References of "Albert, Isabelle 50000108"
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See detailIntergenerational Value Similarity in Adulthood
Hoellger, Christian; Sommer, Sabrina; Albert, Isabelle UL et al

in Journal of Family Issues (2020)

This investigation concentrates on value similarity between parents and their children during adulthood. The interplay between gender, age, relationship quality, and frequency of contact on value ... [more ▼]

This investigation concentrates on value similarity between parents and their children during adulthood. The interplay between gender, age, relationship quality, and frequency of contact on value similarity was analyzed. A total of 600 adult German children (53.8% women) and their parents took part in a questionnaire study. Value orientation was measured with a short version of Schwartz’s Portrait Values Questionnaire, and relationship quality with the Network of Relationships Inventory (Furman & Buhrmeister, 1992).Value similarity was higher in mother–daughter dyads compared to mother–son dyads, but in the other dyads, no significant differences were found. Regarding relationship quality, verbal intimacy was not related to value similarity. Parental satisfaction was associated with value similarity in the father–child dyads. Satisfaction, as perceived by adult children, was linked to value similarity in mother–child and father–son dyads. Furthermore, the frequency of contact related to value similarity between mothers and sons. [less ▲]

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See detailGerontagogy Toward Intergenerationality: Dialogical Learning Between Children and Elders
Boulanger, Dany; Albert, Isabelle UL; Marsico, Giuseppina

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2020), 54

This paper aims at overcoming the following limits of gerontagogy –particularly with regard to Lemieux’s model: referencing chronological age; delimitating elders’ learning in reference to traits (styles ... [more ▼]

This paper aims at overcoming the following limits of gerontagogy –particularly with regard to Lemieux’s model: referencing chronological age; delimitating elders’ learning in reference to traits (styles, needs, behaviors, etc.) in contrast to children’s learning; overlooking the aging aspect. To do so, we propose to integrate aging and intergenerationality into gerontagogy from a sociocultural, dialogical and historical approach. This establishes the basis for an intergenerational and dialogical approach to elders’ learning. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerationale Familiensolidarität
Albert, Isabelle UL

Presentation (2020, April 02)

Dieser Vortag geschäftigt sich mit intergenerationalen Familienbeziehungen. Im ersten Teil wird das Konzept der Generation sowie Konzepte zur Beschreibung von intergenerationalen Familienbeziehungen ... [more ▼]

Dieser Vortag geschäftigt sich mit intergenerationalen Familienbeziehungen. Im ersten Teil wird das Konzept der Generation sowie Konzepte zur Beschreibung von intergenerationalen Familienbeziehungen (Solidarität, Ambivalenz, Konflikt) eingeführt. Im zweiten Teil werden ausgewählte Ergebnisse aus einem Forschungsprojekt zu erwachsenen Kind-Eltern-Beziehungen im Kontext von Migration dargestellt. [less ▲]

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See detailExploring Cultural Identity in a Multicultural Context—the Special Case of Luxembourg
Bichler, Samantha; Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL et al

in Human Arenas (2020), online first

In light of globalization and increased cultural diversity, the question of cultural identity becomes particularly salient in many societies today. Whereas most studies have concentrated on cultural ... [more ▼]

In light of globalization and increased cultural diversity, the question of cultural identity becomes particularly salient in many societies today. Whereas most studies have concentrated on cultural identity of immigrants, less is known about the identity constructions of non-immigrants and receiving country nationals living in a multicultural setting. The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg with a foreign population of 48% provides an excellent example case here. The present study examined the cultural identity of two generations of native Luxembourgers, drawing on a content analysis of qualitative interviews with N = 18 participants belonging to nine family dyads, each composed of one (young) adult child and one parent. As Luxembourg’s cultural diversity has increased continuously in the last decades, we focussed here on similarities and differences between (young) adults and their parents in order to find out in how far age (i.e., different points in the individual life span) or generation (i.e., growing up in different times and historical contexts) might be highlighted in their cultural identity constructions. Five main domains pertaining to Luxembourger’s cultural identity were found through qualitative content analysis: ‘the Luxembourgish language’, ‘Belongingness to Luxembourg and the love for Luxembourg as a homeland’, ‘Europeanization and multiculturalism in Luxembourg’, ‘Representing Luxembourg as a native in international contexts’ and ‘Luxembourgish traditions and history’. While the older generation focused more on the feeling of belongingness to their home country, the younger generation made more specific links to Europe and multiculturalism. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailFamiliale Generationsbeziehungen (international)
Albert, Isabelle UL; Schwarz, Beate; Mayer, Boris et al

in Ecarius, Jutta; Schierbaum, Anja (Eds.) Handbuch Familie: Bildung, Erziehung und sozialpädagogische Arbeitsfelder (2020)

