References of "Antony, Paul 50000431"
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See detailFibroblast mitochondria in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease display morphological changes and enhanced resistance to depolarization
Krüger, Rejko UL; Balling, Rudolf UL; Antony, Paul UL et al

in Scientific Reports (2020)

Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Here, we established screenable phenotypes of mitochondrial morphology and function in primary fibroblasts derived from ... [more ▼]

Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark in idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Here, we established screenable phenotypes of mitochondrial morphology and function in primary fibroblasts derived from patients with IPD. Upper arm punch skin biopsy was performed in 41 patients with mid-stage IPD and 21 age-matched healthy controls. At the single-cell level, the basal mitochondrial membrane potential (Ψm) was higher in patients with IPD than in controls. Similarly, under carbonyl cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) stress, the remaining Ψm was increased in patients with IPD. Analysis of mitochondrial morphometric parameters revealed significantly decreased mitochondrial connectivity in patients with IPD, with 9 of 14 morphometric mitochondrial parameters differing from those in controls. Significant morphometric mitochondrial changes included the node degree, mean volume, skeleton size, perimeter, form factor, node count, erosion body count, endpoints, and mitochondria count (all P-values < 0.05). These functional data reveal that resistance to depolarization was increased by treatment with the protonophore FCCP in patients with IPD, whereas morphometric data revealed decreased mitochondrial connectivity and increased mitochondrial fragmentation. [less ▲]

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See detailImpaired Mitochondrial-Endoplasmic Reticulum Interaction and Mitophagy in Miro1-Mutant Neurons in Parkinson’s Disease
Berenguer-Escuder, Clara; Grossmann, Dajana; Antony, Paul UL et al

in Human Molecular Genetics (2020)

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See detailMachine learning-assisted neurotoxicity prediction in human midbrain organoids
Monzel, Anna Sophia UL; Hemmer, K; Smits, Lisa UL et al

in Parkinsonism and Related Disorders (2020)

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See detailVariants in Miro1 cause alterations of ER-mitochondria contact sites in fibroblasts from Parkinson's disease patients
Berenguer, Clara UL; Grossmann, Dajana; Massart, François UL et al

in Journal of Clinical Medicine (2019)

Background: Although most cases of Parkinson´s disease (PD) are idiopathic with unknown cause, an increasing number of genes and genetic risk factors have been discovered that play a role in PD ... [more ▼]

Background: Although most cases of Parkinson´s disease (PD) are idiopathic with unknown cause, an increasing number of genes and genetic risk factors have been discovered that play a role in PD pathogenesis. Many of the PD‐associated proteins are involved in mitochondrial quality control, e.g., PINK1, Parkin, and LRRK2, which were recently identified as regulators of mitochondrial‐endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contact sites (MERCs) linking mitochondrial homeostasis to intracellular calcium handling. In this context, Miro1 is increasingly recognized to play a role in PD pathology. Recently, we identified the first PD patients carrying mutations in RHOT1, the gene coding for Miro1. Here, we describe two novel RHOT1 mutations identified in two PD patients and the characterization of the cellular phenotypes. Methods: Using whole exome sequencing we identified two PD patients carrying heterozygous mutations leading to the amino acid exchanges T351A and T610A in Miro1. We analyzed calcium homeostasis and MERCs in detail by live cell imaging and immunocytochemistry in patient‐derived fibroblasts. Results: We show that fibroblasts expressing mutant T351A or T610A Miro1 display impaired calcium homeostasis and a reduced amount of MERCs. All fibroblast lines from patients with pathogenic variants in Miro1, revealed alterations of the structure of MERCs. Conclusion: Our data suggest that Miro1 is important for the regulation of the structure and function of MERCs. Moreover, our study supports the role of MERCs in the pathogenesis of PD and further establishes variants in RHOT1 as rare genetic risk factors for neurodegeneration. [less ▲]

