References of "Aleksic, Gabrijela 50002926"
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See detailExperiencing Culture in Intimate Intercultural Relationships
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Information Age Publications (2022)

I introduce the book starting by my own personal experience of growing up in a mixed family and being myself in a mixed marriage. I describe the structure of the book by building up my own method: how I ... [more ▼]

I introduce the book starting by my own personal experience of growing up in a mixed family and being myself in a mixed marriage. I describe the structure of the book by building up my own method: how I chose this topic, who were the people I interviewed, how (interviews, stories, and objects) and why was the single-but-critical instances analysis important. I focus on the richness of the interaction I had with the interviewees. I underlie the phenomenological stories of struggles, trust and vulnerability. The chapters resolve around power relations, expressing affection, in-depth communication, child rearing, conflict resolution strategies, empathy, female identity, future planning, the role of humor, the biggest cultural and linguistic challenges and opportunities. The focus is on the phenomenon captured in single-but-critical instances in participants' stories. I conclude by describing what significance culture has in intimate intercultural relationships. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 165 (8 UL)
See detailTranslanguaging program for teachers - website
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Learning material (2021)

The www.transla-program.org website is a resource of theoretical and practical materials for teachers working with multilingual children. It exists in English, French, and German.

Detailed reference viewed: 98 (2 UL)
See detailMarina pesma
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the ... [more ▼]

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the nature and a refuge in music that she shares with her teacher and classmates in the end. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (0 UL)
See detailSumak, le pêcheur et le garçon
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and ... [more ▼]

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and language codes in order to find her way. A fisherman helps her to do that. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (5 UL)
See detailSumak, the fisherman, and the boy
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and ... [more ▼]

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and language codes in order to find her way. A fisherman helps her to do that. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 189 (4 UL)
See detailMaras Lied
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the ... [more ▼]

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the nature and a refuge in music that she shares with her teacher and classmates in the end. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 23 (0 UL)
See detailSumak, ribar i dečak
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and ... [more ▼]

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and language codes in order to find her way. A fisherman helps her to do that. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 128 (3 UL)
See detailA Canção de Mara
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the ... [more ▼]

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the nature and a refuge in music that she shares with her teacher and classmates in the end. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 27 (0 UL)
See detailLa chanson de Mara
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the ... [more ▼]

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the nature and a refuge in music that she shares with her teacher and classmates in the end. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 26 (0 UL)
See detailMara's song
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the ... [more ▼]

This book is a book I wrote for preschool immigrant children who struggle with learning a new language. Mara is a girl who comes to a new country and feels isolated in the school. She finds answers in the nature and a refuge in music that she shares with her teacher and classmates in the end. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)
See detailSumak, der Fischer und der Junge
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and ... [more ▼]

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and language codes in order to find her way. A fisherman helps her to do that. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 435 (4 UL)
See detailSumak, o pescador e o menino
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Book published by Self-published (2021)

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and ... [more ▼]

This book is an illustrated book for immigrant parents who struggle to learn a new language and fit into a new country. Sumak is a woman who fled the war and is trying to understand new cultural and language codes in order to find her way. A fisherman helps her to do that. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 129 (7 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA professional development course in translanguaging: Teachers, parents and children working together.
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021, September 04)

Translanguaging pedagogy promotes deeper understanding of school subjects, increases metalinguistic awareness, affirms multilingual identities, and encourages home-school collaboration (García, 2017 ... [more ▼]

