References of "Albert, Isabelle 50000108"
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See detailThe sense of belonging in the context of migration – Meanings and developmental trajectories
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

in Wagoner, Brady; Christiansen, Bo; Demuth, Carolin (Eds.) Culture as a Process (in press)

The need to belong is fundamental to human beings and constitutes a basis for subjective well-being. It is closely linked to further concepts, such as identification, connectedness, attachment, fitting in ... [more ▼]

The need to belong is fundamental to human beings and constitutes a basis for subjective well-being. It is closely linked to further concepts, such as identification, connectedness, attachment, fitting in and feeling “at home”. The present contribution will focus on the sense of belonging in the context of migration in its different facets - cultural, social and spatial - and in relation to different points of reference - national, ethnic and transnational belonging. Applying the lens of cultural psychology of semiotic mediation, the development of a sense of belonging will be discussed with regard to first generation migrants and their second-generation offspring in a life span perspective, drawing on concepts such as proculturation as well as the Trajectory Equifinality Approach. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: Immigrants‘ Acculturation across the Lifespan
Schwarz, Beate; Maehler, Debora; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July 28)

Immigrants’ acculturation is a bi-linear process that refer to the orientation towards the host and the ethnic culture. Additionally, acculturation is a multidimensional construct that comprises changes ... [more ▼]

Immigrants’ acculturation is a bi-linear process that refer to the orientation towards the host and the ethnic culture. Additionally, acculturation is a multidimensional construct that comprises changes with respect to practices and behaviors, values and norms, and identity and identification (Schwartz, Unger, Zamboanga, & Szapocznik, 2010). From a developmental perspective, acculturation of first and second-generation immigrants differ remarkably because usually second generation immigrants have more opportunities to interact with representatives of the host culture in a phase of life with high plasticity (Sam & Oppedal, 2003). The symposium wants to gain insight into the complex acculturation processes with four studies that referred to different dimensions of acculturation and including age groups from adolescence to old age. The studies used quantitative and qualitative analyses and variable- as well as person-centered approaches. Starting with adolescence, Maehler provides a meta-analysis on factors that are related to identification with the ethnic and mainstream culture. Murdock and Gales also refer to the identity dimension of acculturation, here among young adults in Germany. With a qualitative approach they identified the role of the parents and the intergenerational relationships for the way how these young adults integrate both identities. In the third study with middle-aged second- generation immigrants in Switzerland, again intergenerational relationships are in the focus. Schwarz and Pfammatter analyzed the association of intergenerational relationships with orientations toward ethnic and mainstream culture. In the last study, Albert and colleagues used a person-centered approach. They investigated the patterns of sense of belonging on a local and national level of older immigrants in Luxembourg and the associations with expectations to stay and well-being. All four studies provide specific insight into the acculturation mechanism that are relevant in different periods of the lifespan. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: Crossing borders – feeling connected? An exploration of drivers influencing the development of a sense of belonging in the receiving society
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Decieux, Jean Philippe Pierre UL et al

Scientific Conference (2021, July 08)

Migrants face the complex task of establishing bonds with the receiving society. The development of a sense of belonging is linked to subjective wellbeing. The present panel investigates factors ... [more ▼]

Migrants face the complex task of establishing bonds with the receiving society. The development of a sense of belonging is linked to subjective wellbeing. The present panel investigates factors influencing the development of a sense of belonging. It brings together researchers from four different countries, applying different methodological approaches examining the development of belonging among different migrant groups. Jean Décieux explores the role of cultural distance in the host country adjustment process. Suggesting a multidimensional conceptualization of cultural distance, he presents findings based on recently migrated German nationals (N = 2856) drawn from the German Emigration and Remigration Panel Study (GERPS). The role of cultural distance in negotiating belonging among young migrant women growing up in Germany is the subject of Elke Murdock’s qualitative study. Results point to the important role of parents in the process. How parents’ commitment or lack of commitment affects their children’s construction of their sense of belonging is the focus of Anna Gruszczynska’s qualitative study among immigrant youth in the UK. She shows the fluctuating nature of the pursuit of belonging in time and space. Gry Paulgaard focuses on immigrants arriving in the rural space of Northern Norway. The project explores everyday life practices of refugees taking the materiality of a place as a starting point, acknowledging the interdependency between the social and material contexts for practice. Finally, Isabelle Albert investigates practices by older migrants living in multicultural Luxembourg, their engagement or otherwise in social practices and how this impacts on their sense of belonging. [less ▲]