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See detailFrom tech to bench: Deep Learning pipeline for image segmentation of high-throughput high-content microscopy data
Garcia Santa Cruz, Beatriz UL; Jarazo, Javier UL; Saraiva, Claudia UL et al

Poster (2019, November 29)

Automation of biological image analysis is essential to boost biomedical research. The study of complex diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases calls for big amounts of data to build models towards ... [more ▼]

Automation of biological image analysis is essential to boost biomedical research. The study of complex diseases such as neurodegenerative diseases calls for big amounts of data to build models towards precision medicine. Such data acquisition is feasible in the context of high-throughput screening in which the quality of the results relays on the accuracy of image analysis. Although the state-of-the-art solutions for image segmentation employ deep learning approaches, the high cost of manual data curation is hampering the real use in current biomedical research laboratories. Here, we propose a pipeline that employs deep learning not only to conduct accurate segmentation but also to assist with the creation of high-quality datasets in a less time-consuming solution for the experts. Weakly-labelled datasets are becoming a common alternative as a starting point to develop real-world solutions. Traditional approaches based on classical multimedia signal processing were employed to generate a pipeline specifically optimized for the high-throughput screening images of iPSC fused with rosella biosensor. Such pipeline produced good segmentation results but with several inaccuracies. We employed the weakly-labelled masks produced in this pipeline to train a multiclass semantic segmentation CNN solution based on U-net architecture. Since a strong class imbalance was detected between the classes, we employed a class sensitive cost function: Dice coe!cient. Next, we evaluated the accuracy between the weakly-labelled data and the trained network segmentation using double-blind tests conducted by experts in cell biology with experience in this type of images; as well as traditional metrics to evaluate the quality of the segmentation using manually curated segmentations by cell biology experts. In all the evaluations the prediction of the neural network overcomes the weakly-labelled data quality segmentation. Another big handicap that complicates the use of deep learning solutions in wet lab environments is the lack of user-friendly tools for non-computational experts such as biologists. To complete our solution, we integrated the trained network on a GUI built on MATLAB environment with non-programming requirements for the user. This integration allows conducting semantic segmentation of microscopy images in a few seconds. In addition, thanks to the patch-based approach it can be employed in images with different sizes. Finally, the human-experts can correct the potential inaccuracies of the prediction in a simple interactive way which can be easily stored and employed to re-train the network to improve its accuracy. In conclusion, our solution focuses on two important bottlenecks to translate leading-edge technologies in computer vision to biomedical research: On one hand, the effortless obtention of high-quality datasets with expertise supervision taking advantage of the proven ability of our CNN solution to generalize from weakly-labelled inaccuracies. On the other hand, the ease of use provided by the GUI integration of our solution to both segment images and interact with the predicted output. Overall this approach looks promising for fast adaptability to new scenarios. [less ▲]

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See detailMutations in RHOT1 disrupt ER-mitochondria contact sites interfering with calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial dynamics in Parkinson's disease.
Grossmann, Dajana UL; Berenguer, Clara UL; Bellet, Marie Estelle et al

in Antioxidants & redox signaling (2019)

OBJECTIVE: The outer mitochondrial membrane protein Miro1 is a crucial player in mitochondrial dynamics and calcium homeostasis. Recent evidence indicated that Miro1 mediates calcium-induced mitochondrial ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The outer mitochondrial membrane protein Miro1 is a crucial player in mitochondrial dynamics and calcium homeostasis. Recent evidence indicated that Miro1 mediates calcium-induced mitochondrial shape transition (MiST), which is a prerequisite for the initiation of mitophagy. Moreover, altered Miro1 protein levels have emerged as a shared feature of monogenic and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), but, so far, no disease-associated variants in RHOT1 have been identified. RESULTS: Here, for the first time, we describe heterozygous RHOT1 mutations in two PD patients (het c.815G>A; het c.1348C>T) and identified mitochondrial phenotypes with reduced mitochondrial mass in patient-derived cellular models. Both mutations lead to decreased ER-mitochondrial contact sites and calcium dyshomeostasis. As a consequence, energy metabolism was impaired, which in turn lead to increased mitophagy. CONCLUSION: In summary, our data support the role of Miro1 in maintaining calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial quality control in PD. [less ▲]