Translanguaging pedagogy promotes deeper understanding of school subjects, increases metalinguistic awareness, affirms multilingual identities, and encourages home-school collaboration (García, 2017). Given that multilingual education is mandatory In Luxembourg, our project aims to (1) offer a professional development (PD) course in translanguaging to preschool teachers, (2) involve children’s families to reinforce home-school collaboration, and (3) foster children’s cognitive, linguistic, and socio-emotional engagement in the classroom. We used a mixed-method approach: language portraits, questionnaires, and focus groups with teachers, questionnaires and interviews with parents, and a test in early literacy and numeracy in school and home language and video observations with children. During the period of six months, we delivered a 22-hour PD course that focused on the development of teachers’ multilingual classroom, home-school collaboration, information about the multilingual brain and cross-linguistic transfer, oracy and multiliteracies. We worked with 40 teachers, children in their preschools, and the children’s parents. In the final focus groups, the teachers shared that they felt more relieved that children’s home languages do not confuse them and do not hinder the learning of Luxembourgish. They saw children’s emergent multilingualism as beneficial for their learning and let them express themselves freely. In addition, they understood that translanguaging is about communication, which invited them to start using languages they did not know to better relate to the children in their class. The effect of the PD course on parents and children was also positive. Some children were more involved in learning activities when their languages were used and some parents were enthusiastic to share their language through storytelling in the classroom. García, O. (2017). Translanguaging in schools: Subiendo y Bajando, Bajando y Subiendo as afterword. Journal of Language, Identity & Education, 16(4), 256-263. doi:10.1080/15348458.2017.1329657 [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 24 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailA professional development course in translanguaging: Teachers’ beliefs and attitudes
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021, August 16)

In multilingual Luxembourg there are almost 65% of 4 year-old children who do not speak Luxembourgish, of which 28% speak Portuguese (MENJE, 2018). The new law declared multilingual early education ... [more ▼]

In multilingual Luxembourg there are almost 65% of 4 year-old children who do not speak Luxembourgish, of which 28% speak Portuguese (MENJE, 2018). The new law declared multilingual early education mandatory in 2017 with the focus on developing Luxembourgish, familiarizing children with French and valuing their home languages. Thus, our project aimed to: (1) offer a professional development (PD) course in translanguaging pedagogy for preschool teachers, (2) involve children's families to strengthen home-school collaboration, and (3) foster children's cognitive, linguistic, and socio-emotional engagement in the classroom. We employed mixed methods. With teachers we used focus groups, questionnaires, and language portraits, with parents, questionnaires and interviews, and, with children test in early literacy and numeracy in school and home language as well as video observations. The main topic of our 18-hour course (June – December 2019) was translanguaging pedagogy divided into 7 sessions with the focus on multilingual ecology, home-school collaboration, multilingual brain, and multilingual oracy and literacy. We worked with 4 groups of 38 preschool teachers, of which two groups represented two entire schools. The focus of the current presentation are the results from teacher questionnaires and focus groups, delivered before and after the professional development course. The analysis of teacher questionnaires showed that there was a significant increase in positive attitudes towards children's home languages and multilingualism in general and a significant decrease in focus on Luxembourgish only, after the course. In addition, the results from the focus groups indicated that most of the teachers realized that the inclusion of children's home languages and cultures are important for their linguistic and socio-emotional development. However, the monolingual stance towards Luxembourgish for most of the teachers remained quite firm. References: Ministry of National Education, Childhood and Youth [MENJE]. (2018). Key numbers of the national education: statistics and indicators – School year 2016-2017. Retrieved from http://www.men.public.lu/fr/actualites/publications/themes-transversaux/statistiques-analyses/chiffres-cles/index.html [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (0 UL)
Peer Reviewed
See detailTeacher education in translanguaging to achieve social justice?
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 29)

Multilingual and multicultural settings are an ever-growing reality all over the world. The potential of migrant’s multilingual and multicultural heritage can be unfolded if the citizens of the host ... [more ▼]

