References of "Albert, Isabelle 50000108"
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See detailFormer refugees’ acculturation processes and their views on newly arrived refugees in Germany
Kämmer, Jana J. L.; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Human Arenas (2023), online first

Research on the rising number of refugees migrating to Germany has seldom considered experiences of refugees who fled to Germany several years ago and went through the process of acculturation themselves ... [more ▼]

Research on the rising number of refugees migrating to Germany has seldom considered experiences of refugees who fled to Germany several years ago and went through the process of acculturation themselves. In the present study, we investigated acculturation processes of former refugees and their views on newly arrived refugees in Germany and discuss the lessons that can be learned by society and the political system from their lived experiences. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted and analyzed by using qualitative content analysis. The sample consisted of five former refugees from the countries Iran, Iraq, and Togo. The results illustrate their acculturation processes in Germany and their attempt to integrate different, sometimes opposing cultures into their everyday lives. Ambivalent opinions on the new arrivals and the integration politics in Germany in 2015/16 (the so-called “refugee crisis”) become visible. On the one hand, empathy and solidarity towards newly arriving refugees are mentioned; on the other hand, worries are expressed and demands are made of them. On the political level, the welcoming attitude is appreciated, but clear regulations are desired. The results strongly suggest that former refugees should be included, and their personal experiences of immigration should be more thoroughly considered in decision making within integration politics. [less ▲]

See detailMigration and ageing: The sense of belonging of first-generation Portuguese migrants in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2022, November 15)

The need to belong is fundamental to human beings and constitutes a basis for subjective well-being. It is closely linked to further concepts, such as identification, connectedness, attachment, fitting in ... [more ▼]

The need to belong is fundamental to human beings and constitutes a basis for subjective well-being. It is closely linked to further concepts, such as identification, connectedness, attachment, fitting in and feeling “at home”. Migration is a life transition that entails changes in social and emotional belonging. Former social network members might be left behind in the country of origin, and an important developmental task for migrants is therefore the establishment of bonds in the receiving country. As first-generation immigrants of the past decades are now close to retirement age, the question of home and belonging has become particularly pertinent also with regard to their future plans and concerning their intergenerational relations. The present contribution will focus on the sense of belonging of first generation Portuguese immigrants living in Luxembourg by drawing on data from the FNR-funded IRMA study on “Intergenerational Relations in the light of Migration and Ageing”. Selected results with regard to future plans and intergenerational relations will be presented. Further, applying the lens of cultural psychology of semiotic mediation, the development of a sense of belonging will be traced by taking a life span perspective and drawing on concepts such as proculturation and the Trajectory Equifinality Approach. [less ▲]

See detailResilience and well-being of older people in times of crisis and beyond
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2022, November 11)

Recent times have been characterized by a number of crises which can challenge the quality of life of older people. The Covid-19 pandemic, in particular, has been disruptive for social participation and ... [more ▼]

Recent times have been characterized by a number of crises which can challenge the quality of life of older people. The Covid-19 pandemic, in particular, has been disruptive for social participation and integration. While at the beginning of the pandemic, the sanitary measures were at the foreground and most effort was focused on containing the virus, it became soon clear that secondary effects of social distancing were putting at risk the subjective well-being and mental health of people around the globe. Older people were particularly concerned by social distancing measures as they were regarded a vulnerable group, irrespective of their heterogeneity. Social engagement is a main pillar of successful ageing (Rowe & Kahn, 2015) but opportunities for social activities and connectedness with others have been undermined during the pandemic. Interestingly and contrary to expectations, initial studies have shown that older people fared on average better than feared in the early months of the pandemic as they could draw on resources and resilience built over a life time. However, prolonged times of inactivity and social isolation can take a toll on mental and physical health of those older people who find it difficult to reconnect with others and to participate in social activities. In my talk, I will present findings from the FNR-funded CRISIS project on older people during the pandemic regarding “Correlates of Resilience In the context of Social Isolation in Seniors” as well as from the PAN-VAL project on active ageing in the context of cultural diversity in Luxembourg which was funded by the Ministry of Family and Integration, and I will make reference to the importance of intergenerational relations for the subjective well-being of (older) family members. In light of present and future societal challenges, I will finally discuss how geropsychology can make a contribution to ensure the quality of life of older people. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Sense of belonging in the context of migration: Development and trajectories regarding Portuguese migrants in Luxembourg
Afonso, Joyce D.; Barros, Stephanie; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2022), online first