Der vorliegende Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit intergenerationalen Familienbeziehungen im Kulturvergleich. Nach einer Einführung in grundlegende theoretische Modelle und Forschungstraditionen werden im ... [more ▼]

Der vorliegende Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit intergenerationalen Familienbeziehungen im Kulturvergleich. Nach einer Einführung in grundlegende theoretische Modelle und Forschungstraditionen werden im zweiten Teil Forschungsprojekte und -ergebnisse zur Ausgestaltung von Generationsbeziehungen in verschiedenen kulturellen Kontexten und im Zusammenhang mit Migration aufgezeigt sowie die Bedeutung von gesellschaftlichen Rahmenbedingungen für die Ausgestaltung von familiären Generationsbeziehungen dargelegt. [less ▲]

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See detailLiving In-Between or Within? Cultural Identity Profiles of Second-Generation Young Adults with Immigrant Background
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Identity (2020), 20(4), 290-305

Migration flows have generally led to an increase in questions about the multiple influences on people’s cultural identity. This study aims to examine more closely the ways in which second-generation ... [more ▼]

Migration flows have generally led to an increase in questions about the multiple influences on people’s cultural identity. This study aims to examine more closely the ways in which second-generation individuals of Portuguese descent juggle a two-fold cultural environment. We opted for a person-centered approach with a sample of N = 70 adults, all from Portuguese immigrant families living in the Grand-duchy of Luxembourg. Results yielded three different bicultural profiles: blended, alternating bicultural, and a new ambivalent cultural identity profile. Our results distinguish between psychological markers of identity and the behavioral aspects necessary for the transition from one cultural framework to the other. In addition, we observed different patterns of psychosocial health among the four cultural identity profiles. Our research enriches the literature by highlighting different endorsement of regulatory control strategies of second-generation adults according to their cultural identity profile, with different psychological outcomes. [less ▲]

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See detail“I Feel More Luxembourgish, but Portuguese Too” Cultural Identities in a Multicultural Society
Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Integrative Psychological and Behavioral Science (2020), 54

The present investigation focused on cultural identity and the dealing with the belonging to different cultural frames as a migrant in a highly culturally diverse context by comparing two generations of ... [more ▼]

The present investigation focused on cultural identity and the dealing with the belonging to different cultural frames as a migrant in a highly culturally diverse context by comparing two generations of Portuguese families living in Luxembourg. Quantitative standardized questionnaires complemented by in-depth qualitative interviews with parent-child dyads were used in order to assess possible (dis)similarities between first generation Portuguese immigrant parents and their adult children (i.e. second generation) concerning their cultural identities. Generational differences were found regarding the dealing with several cultural frames, language competences and attachment to both discussed cultures. Adult children were more prone to find themselves in a “compatible” identity orientation, compared to the parental generation. Yet, when focussing specifically on the second generation, qualitative data highlighted some issues regarding the perceived views of others on one’s own cultural belonging and the perception of a certain sense of cultural identity denial from others. Our findings contribute to the existing theoretical literature on cultural identity by elucidating some major differences between immigrant parents and their adult children on how they enact the sense of belonging and the dealing with multiple cultural frames on a daily-life basis. [less ▲]

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See detail“That’s a value I would transmit in some way, but how concretely, I don’t know” – Intergenerational value transfer revisited in light of memory
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros, Stephanie; Boulanger, Dany

in Wagoner, Brady; Bresco, I.; Zadeh, S. (Eds.) Memory in the Wild (2020)

Intergenerational value transmission occurs widely and to a large extent within the family as primary socialization agent. In families, children are confronted with specific practices, paradigms, rules ... [more ▼]