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See detailVulnerability in the context of migration: a critical assessment of its conceptualizations and uses
Gilodi, Amalia UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Nienaber, Birte UL

Scientific Conference (2021, July 07)

The notions of ‘vulnerability’ and ‘vulnerable group’ have increasingly gained prominence in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its ... [more ▼]

The notions of ‘vulnerability’ and ‘vulnerable group’ have increasingly gained prominence in academic literature, policymaking, humanitarian debates and everyday discourses on migration and asylum. Its popularity, not limited to this field, has often led academics and practitioners to use ‘vulnerability’ as a self-explanatory condition or phenomenon. However, vulnerability is neither conceptually straight-forward nor politically and morally neutral. Multiple definitions and operationalizations of vulnerability exist across and within different fields of research and practice, without a common and systematic understanding of the concept. The notion of vulnerability can also be instrumentilised as a tool for discrimination, stigmatization, control, exclusion or even reduction of humanitarian assistance, when access to protection is restricted to ‘the most vulnerable’. In the context of the H2020 project MIMY (n°870700), this paper examines the multiplicities and hidden pitfalls behind different conceptualizations and uses of vulnerability and critically reflects on their implication for the study and governance of migration. By unpacking this concept, we hope to highlight both limitations and opportunities enclosed in the notion of vulnerability and encourage migration scholars to understand, address and take a stand before its complexities. Based on these considerations, a multilevel conceptual model of vulnerability in the specific context of migration is proposed. The model aims to capture several types and understandings of vulnerability and how these are (re)produced at different levels and by different actors, including migrants themselves. Particular attention is paid to migrants’ biographical and psychological experiences of vulnerability and how policy and political frameworks may affect them. [less ▲]

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See detailSymposium: Looking back or forward? The cultural identity construction of immigrant youth.
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Maehler, Debora et al

Scientific Conference (2021, June 03)

This symposium pursues cultural identity formation (in terms of identifications with country of origin and country of residence) of immigrant youth using different methods. We will start with a literature ... [more ▼]

This symposium pursues cultural identity formation (in terms of identifications with country of origin and country of residence) of immigrant youth using different methods. We will start with a literature review on previous findings on cultural identification of first-generation immigrant youth worldwide, zoom in closer by looking on identity transmission processes between generations and finishing off with individual-level findings on identity construction by second-generation immigrants. First, results from a meta-analysis will be presented which investigated core factors affecting identity development among first-generation youth. The meta-analysis summarized which individual and context related factors predict cultural identity formation. The second study, employing a quantitative design, focuses on the cultural identity processes and dynamics of change between first-generation immigrant parents and their children (second generation) in a heterogeneous European country context - Luxemburg. The third study employs a qualitative design focusing on identity negotiation processes of young second generation immigrants growing up in Germany. Young Tamils were interviewed, exploring the cultural navigation processes in-depth. Findings across the studies and approaches indicate moderate to strong identifications with both, the country of origin and country of residence. The drivers for each outcome will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailThe sense of belonging in the context of migration
Albert, Isabelle UL

Presentation (2021, April 28)

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See detailCorrelates Of Resilience In The Context Of Social Isolation In Seniors (CRISIS)
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Presentation (2021, April 21)

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See detailPerceived loneliness and the role of cultural and intergenerational belonging: the case of Portuguese first‑generation immigrants in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL

in European Journal of Ageing (2021)

The risk of loneliness for migrants, particularly in older age, has been documented across multiple studies. Migration is a life-changing transition. While often retaining links to their country of origin ... [more ▼]

The risk of loneliness for migrants, particularly in older age, has been documented across multiple studies. Migration is a life-changing transition. While often retaining links to their country of origin, an important developmental task for migrants is the establishment of bonds in the receiving country. Drawing on recent studies, I will explore the role of cultural and intergenerational belonging in order to identify both protective and risk factors regarding loneliness in middle and older age in a sample of first-generation immigrants from Portugal living in Luxembourg. The sample comprises N = 131 participants (51.9% female) between the ages of 41 and 80 (M = 56.08; SD = 7.80) who have on average spent M = 31.71 years (SD = 8.81) in Luxembourg and raised children in Luxembourg. They took part in the IRMA project (‘Intergenerational Relations in the Light of Migration and Ageing’) which was funded by the Fonds National de la Recherche Luxembourg. A standardised questionnaire assessed socio-demographic data, aspects of cultural belonging (i.e. cultural attachment to both countries, bicultural identity orientation, acculturative stress), intergenerational belonging (i.e. family cohesion, family conflict, perceived intergenerational value consensus) and perceived loneliness. Results showed that while cultural and intergenerational belonging were protective factors, the strongest predictors for participants’ perceived loneliness were cultural identity conflict and, even more so, intergenerational conflict. Our findings suggest that establishing roots and bonds in the host country is a protective factor against loneliness, whereas the feeling of not fitting in is a strong risk factor. [less ▲]

