurred. Whereas parental motivation for transmission was related to the value of tradition in all three subsamples, perceived similarity between parents and their adult children was related to their selforiented values. Concerning consensus in value profiles, the role of motivational processes will be further explored, and effects of culture and migration will be discussed in an integrative framework of intergenerational relations in light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailCare preferences in the context of migration: nursing home, mobile assistance or family?
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros, Stephanie; Coimbra, Susana

Scientific Conference (2019, May 24)

Theoretical background: Cultures differ in how they arrange old age care and intergenerational co-residence patterns. Whereas Southern European countries rely more on family support, in Western/Northern ... [more ▼]

Theoretical background: Cultures differ in how they arrange old age care and intergenerational co-residence patterns. Whereas Southern European countries rely more on family support, in Western/Northern European countries state provision is higher with a clear preference for paid care work. When families migrate from a more collectivist, family-oriented to a more individualist cultural context, the question arises in how far traditional care patterns from the country of origin are retained or adapted to the host cultural context. Objectives: The aims of our study were to examine 1) if different care preferences can be found between three subsamples - from independently-oriented vs. more family oriented contexts as well as migrants from one to the other, and 2) in how far differences can be explained by relationship indicators, value orientations and sociodemographic variables. Methods: Drawing on data from the FNR-funded IRMA study, we compared three subgroups of N = 359 adults between the ages of 46 and 80 - Luxembourgers and Portuguese as well as Portuguese immigrants living in Luxembourg. Results/Discussion: Controlling for socio-demographic variables, our results showed differences in care preferences as well as in how these could be explained by further variables. Most Luxembourgers preferred to be cared for at home with a mobile service; this preference was followed by institutional care and only few preferred to live with their adult children. In contrast, institutional care was rarely chosen as a preference by Portuguese living in Luxembourg and in Portugal where care provision from children was preferred more often. Whereas relationship quality, expectations of adult children and current support exchange were high for participants who preferred care by adult children in all three subsamples, differences were found with regard to family orientation which was more important for care preferences of participants living in Luxembourg than Portugal. Results are discussed in a theoretical framework of intergenerational relations in light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailLuxembourgish national identity and natives’ perception of immigrants
Barros, Stephanie; Roth, Kiara; Albert, Isabelle UL et al

Poster (2017, July)

Migration is an important issue nowadays even more so in the light of the growing antimigrant attitudes we are currently witnessing all over the world. Luxemburg’s history, as many other countries, is ... [more ▼]

Migration is an important issue nowadays even more so in the light of the growing antimigrant attitudes we are currently witnessing all over the world. Luxemburg’s history, as many other countries, is also shaped by important migration waves as well as a growing national consciousness. It is therefore crucial to delve deeper into the way foreigners are perceived by natives in countries with dense immigrant populations. In the present study, we will have a closer look on the perceived threat from Luxembourgish natives’ viewpoint (N = 227; Mage = 37.2, SD = 14.9; range: 16-74; 59% of girls) regarding immigrants in general that could in a long-term perspective favour hostile attitudes towards foreigners. First analyses have showed that commitment to the own national identity, sense of security, satisfaction with current life and a higher proportion of non-Luxembourgish individuals within the circle of friends and own family are related with a lower perceived threat. [less ▲]

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