Intergenerational value transmission occurs widely and to a large extent within the family as primary socialization agent. In families, children are confronted with specific practices, paradigms, rules and routines which are part of their family culture (Albert & Barros Coimbra, 2017) and as such family is a mediator between societal/cultural and individual values. The ability to transmit values is essential for collective knowledge and memory, the continuity of value orientations being a main feature of intergenerational relations that enables members of different generations to communicate with each other (Barni, Rosnati, & Ranieri, 2013; Halbwachs, 1941/1992; Schönpflug, 2001). Intergenerational transmission of values becomes particularly complex in the context of migration or in times of rapid social change. On the one hand, family identity and traditions might provide a secure base in light of a changing context, and parents might find it important to transmit traditional values to the next generation in order to keep memories alive. At the same time, they might feel that their children should adapt to the changed cultural context, resulting in a (not always clear) dilemma about what they want for their children. How can migrant parents reconcile or move between the different collective frameworks of their culture of origin and the receiving culture (Middleton & Brown, 2005)? In the following, we will first give a brief overview over research in the area of intergenerational value transmission, and we will second illustrate and further inform our theoretical assumptions by identifying related themes and phenomena in our qualitative dyadic interviews. Then, we will delve into memory as a horizon that is emerging out of the analysis as a transversal theme. From this point of view, we continue the analysis and progressively integrate the notions pertaining to the role of memory in the intergenerational transmission of values. Aspects of cultural background are apparent in the excerpts that we will quote supporting the themes we will refer to. We will more explicitly return to this in our conclusions. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerationale Familienbeziehungen im Übergang und Ambivalenzerfahrungen zwischen jungen Erwachsenen und ihren Eltern
Albert, Isabelle UL

in angewandte Forschung: Magazin für Psychogerontologie und Entwicklung über die Lebensspanne (2020), 6(Frühjahr),

Der Auszug der erwachsenen Kinder aus dem Elternhaus stellt für Eltern und junge Erwachsene gleichermaßen eine Transition in der Lebensspanne dar, die eine Regulation der familiären Beziehungen ... [more ▼]

Der Auszug der erwachsenen Kinder aus dem Elternhaus stellt für Eltern und junge Erwachsene gleichermaßen eine Transition in der Lebensspanne dar, die eine Regulation der familiären Beziehungen erforderlich macht und somit eine wichtige Familienentwicklungsaufgabe darstellt. Eltern sehen sich mit einer „empty nest“-Situation konfrontiert und mitunter kann sich das Loslassen für die Eltern als schwierig erweisen (Perrig-Chiello, 2014). Gerade im Jugend- und jungen Erwachsenenalter wird jedoch eine Anpassung der Beziehungen hin zu mehr Autonomie erforderlich, wohingegen Kontrolle und Einmischen seitens der Eltern zunehmend negativ erlebt wird. Insbesondere können sich hier unterschiedliche Zielsetzungen in den Beziehungen zwischen den Eltern und ihren erwachsenen Kindern ergeben, die mit dem Begriff des „intergenerational stake“ von Bengtson und Kollegen eingehend beschrieben wurden – junge Erwachsene streben einerseits nach Autonomie und Selbständigkeit, deren Eltern andererseits nach Kontinuität in den Beziehungen. Gleichzeitig bleiben Eltern für junge Erwachsene eine wichtige Quelle der Unterstützung und eine stabile Eltern-Kind-Beziehung bildet die Grundlage für eine gelungene Individuation (Buhl, 2003). Die Aushandlung der beiden fundamentalen Bedürfnisse nach Autonomie und Verbundenheit kennzeichnet Eltern-Kind-Beziehungen also ein Leben lang (Albert & Barros, 2017; Trommsdorff, 2006; Rothbaum & Trommsdorff, 2007). Was bedeuten diese widerstreitenden Tendenzen nun für die Qualität der Eltern-Kind-Beziehungen und insbesondere für das Erleben von Ambivalenz? Wie verändern sich die Eltern-Kind-Beziehungen mit dem Auszug aus dem Elternhaus? Diesen Fragen ist eine Studie an der Universität Luxemburg nachgegangen. Die Studie beschäftigte sich unter anderem mit den Ambivalenzerfahrungen junger Erwachsener und der Rolle des Auszugs aus dem Elternhaus. Befragt wurden junge Erwachsene im Alter zwischen 17 und 30 Jahren. [less ▲]

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See detailDie Corona-Pandemie und die ältere Bevölkerung: Psychologische Aspekte
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Boll, Thomas UL

in Mein, Georg; Pause, Johannes (Eds.) Self and Society in the Corona Crisis. Perspectives from the Humanities and Social Sciences (2020)

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See detailEditorial - Psychology and Aging: European Perspectives
Lang, Frieder R.; Albert, Isabelle UL; Kliegel, Matthias

in European Psychologist (2020), 25(3), 159-161

What does it mean to get older and eventually become an older citizen when residing in Europe? How do individuals deal with the challenges that result from health-related issues, novel cognitive demands ... [more ▼]