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See detailAutomated high-throughput high-content autophagy and mitophagy analysis platform
Arias, Jonathan UL; Jarazo, Javier UL; Walter, Jonas UL et al

in Scientific Reports (2019)

Autophagic processes play a central role in cellular homeostasis. In pathological conditions, the flow of autophagy can be affected at multiple and distinct steps of the pathway. Current analyses tools do ... [more ▼]

Autophagic processes play a central role in cellular homeostasis. In pathological conditions, the flow of autophagy can be affected at multiple and distinct steps of the pathway. Current analyses tools do not deliver the required detail for dissecting pathway intermediates. The development of new tools to analyze autophagic processes qualitatively and quantitatively in a more straightforward manner is required. Defining all autophagy pathway intermediates in a high-throughput manner is technologically challenging and has not been addressed yet. Here, we overcome those requirements and limitations by the developed of stable autophagy and mitophagy reporter-iPSC and the establishment of a novel high-throughput phenotyping platform utilizing automated high-content image analysis to assess autophagy and mitophagy pathway intermediates. [less ▲]

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See detailSingle-cell transcriptomics reveals multiple neuronal cell types in human midbrain-specific organoids
Smits, Lisa UL; Magni, Stefano UL; Grzyb, Kamil UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2019)

Human stem cell-derived organoids have great potential for modelling physiological and pathological processes. They recapitulate in vitro the organisation and function of a respective organ or part of an ... [more ▼]

Human stem cell-derived organoids have great potential for modelling physiological and pathological processes. They recapitulate in vitro the organisation and function of a respective organ or part of an organ. Human midbrain organoids (hMOs) have been described to contain midbrain-specific dopaminergic neurons that release the neurotransmitter dopamine. However, the human midbrain contains also additional neuronal cell types, which are functionally interacting with each other. Here, we analysed hMOs at high-resolution by means of single-cell RNA-sequencing (scRNA-seq), imaging and electrophysiology to unravel cell heterogeneity. Our findings demonstrate that hMOs show essential neuronal functional properties as spontaneous electrophysiological activity of different neuronal subtypes, including dopaminergic, GABAergic, and glutamatergic neurons. Recapitulating these in vivo features makes hMOs an excellent tool for in vitro disease phenotyping and drug discovery. [less ▲]

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See detailModeling Parkinson’s disease in midbrain-like organoids
Smits, Lisa UL; Reinhardt, Lydia; Reinhardt, Peter et al

in NPJ Parkinson's Disease (2019)

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See detailImpaired serine metabolism complements LRRK2-G2019S pathogenicity in PD patients
Nickels, Sarah UL; Walter, Jonas; Bolognin, Silvia UL et al

in Parkinsonism and Related Disorders (2019)

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See detailTranscriptome profiling data reveals Ubiquitin-Specific Peptidase 9 knockdown effects
Glaab, Enrico UL; Antony, Paul UL; Köglsberger, Sandra et al

in Data in Brief (2019), 25(1), 104130

Ubiquitin specific peptidase 9 (USP9) is a deubiquitinase encoded by a sex-linked gene with a Y-chromosomal form (USP9Y) and an X-chromosomal form (USP9X) that escapes X-inactivation. Since USP9 is a key ... [more ▼]