The sense of belonging can be defined as a highly subjective and dynamic feeling of acceptance, inclusion, and connectedness to a specific contextual entity. Perceiving belongingness to others is ... [more ▼]

The sense of belonging can be defined as a highly subjective and dynamic feeling of acceptance, inclusion, and connectedness to a specific contextual entity. Perceiving belongingness to others is positively related to psychological well-being, happiness, or higher self-esteem. The present contribution examined how the sense of belonging to spatial, social, and cultural entities evolves over the migration process of Portuguese first-generation migrants and their second-generation offspring residing in Luxembourg. The current study drew on the qualitative content analysis of ten semi-structured interviews, carried out with ten Portuguese migrant family dyads (one parent and one adult child per dyad). The results affirmed that the sense of belonging showed to be a complex and multi-faceted concept and highly shaped by specific contexts. The initially unfamiliar Luxembourgish context became a familiar setting and even a “home” over time. While the older generation presented noticeable belongingness to Luxembourg as a homeland, their affiliation to the Luxembourgish community and culture remained rather low. Simultaneously, they preserved a high connectedness to the Portuguese culture as well as to fellow Portuguese migrants living in the Grand Duchy. The younger generation expressed a much more pronounced attachment to Luxembourg, since they perceived belongingness to the Luxembourgish spatial, social, and (multi)cultural milieu. In addition to this, a certain affiliation to the Portuguese culture and language could be discerned. Although some factors, which might have contributed to this evolution, could be identified in the present study, one can assume that there are significantly more that have not been addressed yet. [less ▲]

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See detailIntegration of young migrants in Luxembourg: A focus on social identity and intergroup processes
Albert, Isabelle UL; Gilodi, Amalia UL; Oliveira, José UL et al

Scientific Conference (2022, August 26)

In the past years, more and more young migrants from third countries have arrived to Europe. While the economies of ageing European societies can profit from an influx of young people in their labour ... [more ▼]

In the past years, more and more young migrants from third countries have arrived to Europe. While the economies of ageing European societies can profit from an influx of young people in their labour market, the integration of young third-country nationals poses also challenges both to individuals and societies. The integration of young migrants is a dynamic process that encompasses developmental and adaptive processes at multiple levels and over time. In particular young migrants in vulnerable conditions might be at risk for social exclusion. In order to understand the factors that foster or hinder integration, it is therefore particularly important to analyze the ingroup-outgroup processes involved here from a societal, institutional and individual perspective. The present study is part of the larger EU-funded H2020 MIMY project (EMpowerment through liquid Integration of Migrant Youth in vulnerable conditions) which involves 13 multinational and interdisciplinary partners to study the integration processes of young non-EU migrants across 9 countries (Luxembourg, Germany, United Kingdom, Sweden, Norway, Italy, Poland, Romania, and Hungary). The MIMY project applies a mixed methods approach, including secondary data analysis as well as qualitative data from young migrants and their parents, from host society nationals and stakeholders through narrative, biographical and expert interviews as well as focus groups. For the present contribution, we will concentrate on qualitative data collected in Luxembourg. More precisely, drawing on focus group interviews regarding the challenges and resources in the integration processes of migrant youth, we will analyze here the ingroup-outgroup processes as described by migrant youth themselves as well as by migrant parents of adolescents/emerging adults living in Luxembourg. We will in particular identify processes of social identity, intergroup attitudes and patterns of social contact. Thereby, a special focus will be put on the experiences of social inclusion/exclusion and host societal attitudes toward migrants as experienced by our study participants. Our results will be discussed in relation to current integration policies, and ideas for an improvement of the situation of young migrants in Luxembourg and Europe will be formulated. [less ▲]