What does it mean to get older and eventually become an older citizen when residing in Europe? How do individuals deal with the challenges that result from health-related issues, novel cognitive demands, developmental tasks, and societal changes? How can societies offer the context for a good life to individuals, who have lived beyond their sixth decade of life, and may still have more than four decades to go? Research on aging does not point to just one other field of psychological science that one may consider as topical. In all, the five contributions to this special issue provide a rich and instructive compilation of articles that point to the potentials of aging research in basic and applied psychology. The diversity of these articles may also give an idea of the contributions and insights that can be gained from geropsychological work in psychology. This special issue has been a joint initiative of a longstanding network on geropsychology that has been established on the premises of EFPA. [less ▲]

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See detailThe paradoxical effect of social support on suicidial ideation in bullying involvement in different cultural contexts
Weitzel, Leslie UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Journal of child and adolescent behaviour (2020), 8(1), 1-11

This study examined the buffering effect of perceived social support on the association between bullying involvement and suicidal ideation. Cultural differences between Luxembourgish and Indian students ... [more ▼]

This study examined the buffering effect of perceived social support on the association between bullying involvement and suicidal ideation. Cultural differences between Luxembourgish and Indian students were explored as well. The Olweus Bullying Questionnaire, the Participant Role Behaviour Questionnaire, and the Child and Adolescent Social Support Scale were used. Data of 483 high school students aged between 12 and 18 years were analysed using hierarchical regression. Significant cultural differences between Luxembourg and India in bullying involvement, perceived social support and suicidal ideation occurred. Importantly, it was found that perceived social support did not play a buffering role, but instead highly perceived social support from a close friend intensified the relationship between high cyber- and relational victimization and suicidal ideation. [less ▲]

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See detailDevelopment across the life span and (Cross-)Cultural Psychology
Albert, Isabelle UL

Presentation (2019, October 21)

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See detailINTERGENERATIONAL VALUE TRANSMISSION AND THE ROLE OF MOTIVATIONAL PROCESSES IN MIGRANT AND NON-MIGRANT FAMILIES
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros, Stephanie; Coimbra, Susana

Scientific Conference (2019, September 01)

The intergenerational transmission of values from one generation to the next is essential for the continuity of a society as it facilitates communication between members of different generations and ... [more ▼]

The intergenerational transmission of values from one generation to the next is essential for the continuity of a society as it facilitates communication between members of different generations and within families, where shared values constitute a part of the family identity. In the context of acculturation, traditions can provide a secure base for migrants who have to adapt to a new living context. On the one hand, parents in migrant families might find it particularly important to transmit traditional values to the next generation, on the other hand offspring can be confronted with diverse value orientations in the receiving culture, and therefore special efforts might be needed to transmit traditional values. The current study is part of the larger FNR-funded IRMA project and presents a crosscultural comparison of n = 154 triads of parents and their (young) adult children from Luxembourgish native and Portuguese immigrant families in Luxembourg, as well as a subsample of Portuguese families living in Portugal. Participants from both generations filled out a standardized questionnaire assessing general value orientations, perceived value similarity as well as parental motivation to transmit respectively children’s motivation to take over parental values. Results showed that parental motivation to transmit values was particularly high in Portuguese families (in Portugal and Luxembourg), although no differences in perceived value similarity between the three subsamples occurred. Whereas parental motivation for transmission was related to the value of tradition in all three subsamples, perceived similarity between parents and their adult children was related to their selforiented values. Concerning consensus in value profiles, the role of motivational processes will be further explored, and effects of culture and migration will be discussed in an integrative framework of intergenerational relations in light of migration and ageing. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: INTERGENERATIONAL VALUE TRANSMISSION: THE ROLE OF MOTIVES, TRANSITIONS, AND CONTEXT
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2019, September 01)

Cultural transmission refers to the transfer of knowledge, practices, values and norms through processes of socialization, enculturation and acculturation which can be intentional or implicit ... [more ▼]