Multilingual and multicultural settings are an ever-growing reality all over the world. The potential of migrant’s multilingual and multicultural heritage can be unfolded if the citizens of the host country are open to it. However, immigrants are often confronted with cultural and linguistic supremacy while nationals of the host country are afraid of a loss or ‘dilution’ of their existing culture and language. The increase of multilingual and multicultural settings as well as the difficulty in overcoming this fear impelled scholars of various sciences to conduct extensive research on the issues of marginalization and cultural imperialism. Researchers in educational sciences, most notably Li Wei and Ofelia García, have opposed the linguistic and cultural hegemony in education through the promotion of translanguaging pedagogy. Translanguaging as a term describes both the natural discourse of bi- and multilingual people through the use of their entire linguistic repertoire and the pedagogy that makes use of these unique linguistic repertoires of bi- and multilingual students to foster learning, comprehension and academic achievement (Celic & Selzer, 2011; Otheguy, García, & Reid, 2015). The use of a translanguaging pedagogy in multicultural and multilingual settings proves beyond useful to disrupt linguistic hegemonies and socio-politically constructed named languages by giving bi- and multilingual students a voice and space to prosper, learn and develop their bi- and multilingual identities (García, 2019). The need of a translanguaging pedagogy becomes necessary in countries such as the small trilingual Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg. The culturally and linguistically highly diverse country with its three official languages (Luxembourgish, French, and German) sees a staggering gap between the school achievements of native and non-native children, forcing even the government to implement mandatory multilingual education in preschools (PISA, 2019). The development of Luxembourgish, familiarization of French and valorization of the home languages of the children have become an official requirement for preschool teachers since 2017. Given that 64 % of four-year olds in Luxembourg do not speak Luxembourgish at home, multiple projects and courses have launched to aid teachers in the practical application of this new law (MENJE, 2018). Thus, we developed our professional development course in translanguaging for preschool teachers in Luxembourg to support their work with multilingual children and their families. The disruption of the linguistic hegemony in Luxembourgish classrooms was implicitly carried through three distinct objectives of the project : (1) 18-hours professional development course in translanguaging to 38 preschool teachers from June to December 2019 divided into 7 sessions (multilingual ecology, home-school collaboration, multilingual brain, multilingual oracy and literacy), (2) active inclusion of children’s families to foster home-school collaboration through parents’ questionnaires and interviews and the promotion of partnerships between families and teachers in the course, and (3) support of children’s linguistic, socio-emotional and cognitive development and engagement in the classroom through early literacy and numeracy tests in the school and home languages, and video observations of classroom activities and interactions. As the goal of social justice was thematized implicitly throughout the course given that most teachers are monolingually and monoculturally biased to be confronted with the topic of cultural imperialism and linguistic hegemony head-on, we tried to assess the teachers change in attitudes through the use of focus group and questionnaires at the beginning and the end of the course. This is the present focus. As the voluntary participation in a translanguaging course would already suggest, the preliminary results of our project show an overall openness of the participating teachers towards other languages and cultures and an awareness of the need of inclusion of the home languages of the children for the benefit of their development and well-being. The results from teacher questionnaires show that there was a significant increase in positive attitudes towards multilingualism (t(35) = -3.83, p < .001) and significant decrease in exclusive interest in Luxembourgish (t(35) = 3.45, p < .001), after the course. This openness and awareness do, however, not automatically translate into social justice as only a very small number of teachers was open to the idea of disrupting linguistic hegemonies and in the video observations unconsciously put all the languages at a same level. The majority of the participants did change their views about their multilingual students (from deficit to richness) realizing that the inclusion of children’s home languages and cultures is a valuable tool for comprehension, learning and socio-emotional development instead of only being a stepping-stone until full mastery of Luxembourgish is achieved. Yet, their strong focus on the development of Luxembourgish and its absolute untouchable status as the language that receives the most recognition did not change. Beside the linguistic superiority of Luxembourgish, even linguistic hierarchies became blatantly obvious during video observations, showing just how much work still needs to be done for teachers to truly interiorize the potentially harmful consequences of linguistic hegemonies and hierarchies. It is our responsibility as researchers to continue to work with teachers, and involve parents, children, and their communities. Change in attitudes and raise of social responsibility and justice is a process. At this point of our project, we see it in fragments, and it is important for all of us not to disrupt it. If we do, the networks that we created will dissolve and the positive impact on multilingual children’s lives and their families could disappear. Therefore, we see two opportunities to continue the work on translanguaging pedagogy by: (1) organizing an additional training for teachers in which we will analyze the video observations to focus on power relations, and (2) organizing a teacher/parent conference in which we will facilitate the discussion on translanguaging pedagogy. Educational and social contexts are rapidly changing and we believe that our professional development course in translanguaging pedagogy is contributing to the process of adaptation to these changes by explicitly inviting us to be more socially responsible and fair. The Conference will give us the opportunity to present the final results and future directions of the project. References Celic, C., & Selzer, K. (2011). Translanguaging: A CUNY-NYSIEB Guide for Educators. New York: CUNY-NYSIEB. García, O. (2019). Translanguaging: a coda to the code?, Classroom Discourse, 10(3-4), 369-373, doi: 10.1080/19463014.2019.1638277 Ministry of National Education, Childhood and Youth [MENJE]. (2018). Les chiffres clés de l'Éducation nationale: statistiques et indicateurs - Année scolaire 2016-2017 [Key numbers of the national education: statistics and indicators – School year 2016-20167]. Retrieved from http://www.men.public.lu/fr/actualites/publications/themes-transversaux/statistiques-analyses/chiffres-cles/index.html OECD (2019). PISA 2018 Results (Volume I): What students know and can do. PISA, OECD Publishing: Paris. doi: https://doi.org/10.1787/5f07c754-en Otheguy, R., García, O., & Reid, W. (2015). Clarifying translanguaging and deconstructing named langauges: A perspective from linguistics. Applied Linguistic Review, 6(3), 281–307. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 19 (0 UL)
See detailResults of the project TRANSLA
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebić-Crestany, Džoen Dominique UL