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See detailUniversity students’ friendship networks: Ambivalence and the role of attachment and personality
Schwind, Lena; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Trends in Psychology (2022), online first

Given the importance of friendships throughout the life span and the possible experience of ambivalence within these relationships, the present study aims at examining the role that attachment and ... [more ▼]

Given the importance of friendships throughout the life span and the possible experience of ambivalence within these relationships, the present study aims at examining the role that attachment and personality dimensions may play in this experience. University students (N = 87) completed an online survey, including the Big Five Inventory-10 (BFI-10), the Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ), as well as a two-item scale and an emotion checklist as two measures of ambivalence towards their friends. The correlation analysis revealed significant correlations between the ambivalence measures and secure attachment, fearful attachment, neuroticism, and agreeableness. A subsequent regression analysis demonstrated that fearful attachment, neuroticism, agreeableness, and gender can explain a considerable amount of variation in the degree of ambivalence. The results indicate that both certain attachment dimensions and certain personality dimensions predict the experience of ambivalence, although their importance may vary depending on the object of ambivalence. [less ▲]

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See detailMulticultural conviviality in the context of active ageing in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Vandenbosch, Petra et al

Scientific Conference (2022, June)

Luxembourg’s population has not only become more culturally diverse in the past years but is also growing older. Almost 20 per cent of the total population of Luxembourg is over 60 years old, of which one ... [more ▼]

Luxembourg’s population has not only become more culturally diverse in the past years but is also growing older. Almost 20 per cent of the total population of Luxembourg is over 60 years old, of which one third are non-Luxembourgers. Active ageing can make an important contribution to the quality of life of older people and promote social inclusion, whereas the feeling of not belonging can be a psychological barrier to participation in activities. This was the starting point of the PAN-VAL project on active ageing of Luxembourgers and non-Luxembourgers, which was funded by the Luxembourg Ministry of Family and Integration and carried out in collaboration between a team from the University of Luxembourg and GERO – Kompetenzzenter fir den Alter. A total of N = 1000 people over 50 (51% women, 49% men) participated in a nationally representative online and telephone survey, and a number of n = 39 in-depth qualitative interviews were carried out with participants from four selected municipalities in different parts of the Grand Duchy: Differdange in the south, Mersch in the centre and Ettelbrück and Clervaux in the north. Based on our quantitative data, we will first present a model on the relations between sense of belonging, social inclusion, loneliness and participation in social activities. Drawing on our qualitative interviews, we will further analyze how the participants describe the processes how they developed a sense of belonging to the places they live in through mundane encounters with people from their municipalities and neighborhoods. We will also explore, how older people experience conviviality with regard to the offers for active ageing, focusing in particular on barriers and facilitators for participation in such offers. Policy implications and lessons learnt about how to adapt social offers to the diverse needs of an increasingly heterogeneous target group will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailAging under the lens of culture - Universal and specific perspectives
Albert, Isabelle UL

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2022), 35(2), 51-53

Population aging is a phenomenon not restricted to Western societies but observed the world over. Currently, according to estimates by the United Nations, 727 million persons are aged 65 years or older ... [more ▼]