Cultural transmission refers to the transfer of knowledge, practices, values and norms through processes of socialization, enculturation and acculturation which can be intentional or implicit. Intergenerational transmission occurs to a large extent within the family as primary socialization agent. Apart from that, values and norms are learnt in contact with peers and friends, in school or through media. Although the last years have seen an increased research interest in these topics, mechanisms are still unclear and open questions remain with regard to moderators of transmission. The present symposium brings together researchers from three different countries – Germany, Italy and Luxembourg – who will focus on factors that might have an impact on intergenerational value transmission at different points in the family life cycle and outside the family. First, Daniela Barni and colleagues examine the impact of relationship quality toward mothers and fathers on adolescents’ motives for internalization of moral values, thereby taking age of adolescents into account. Christian Hoellger and colleagues then focus on later points in the family life cycle. Taking into account specific life course transitions, they find differences in value transmission, which are however moderated by adult children’s gender. Third, Isabelle Albert and colleagues concentrate on intergenerational transmission of values in the context of acculturation, taking into account parental motivation to transmit values in a sample of Portuguese immigrant compared to non-immigrant families with adult children. Finally, Elke Murdock and Maria Stogianni analyze the roles of friendship patterns for the development of ethnic identity of adolescents who live in a culturally highly diverse setting, underlining the importance of experiences in individuals’ biographies in specific contexts that shape their further development. The discussion will focus on the importance of motives to transmit or take over values, context variables and transitions for intergenerational transmission of values within and outside the family. [less ▲]

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See detailElder Care in the Context of Migration
Albert, Isabelle UL; Kretschmer, Mirjam; Malerba, Angela et al

Scientific Conference (2019, July 03)

Background: Demographic changes related to ageing and migration are key societal issues of our days. Cultural diversity in elder care will increase considerably in the next years especially in Northern ... [more ▼]

Background: Demographic changes related to ageing and migration are key societal issues of our days. Cultural diversity in elder care will increase considerably in the next years especially in Northern and Western European countries due to a large share of first generation immigrants from the 1950s to 1970s. Culture-specific needs, expectations and behavioral tendencies become particularly salient in times of frailty. Cultures differ in how they arrange old age care and intergenerational co-residence patterns. When families migrate from a more collectivist, family-oriented to a more individualist cultural context, the question arises in how far traditional care patterns from the country of origin are retained or adapted to the host cultural context. Ageing migrants have been found to be more reluctant regarding formal care due to cultural, religious or language issues which might put specific pressure on their close family members who are often responsible for care arrangements, even if not providing hands-on care. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to examine how established formal assistance should be modified in order to fit the special needs of both informal caregivers and care receivers with migration background. For this purpose, we will draw on two sub-studies: a) a qualitative study with n = 3 in-depth expert-interviews in the field of elder care and migration, and b) a survey in a daycare center with a large population of elder care receivers with migrant background. Results/Discussion: Preliminary results show different starting points for a culture-sensitive adaptation of the services. First, as the existence of help services is often unknown to migrants, it is important to provide low-threshold information, involving multipliers. Second, an important aspect is the culture-sensitive training of staff, increasing their awareness of cultural aspects in care and introducing an individualized as well as relationship-oriented approach. Finally, the exchange of caregivers with other concerned turned out to be a helpful resource and therefore it shall be facilitated and supported by formal services. A structural integration of cultural sensitive care services in the existing elder care system is highly suggested in order to meet the future challenges. [less ▲]

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See detailStatement of the Board on Cultural and Ethnic Diversity towards intercultural and individual Diversity
De Ponte, Ulrike; Albert, Isabelle UL; Žegura, Iva

Scientific Conference (2019, July 03)

Cultural and individual diversity is getting more and more part of the daily work of each psychologist nowadays, but still this issue is less or insufficiently addressed in the study programmes all over ... [more ▼]

Cultural and individual diversity is getting more and more part of the daily work of each psychologist nowadays, but still this issue is less or insufficiently addressed in the study programmes all over Europe. Therefore, psychologists work repeating in situations of the quality of a cultural overlap being not or insufficient prepared for this yet. The psychologists’ core work of understanding and supporting people from a psychological point of view lacks knowledge as well as the performance of taking in account multiple and differentiated perspectives. The conclusion is: The subject Intercultural psychology needs to be mandatorily included into the curricula of study programmes of Psychology and this already on Bachelor levels. This joint-symposium is supposed to aim in working groups after the input-presentations in order to collect all kind of psychologists’ views on the needs that are seen out of the view of the divers working fields of psychologists. [less ▲]

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See detail“I’m much better off…” - Comparative Processes and Future Intentions of Elder Portuguese Immigrants in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2019, June 28)

Ageing and migration have become key issues in many European countries as a large number of first generation immigrants are approaching retirement age in the next years. Focusing on elder Portuguese ... [more ▼]