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See detailPerceived Ageism During the Covid-19-Crisis is Longitudinally Related to Subjective Perceptions of Aging
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine et al

in Frontiers in Public Health (2021)

Ageism in media and society has increased sharply during the Covid-19-crisis, with expected negative consequences for the health and well-being of older adults. The current study investigates whether ... [more ▼]

Ageism in media and society has increased sharply during the Covid-19-crisis, with expected negative consequences for the health and well-being of older adults. The current study investigates whether perceived ageism during the crisis longitudinally affects how people perceive their own aging. In June 2020, N = 611 older adults from Luxembourg [aged 60 – 98 years, Mage(SD) = 69.92(6.97)] participated in a survey on their perception of the crisis. In October 2020, N = 523 participated in a second measurement occasion. Participants reported on perceived ageism during the crisis in different domains, their self-perceptions of aging and subjective age. In latent longitudinal regression models, we predicted views on aging at T2 with perceived ageism at T1, while controlling for baseline views on aging and covariates. Perceived ageism at T1 increased self-perceptions of aging as social loss and yielded a trend for physical decline, while there were no effects on subjective age and self-perceptions of aging as continued growth. Views on aging are powerful predictors of well-being and health outcomes in later life. Our data suggest that being the target of ageism during the crisis negatively affects older adults’ self-perceptions of aging and this impact may be felt beyond the current crisis. [less ▲]

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See detailFamilies and family values in society and culture
Albert, Isabelle UL; Emirhafizovic, Mirza; Shpigelman, Carmit-Noa et al

Book published by Information Age Publishing (2021)

This book which has been created in the framework of the EU-funded COST Action INTERFASOL brings together researchers from 22 INTERFASOL countries, who frame intergenerational family solidarity in the ... [more ▼]

This book which has been created in the framework of the EU-funded COST Action INTERFASOL brings together researchers from 22 INTERFASOL countries, who frame intergenerational family solidarity in the specific historical, cultural, social and economic context of their own country. Integrating different perspectives from social and political sciences, economics, communication, health and psychology, the book offers country-specific knowledge and new insights into family relations, family values and family policies across Europe. The volume is the product of a unique endeavor of researchers across Europe to provide up-to-date first-hand country-specific knowledge on family and intergenerational relations and will serve as a base for both country-specific as well as cross-cultural studies. [less ▲]

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See detailAgeism and Older People's Health and Well-Being during the Covid-19 Pandemic: The Moderating Role of Subjective Aging
Kornadt, Anna Elena UL; Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine et al

in European Journal of Ageing (2021), 18

Detailed reference viewed: 100 (6 UL)
See detailFamilies Across Europe - Now and Then
Albert, Isabelle UL; Valsiner, Jaan; Komatsu, Koji

in Albert, Isabelle; Emirhafizovic, Mirza; Shpigelman, Carmit-Noa (Eds.) et al Families and Family Values in Society and Culture (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 85 (0 UL)
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See detailFamily in a multicultural context: Country report for Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL; Heinz, Andreas UL

in Albert, Isabelle; Emirhafizovic, Mirza; Shpigelman, Carmit-Noa (Eds.) et al Families and family values in society and culture (2021)

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a small country in the heart of Europe, neighbouring France, Germany and Belgium, counting on 1 January of 2019 613.894 inhabitants on a total area of 2,586 km² ... [more ▼]

The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg is a small country in the heart of Europe, neighbouring France, Germany and Belgium, counting on 1 January of 2019 613.894 inhabitants on a total area of 2,586 km². Immigration and cultural diversity have become one of the key features in the last years as the share of foreigners has constantly increased to now 47% of the population (Statec, 2019). Recent migrants live on the territory along with ageing migrants who are now close to retirement, as well as earlier generations of migrants. Luxembourg can therefore today be characterized as super-diverse (Vertovec, 2007) and is seen as a sample case for European integration, certainly of high interest also regarding intergenerational family solidarity in the light of migration. We will outline the complex demographic picture in the following sections, focusing on socio-economic aspects as well as social policy issues and have then a closer look on intergenerational family solidarity and future areas of research. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational Family Solidarity across Europe
Albert, Isabelle UL; Emirhafizovic, Mirza; Shpigelman, Carmit-Noa et al

in Albert, Isabelle; Emirhafizovic, Mirza; Shpigelman, Carmit-Noa (Eds.) et al Families and family values in society and culture (2021)