Population aging is a phenomenon not restricted to Western societies but observed the world over. Currently, according to estimates by the United Nations, 727 million persons are aged 65 years or older worldwide, and by 2050 these numbers will have increased to over 1.5 billion, so that by midcentury one in six persons will be 65 years or older (UN, 2020). Interestingly, while some European countries (such as Germany and Italy) and Japan were among the first to take note of their aging population, large increases in the share of older people in their populations are expected for many other countries around the globe in the coming years, especially in Eastern and Southeastern Asia (UN, 2020). Population aging is thus clearly a global trend, although high variability still exists regarding life expectancies and living conditions. What is not yet fully understood is how experiences of aging are similar or differ across cultures, as aging research draws still mostly on findings from North American and Western European cultures (Fung, 2013). Many societies are not only becoming older but also more culturally diverse, and at the same time, globalization is bringing people from different cultural contexts closer to formerly lesser-known realities. The need is therefore increasing to determine the universals of aging across cultures and societies and to explain culture-specific differences (Albert & Tesch-Römer, 2019). The focus on developmental tasks prevalent in most cultural contexts could shed light on the different ways people use to tackle specific challenges in older age according to the sociocultural contexts in their living environment (Fung & Jiang, 2016). Different developmental pathways could thus channel development over the whole lifespan, and culturally formed experiences could accumulate until later life (Greenfield et al., 2003; Valsiner, 1996). That is the starting point of the present special issue on the nexus of aging and culture. Central questions are: How is subjective well-being regulated within the context of cultural diversity? How are care and assistance negotiated in non-Western contexts and how can the notion of culture be conceptualized and applied empirically? [less ▲]

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See detailVulnerability in the Context of Migration: a Critical Overview and a New Conceptual Model
Gilodi, Amalia UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

in Human Arenas (2022)

The notion of “vulnerability” occupies a central role in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates, and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its popularity has led some academics and ... [more ▼]

The notion of “vulnerability” occupies a central role in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates, and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its popularity has led some academics and practitioners to use “vulnerability” as a self-explanatory condition or phenomenon. However, a common and systematic understanding of the concept is still missing, and the moral and political meaning often ascribed to this notion may have (un)intended detrimental consequences for those migrants deemed vulnerable. Thus, this paper sets out to critically unpack and highlight the complexities hidden behind this notion in order to provide a conceptual analysis of vulnerability in the context of migration. We do so by (1) providing an overview of definitions of vulnerability across different fields of research, (2) identifying common conceptualizations or types of vulnerability and discussing their implications, and (3) highlighting possible negative societal and psychological consequences of its implementation in the context of migration. Finally, we propose (4) a new conceptual model for understanding vulnerability in the context of migration, showing how this notion can become a useful analytical tool in migration research. [less ▲]

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See detailAktives Altern und soziales Engagement in Zeiten der Pandemie
Albert, Isabelle UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2022)

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See detailIntergenerationality in the light of indeterminacy
Boulanger, Dany; Albert, Isabelle UL; Abbey, Emily

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2022), 56(1),

This Special Issue aims to shed light on the undetermined nature of intergenerational trajectories. Indeterminacy has been suggested to the author as an avenue to tackle the dynamic aspect –which entails ... [more ▼]

This Special Issue aims to shed light on the undetermined nature of intergenerational trajectories. Indeterminacy has been suggested to the author as an avenue to tackle the dynamic aspect –which entails looking at tensions in an unfolding process— of intergenerationality. We present the paper in this Special Issue by insisting on their main contributions, we identify HOW they define the concept of generation, particularly in reference to indeterminacy. [less ▲]

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See detailSubjective age, worry and risk-related perceptions in older adults in times of a pandemic
Tingvold, Maiken UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine et al

in PLoS ONE (2022)

During the Covid-19 pandemic, older people have been in the spotlight of the public debate. Given their higher risk of severe outcomes of the disease, they have been described as especially vulnerable and ... [more ▼]