Ubiquitin specific peptidase 9 (USP9) is a deubiquitinase encoded by a sex-linked gene with a Y-chromosomal form (USP9Y) and an X-chromosomal form (USP9X) that escapes X-inactivation. Since USP9 is a key regulatory gene with sex-linked expression in the human brain, the gene may be of interest for researchers studying molecular gender differences and ubiquitin signaling in the brain. To assess the downstream effects of knocking down USP9X and USP9Y on a transcriptome-wide scale, we have conducted microarray profiling experiments using the human DU145 prostate cancer cell culture model, after confirming the robust expression of both USP9X and USP9Y in this model. By designing shRNA constructs for the specific knockdown of USP9X and the joint knockdown of USP9X and USP9Y, we have compared gene expression changes in both knockdowns to control conditions to infer potential shared and X- or Y-form specific alterations. Here, we provide details of the corresponding microarray profiling data, which has been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus database (GEO series accession number GSE79376). A biological interpretation of the data in the context of a potential involvement of USP9 in Alzheimer’s disease has previously been presented in Köglsberger et al. (2016). To facilitate the re-use and re-analysis of the data for other applications, e.g. the study of ubiquitin signaling and protein turnover control, and the regulation of molecular gender differences in the human brain and brain-related disorders, we provide a more in-depth discussion of the data properties, specifications and possible use cases. [less ▲]

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See detail3D Cultures of Parkinson's Disease‐Specific Dopaminergic Neurons for High Content Phenotyping and Drug Testing
Bolognin, Silvia UL; Fossépré, Marie; Qing, Xiaobing et al

in Advanced Science (2018)

Parkinson's disease (PD)‐specific neurons, grown in standard 2D cultures, typically only display weak endophenotypes. The cultivation of PD patient‐specific neurons, derived from induced pluripotent stem ... [more ▼]

Parkinson's disease (PD)‐specific neurons, grown in standard 2D cultures, typically only display weak endophenotypes. The cultivation of PD patient‐specific neurons, derived from induced pluripotent stem cells carrying the LRRK2‐G2019S mutation, is optimized in 3D microfluidics. The automated image analysis algorithms are implemented to enable pharmacophenomics in disease‐relevant conditions. In contrast to 2D cultures, this 3D approach reveals robust endophenotypes. High‐content imaging data show decreased dopaminergic differentiation and branching complexity, altered mitochondrial morphology, and increased cell death in LRRK2‐G2019S neurons compared to isogenic lines without using stressor agents. Treatment with the LRRK2 inhibitor 2 (Inh2) rescues LRRK2‐G2019S‐dependent dopaminergic phenotypes. Strikingly, a holistic analysis of all studied features shows that the genetic background of the PD patients, and not the LRRK2‐G2019S mutation, constitutes the strongest contribution to the phenotypes. These data support the use of advanced in vitro models for future patient stratification and personalized drug development. [less ▲]

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See detailA rare loss-of function variant of ADAM17 is associated with late-onset familial Alzheimer disease
Hartl, Daniela; May, Patrick UL; Gu, Wei UL et al

in Molecular Psychiatry (2018)

Common variants of about 20 genes contributing to AD risk have so far been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, there is still a large proportion of heritability that might ... [more ▼]

Common variants of about 20 genes contributing to AD risk have so far been identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, there is still a large proportion of heritability that might be explained by rare but functionally important variants. One of the so far identified genes with rare AD causing variants is ADAM10. Using whole-genome sequencing we now identified a single rare nonsynonymous variant (SNV) rs142946965 [p.R215I] in ADAM17 co-segregating with an autosomal-dominant pattern of late-onset AD in one family. Subsequent genotyping and analysis of available whole-exome sequencing data of additional case/control samples from Germany, the UK and the USA identified five variant carriers among AD patients only. The mutation inhibits pro-protein cleavage and the formation of the active enzyme, thus leading to loss-of-function of ADAM17 α-secretase. Further, we identified a strong negative correlation between ADAM17 and APP gene expression in human brain and present in vitro evidence that ADAM17 negatively controls the expression of APP. As a consequence, p.R215I mutation of ADAM17 leads to elevated Aß formation in vitro. Together our data supports a causative association of the identified ADAM17 variant in the pathogenesis of AD. [less ▲]