Ageing and migration have become key issues in many European countries as a large number of first generation immigrants are approaching retirement age in the next years. Focusing on elder Portuguese immigrants in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, the present study had the aim to explore the roles of social and temporal comparisons for future intentions to stay in the receiving country, return to the country of origin or commute between both. Whereas earlier studies have examined the roles of social or cultural links, economic or health aspects, we focused here on the participants’ personal evaluation of their migratory project by asking them to evaluate their current situation compared with the past and with peers. A sample of N = 109 Portuguese first generation immigrants (49.5% female; average age: M = 55.35, SD = 7.42) who had been living in Luxembourg for about M = 30.69 (SD = 8.55) years were interviewed by use of a standardized questionnaire. Analyses showed that about half of participants preferred to stay in Luxembourg, whereas the remainder planned to return to Portugal or to commute. The appraisal of the current (vs. past) situation was significantly more positive for those who planned to stay or commute compared to those who wanted to return after retirement. Interestingly, both those who planned to return and those who wanted to stay engaged more frequently in social or temporal comparisons than those who preferred to commute. Results will be discussed taking into consideration regulatory processes of subjective well-being and different migration experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailCross-Cultural Psychogerontology
Albert, Isabelle UL; Tesch-Römer, Clemens

in Gu, Danan; Dupre, Matthew E. (Eds.) Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging (2019)

Population aging is a phenomenon that affects most parts of the world. According to recent data from the World Population Prospects (United Nations 2017), the number of older persons – those aged 60+ – ... [more ▼]

Population aging is a phenomenon that affects most parts of the world. According to recent data from the World Population Prospects (United Nations 2017), the number of older persons – those aged 60+ – has reached 962 million worldwide and is expected to climb to 2.1 billion in 2050. In spite of these general world trends, life expectancies differ still largely, and aging remains a highly diverse experience across the world. While universal developmental tasks are markers for older age in all societies (e.g., becoming a grandparent), expectations with regard to typical life trajectories and the timing of transitions vary. This “social clock” (Neugarten et al. 1965) or “cultural chrononormativity of aging” (Brinkmann and Musaeus 2018) is also expressed in legal regulations and policies (e.g., availability and timing of retirement schemes). Normative and nonnormative life events and their interpretation as on time or off-time might thus be defined very differently depending on the cultural (and historical) context (see also Baltes et al. 1980; Wrosch and Heckhausen 2005). This leads to one of the central questions of cross-cultural aging research: Are aging processes universals across cultures and societies in the Western, Eastern, Northern, and Southern parts of the world – or do aging processes differ between cultures and societies? [less ▲]

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See detailOlder adult’s mental health networks: first results of the ARPA ageing project regarding expectations and needs of health professionals
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Hanon, Cécile; Vasseur-Bacle, Simon et al

Poster (2019, May 25)

The European project “ARPA ageing” (co-funded by the Erasmus+ strategic partnerships programme) aims to improve the efficiency of mental health networks for older people. In order to have a better ... [more ▼]

The European project “ARPA ageing” (co-funded by the Erasmus+ strategic partnerships programme) aims to improve the efficiency of mental health networks for older people. In order to have a better knowledge of the perceived strengths and weakness of these networks, we investigated by a survey the needs and expectations of health professionals such as geriatrists, nurses or nursing assistants. A questionnaire of 24 items with an estimated duration of 20 minutes was published online from the 1 March 2018 to the 1 April 2018 in Belgium, France, and Luxembourg. Preliminary data concern 90 health professionals (main categories: 15.6% of nurses, 10% of psychologists, 7.8% of geriatricians and 7.8% of nursing assistants) in the domain of mental health and/or elder care. Notably due to the fact that not all participants already worked with health networks, levels of “no answer” varied between 24.4% to 33.3 according the questions. First results on the total sample reveal that health professionals globally perceived health networks as beneficial to a holistic care approach and care continuity (both 51.1%), and to care access (48.9%). These networks were estimated as beneficial to the increase of professional knowledge regarding older adults (38.9%) and mental health (34.4%), and to the improvement of professional skills (38.9%). Main reported difficulties working with these networks were the lack of information about these networks (56.7%) and the related health professions (50.1%), the lack of time and financial compensation (both 36.7%), and of coordinating tools (36.7%). This study is being extended to more participants and countries (i.e., Greece and Romania) in order to have a larger and more representative understanding of the European situation and cultural differences regarding mental health networks. This information will guide the next steps of the ARPA ageing project: the development of a European Internet platform and the production of guidelines to facilitate the implementation and monitoring of efficient mental health networks in Europe. [less ▲]

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