During the Covid-19 pandemic, older people have been in the spotlight of the public debate. Given their higher risk of severe outcomes of the disease, they have been described as especially vulnerable and as a burden to others and society. We thus wanted to investigate how older people’s perception of their own age, that is their subjective age, as well as their Covid-19 related risks and worries were related during the pandemic and whether these relationships varied according to participants’ subjective health. We used data from the longitudinal CRISIS study which was conducted in the Grand-Duchy of Luxembourg in June and October 2020. Participants were aged 60–98 and responded on questionnaires regarding their subjective age, worry of falling ill with Covid-19, perceived risk of contracting the virus, perceived risk of falling seriously ill if they contracted Covid-19, as well as their subjective health and covariates. Three cross-lagged panel models were constructed to explore the longitudinal, bidirectional relationships between the variables. Cross-sectionally, a higher subjective age was related to more perceived risk of a serious course of disease. Longitudinally, subjective age and worry did not show any significant association over time, and neither did subjective age and perceived risk of contracting the virus. However, subjective health significantly moderated the relationship of worry and subjective age, showing different trajectories in the relationship depending on whether subjective health was good or bad. Higher perceived risk of falling seriously ill increased subjective age over time. Again, subjective health moderated this relationship: the perceived risk of falling seriously ill affected subjective age only for those with better subjective health. Our findings show the interactive relationship between subjective age and Covid-19 related cognitions and emotions and provide guidance for identifying older people that are most susceptible for negative age-related communication during the pandemic. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Corona Pandemic and Its Implications for the Mental Health and Mental Healthcare of Older Adults
Albert, Isabelle UL; Kornadt, Anna Elena UL

in GeroPsych: Journal of Gerontopsychology and Geriatric Psychiatry (2022), 35(1),

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See detailAktives Altern im Kontext kultureller Vielfalt in Luxemburg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Vandenbosch, Petra et al

Report (2021)

Ausgangspunkt des PAN-VAL Projekts „Aktives Altern in Luxemburg“, das in enger Zusammenarbeit zwischen der Universität Luxemburg und GERO durchgeführt wurde, war die Frage, inwieweit soziale Aktivitäten ... [more ▼]

Ausgangspunkt des PAN-VAL Projekts „Aktives Altern in Luxemburg“, das in enger Zusammenarbeit zwischen der Universität Luxemburg und GERO durchgeführt wurde, war die Frage, inwieweit soziale Aktivitäten und Angebote von einer diversen Population genutzt werden. In der Studie wurden die Bedürfnisse und Erwartungen von Menschen über 50 (Luxemburger*innen und Nicht-Luxemburger*innen) in Bezug auf ihre sozialen Netzwerke, ihr soziales Eingebundensein, ihre Freizeitaktivitäten innerhalb ihrer Gemeinde und ihr Zugehörigkeitsgefühl sowie ihre Zufriedenheit mit verschiedenen Lebensbereichen untersucht. Gleichzeitig zielte die Studie darauf ab, zu ermitteln, welche Faktoren eine Teilnahme begünstigen und was Menschen daran hindert, an öffentlichen Freizeitangeboten teilzunehmen. In der vorliegenden Broschüre werden die wichtigsten Ergebnisse der quantitativen und der qualitativen Teilstudien zusammengeführt sowie im Anschluss daran Hinweise für die Gestaltung von Angeboten gegeben. Hierbei werden Module präsentiert, um ältere Menschen mit Migrationshintergrund besser einzubeziehen und Dienstleistungen für ein aktives Altern einer immer diverseren Zielgruppe zu entwickeln. Die Broschüre richtet sich damit an alle, die sich mit der Gestaltung von Angeboten für soziale Aktivitäten – für Ältere, aber nicht nur – im Kontext kultureller Diversität befassen. [less ▲]

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See detailLe vieillissement actif dans le contexte de la diversité culturelle au Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Vandenbosch, Petra et al

Report (2021)

Le point de départ du projet PAN-VAL « Vieillissement actif au Luxembourg », qui a été mené à bien en collaboration étroite avec l’Université du Luxembourg et GERO, était la question de savoir dans quelle ... [more ▼]