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See detailMillifluidic culture improves human midbrain organoid vitality and differentiation
Berger, Emanuel UL; Magliaro, Chiara; Paczia, Nicole UL et al

in Lab on a Chip - Miniaturisation for Chemistry and Biology (2018)

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See detailGender-specific expression of ubiquitin-specific peptidase 9 modulates tau expression and phosphorylation: possible implications for tauopathies
Köglsberger, Sandra UL; Cordero Maldonado, Maria Lorena UL; Antony, Paul UL et al

in Molecular Neurobiology (2017), 54(10), 79797993

Public transcriptomics studies have shown that several genes display pronounced gender differences in their expression in the human brain, which may influence the manifestations and risk for neuronal ... [more ▼]

Public transcriptomics studies have shown that several genes display pronounced gender differences in their expression in the human brain, which may influence the manifestations and risk for neuronal disorders. Here we apply a transcriptome-wide analysis to discover genes with gender-specific expression and significant alterations in public post mortem brain tissue from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients compared to controls. We identify the sex-linked ubiquitin specific peptidase 9 (USP9) as an outstanding candidate gene with highly significant expression differences between the genders and male-specific under-expression in AD. Since previous studies have shown that USP9 can modulate the phosphorylation of the AD-associated protein MAPT, we investigate functional associations between USP9 and MAPT in further detail. After observing a high positive correlation between the expression of USP9 and MAPT in the public transcriptomics data, we show that USP9 knockdown results in significantly decreased MAPT expression in a DU145 cell culture model and a concentration-dependent decrease for the MAPT orthologs mapta and maptb in a zebrafish model. From the analysis of microarray and qRT-PCR experiments for the knockdown in DU145 cells and prior knowledge from the literature, we derive a data-congruent model for a USP9-dependent regulatory mechanism modulating MAPT expression via BACH1 and SMAD4. Overall, the analyses suggest USP9 may contribute to molecular gender differences observed in tauopathies and provide a new target for intervention strategies to modulate MAPT expression. [less ▲]

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See detailIDENTIFICATION OF A RARE GENE VARIANT THAT IS ASSOCIATED WITH FAMILIAL ALZHEIMER DISEASE AND REGULATES APP EXPRESSION
Hartl, Daniela; May, Patrick UL; Gu, Wei UL et al

in Alzheimer's & Dementia : The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association (2017), 13(7, Supplement), 648

Background Genetic mutations leading to familial forms of Alzheimer disease (AD) have so far been reported for a few genes including APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2, UNC5C, PLD3, ABCA7, TTC3, and possibly ADAM10 ... [more ▼]

Background Genetic mutations leading to familial forms of Alzheimer disease (AD) have so far been reported for a few genes including APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2, UNC5C, PLD3, ABCA7, TTC3, and possibly ADAM10. With the advent of whole exome and whole genome sequencing approaches new genes and mutations are likely to be identified. Methods We analyzed the genetic cause of AD in a large multiplex family with an autosomal-dominant pattern of inheritance with LOAD. The family lacked pathogenic mutations of known AD genes. We performed whole-genome sequencing (WGS) in six family members (two affected and four unaffected) and prioritized rare, potential damaging, variants that segregated with disease. Variants were further characterized by subsequent molecular analyzes in human brain and cell culture models. Results We identified a single rare nonsynonymous variant co-segregating with AD. The mutation inhibits pro-protein cleavage and the formation of the active enzyme, thus leading to a loss-of-function of the gene. We further found a strong negative correlation between the identified gene and APP gene expression in human brain and in cells over-expressing the gene. The negative regulation of APP expression was only observed for the wt gene, but not for mutated forms, thus causing beside the loss of enzyme function a decoupling of both APPexpression and subsequent beta-amyloid formation. The identity of the gene will be presented on the conference. Conclusions This novel pathway strongly supports a causative association of the identified gene with the pathogenesis of AD. [less ▲]