Scientific Conference (2021, April 21)

In this Conference, we presented the the results from the project TRANSLA, with the focus on the teachers. According to the results from the questionnaires that were administered before and after the ... [more ▼]

In this Conference, we presented the the results from the project TRANSLA, with the focus on the teachers. According to the results from the questionnaires that were administered before and after the professional development course in translanguaging pedagogy, there was a significant increase in teachers' positive attitudes towards multilingualism and the use of children's home languages, and a significant decrease of focus on Luxembourgish only, after the course. The focus groups before and after the course and the interviews after the course showed that there was a raise of awareness of the link between implementation of home languages and children's well-being, positive change in deficit perspective of children, and positive change in attitudes (however, for some still firm monolingual stance). Finally, the teachers shared that there was a positive change in their practice (however, for some too time-consuming). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 34 (2 UL)
See detailProjects, plans and publications
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

Presentation (2021, April 20)

Presenting the TRANSLA project among others

Detailed reference viewed: 35 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMultilingual education in early years in Luxembourg: a paradigm shift?
Kirsch, Claudine UL; Aleksic, Gabrijela UL

in International Journal of Multilingualism (2021)

This paper is based in Luxembourg where a multilingual programme has been implemented in early childhood education in 2017. The research project examines the language use in daily communication and ... [more ▼]

This paper is based in Luxembourg where a multilingual programme has been implemented in early childhood education in 2017. The research project examines the language use in daily communication and literacy activities of educators and parents in day care centres, as reported by educators in two online-questionnaires. The findings show that the educators and parents use multiple languages when communicating, singing and reading with children in the centres. In addition to French and Luxembourgish which dominate, they use five other languages. Their reported multilingual practice reflects their beliefs that speaking and reading in several languages promotes language learning. However, while the programme is multilingual, a range of home languages are marginalised. The educators produce a language hierarchy in the centres which the parents reproduce. While collaboration with parents can be effective in bringing home languages into day care centres, educators need to be aware of language hierarchies and ideologies. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (6 UL)
See detailTRANSLA results 2019-2020
Aleksic, Gabrijela UL; Bebić, Džoen Dominique UL

Presentation (2021, February 26)

This was a teacher-parent Conference in which we presented the results on the effects of the translanguaging training for teachers on their pedagogy, home-school collaboration, and children's well being ... [more ▼]

This was a teacher-parent Conference in which we presented the results on the effects of the translanguaging training for teachers on their pedagogy, home-school collaboration, and children's well being. We presented the results gathered from teacher questionnaires, focus groups, and interviews with the teachers, questionnaires and interviews with the parents, and literacy and numeracy tests and video observations with the children. We found positive effects and shared it with parents and teachers. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 25 (2 UL)