Le point de départ du projet PAN-VAL « Vieillissement actif au Luxembourg », qui a été mené à bien en collaboration étroite avec l’Université du Luxembourg et GERO, était la question de savoir dans quelle mesure les activités sociales et les offres sont utilisées par une population diversifiée. Dans le cadre de cette étude, les besoins et les attentes de personnes de plus de 50 ans (Luxembourgeois(es) et non-Luxembourgeois(es)) ont été étudiés en ce qui concerne leurs réseaux sociaux, leur intégration sociale, leurs activités de loisir au sein de leur communauté et leur sentiment d’appartenance ainsi que leur satisfaction avec divers domaines de la vie. En même temps, l’objectif de l’étude était de déterminer quels facteurs favorisent une participation et ce qui empêche les personnes de participer aux offres de loisirs publiques. Dans la brochure présente ont été réunis les résultats les plus importants des études partielles quantitatives et qualitatives suivis d’indications pour l’organisation d’off res. On y présentera des éléments afin de mieux intégrer les personnes âgées issues de l’immigration et de mettre au point des services pour un vieillissement actif d’un groupe cible toujours plus diversifié. Ainsi, cette brochure s’adresse à tous ceux qui s’occupent de l’organisation d’offres pour des activités sociales – pour personnes âgées, mais pas uniquement – dans le contexte de la diversité culturelle. [less ▲]

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See detailCorrelates of resilience of older people in times of crisis
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Murdock, Elke UL et al

in Innovation in Aging (2021, November), 5(S 1), 723

Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, efforts have been made to shield older adults from exposure to the virus due to an age-related higher risk for severe health outcomes. While a reduction of in ... [more ▼]

Since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic, efforts have been made to shield older adults from exposure to the virus due to an age-related higher risk for severe health outcomes. While a reduction of in-person contacts was necessary in particular during the first months of the pandemic, concerns about the immediate and longer-term secondary effects of these measures on subjective well-being were raised. In the present study, we focused on self-reported resilience of older people in a longitudinal design to examine risk and protective factors in dealing with the restrictions. Data from independently living people aged 60+ in Luxembourg were collected via a telephone/online survey after the first lockdown in June (N = 611) and September/October 2020 (N = 523), just before the second pandemic wave made restrictions necessary again. Overall, results showed an increase in life-satisfaction from T1 to T2, although life-satisfaction was still rated slightly lower than before the crisis. Also, about a fifth of participants indicated at T2 difficulties to recover from the crisis. Participants who reported higher resilience to deal with the Covid-19 crisis at T2 showed higher self-efficacy, agreed more strongly with measures taken by the country and felt better informed about the virus. In contrast, participants who reported more difficulties in dealing with the pandemic, indicated reduced social contacts to family and friends at T2, and also felt lonelier. Results will be discussed applying a life-span developmental and systemic perspective on risk and protective factors in dealing with the secondary impacts of the pandemic. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring the Relationship Between Subjective Age and Worry for Older Adults in Times of a Pandemic
Tingvold, Maiken UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Murdock, Elke UL et al

in Innovation in Aging (2021, November), 5(Supplement_1), 593-593

Given the role of age as a risk factor in the covid pandemic, we examined the longitudinal cross-lagged relationship between subjective age and Covid-related worry, and possible moderators of this ... [more ▼]

Given the role of age as a risk factor in the covid pandemic, we examined the longitudinal cross-lagged relationship between subjective age and Covid-related worry, and possible moderators of this relationship. Data were obtained at two-time points (June and October 2020) by a phone/online survey, from N = 611 older participants (Mage = 69.92 years). Participants felt on average 10 and 8.5 years younger than their chronological ages at the two-time points, respectively. Younger subjective age at T1 increased the level of worry at T2 irrespective of age, perceived control and subjective health. Higher worry increased subjective age at T2, but only for those with worse subjective health. Our results show that subjective age and Covid-related worry interact over time. This relation needs to be explored further in order to understand the relationship between subjective age and well-being especially, but not only in the pandemic context. [less ▲]

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