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See detailGene Regulatory Network Inference of Immunoresponsive Gene 1 (IRG1) Identifies Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) as Its Transcriptional Regulator in Mammalian Macrophages
Antony, Paul UL; Tallam, Aravind UL; Perumal, Thanneer Malai UL et al

in PLoS ONE (2016)

Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein ... [more ▼]

Immunoresponsive gene 1 (IRG1) is one of the highest induced genes in macrophages under pro-inflammatory conditions. Its function has been recently described: it codes for immune-responsive gene 1 protein/cis-aconitic acid decarboxylase (IRG1/CAD), an enzyme catalysing the production of itaconic acid from cis-aconitic acid, a tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediate. Itaconic acid possesses specific antimicrobial properties inhibiting isocitrate lyase, the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, an anaplerotic pathway that bypasses the TCA cycle and enables bacteria to survive on limited carbon conditions. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying itaconic acid production through IRG1 induction in macrophages, we examined the transcriptional regulation of IRG1. To this end, we studied IRG1 expression in human immune cells under different inflammatory stimuli, such as TNFα and IFNγ, in addition to lipopolysaccharides. Under these conditions, as previously shown in mouse macrophages, IRG1/CAD accumulates in mitochondria. Furthermore, using literature information and transcription factor prediction models, we re-constructed raw gene regulatory networks (GRNs) for IRG1 in mouse and human macrophages. We further implemented a contextualization algorithm that relies on genome-wide gene expression data to infer putative cell type-specific gene regulatory interactions in mouse and human macrophages, which allowed us to predict potential transcriptional regulators of IRG1. Among the computationally identified regulators, siRNA-mediated gene silencing of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) in macrophages significantly decreased the expression of IRG1/CAD at the gene and protein level, which correlated with a reduced production of itaconic acid. Using a synergistic approach of both computational and experimental methods, we here shed more light on the transcriptional machinery of IRG1 expression and could pave the way to therapeutic approaches targeting itaconic acid levels. [less ▲]

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See detailCharacterization of Differentiated SH-SY5Y as Neuronal Screening Model Reveals Increased Oxidative Vulnerability
Antony, Paul UL; Forster, Julia UL; Köglsberger, Sandra UL et al

in Journal of Biomolecular Screening : The Official Journal of the Society for Biomolecular Screening (2016)

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See detailEnteric neurons from Parkinson's disease patients display ex vivo aberrations in mitochondrial structure.
Baumuratov, Aidos UL; Antony, Paul UL; Ostaszewski, Marek UL et al

in Scientific reports (2016), 6

Based on autopsy material mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed being part of the pathophysiological cascade of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, in living patients, evidence for such dysfunction ... [more ▼]

Based on autopsy material mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed being part of the pathophysiological cascade of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, in living patients, evidence for such dysfunction is scarce. As the disease presumably starts at the enteric level, we studied ganglionic and mitochondrial morphometrics of enteric neurons. We compared 65 ganglia from 11 PD patients without intestinal symptoms and 41 ganglia from 4 age-matched control subjects. We found that colon ganglia from PD patients had smaller volume, contained significantly more mitochondria per ganglion volume, and displayed a higher total mitochondrial mass relative to controls. This suggests involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in PD at the enteric level. Moreover, in PD patients the mean mitochondrial volume declined in parallel with motor performance. Ganglionic shrinking was evident in the right but not in the left colon. In contrast, mitochondrial changes prevailed in the left colon suggesting that a compensatory increase in mitochondrial mass might counterbalance mitochondrial dysfunction in the left colon but not in the right colon. Reduction in ganglia volume and combined mitochondrial morphometrics had both predictive power to discriminate between PD patients and control subjects, suggesting that both parameters could be used for early discrimination between PD patients and healthy individuals. [less ▲]

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