The global trend of ageing populations is particularly pronounced in Europe. In the wake of increased life expectancies, intergenerational family relationships have become more and more important over the ... [more ▼]

The global trend of ageing populations is particularly pronounced in Europe. In the wake of increased life expectancies, intergenerational family relationships have become more and more important over the last few decades. The COST Action INTERFASOL started from the claim that in light of these developments societies need to develop mechanisms, programs and policies that will support solidarity between the young, middle and older generations. Although considerable research activities in the field of intergenerational relations have been carried out in the last years, a lack in coordination and integration of different studies from different settings was noted. Bringing together research from different countries to coordinate studies and synthesize results is not an easy endeavor but it has turned out as a fruitful venture: INTERFASOL has been successful in bringing together researchers from 28 different countries meeting regularly, discussing current issues and not least producing a large number of publications and research proposals. One outcome of the COST Action is this volume which has the aim to become a reference for all those who are interested in intergenerational relations in Europe: the chapters will provide the basis and a starting point for further research. [less ▲]

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See detailResilienz im Kontext von Migration und Flucht
Mehl, Sonja; Gilodi, Amalia UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

in Ringeisen, Tobias; Genkova, Petia; Leong, Frederick T. L. (Eds.) Handbuch Stress und Kultur: Interkulturelle und kulturvergleichende Perspektiven (2021)

Im Rahmen von Migration ergibt sich insbesondere für Geflüchtete ein erhöhtes Risiko von ungünstigen Entwicklungen und Adaptationsverläufen, da sie nicht nur mit allgemeinen Herausforderungen der ... [more ▼]

Im Rahmen von Migration ergibt sich insbesondere für Geflüchtete ein erhöhtes Risiko von ungünstigen Entwicklungen und Adaptationsverläufen, da sie nicht nur mit allgemeinen Herausforderungen der Anpassung an einen neuen kulturellen Kontext konfrontiert sind, sondern auch mit spezifischen Erfahrungen im Herkunftsland oder auf der Flucht, die potentiell traumatisch sein können. Dennoch zeigen sich signifikante psychische Beeinträchtigungen in der Folge nur bei einem Teil der Geflüchteten. Das Konzept der Resilienz, das in den letzten Jahren nicht nur in Bereichen der klinischen Psychologie, sondern auch in der entwicklungspsychologischen Forschung und verwandten Disziplinen zunehmend an Bedeutung gewonnen hat, scheint besonders fruchtbar, um solche interindividuellen Unterschiede im Umgang mit Flucht- und Migrationserfahrungen zu erforschen. Nach einer kurzen Einführung in die Arten der Migration und damit zusammenhängende Herausforderungen befasst sich der vorliegende Beitrag mit Resilienz im Kontext von Migration und Flucht, wobei eine kritische Auseinandersetzung mit stark auf individuelle Faktoren fokussierten Konzeptualisierungen angestrebt und eine stärker systemische Sichtweise vorgeschlagen wird, wie sie auch neueren Ansätzen zur psychologischen Resilienz entspricht. [less ▲]

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See detailDigitale Kommunikation im Alter – Erste Ergebnisse der CRISIS-Studie
Albert, Isabelle UL; Hoffmann, Martine; Murdock, Elke UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, November 10)

In Folge der Kontaktbeschränkungen und Maßnahmen der sozialen Distanzierung zur Eindämmung der Corona Pandemie wurde vielfach von einem vermehrten Gebrauch digitaler Medien zur Aufrechterhaltung sozialer ... [more ▼]

In Folge der Kontaktbeschränkungen und Maßnahmen der sozialen Distanzierung zur Eindämmung der Corona Pandemie wurde vielfach von einem vermehrten Gebrauch digitaler Medien zur Aufrechterhaltung sozialer Kontakte berichtet. Die vorliegende Studie liefert erste Hinweise darauf, inwiefern sich das Kommunikationsverhalten älterer Menschen während der COVID-19 Krise verändert hat, wie der Gebrauch verschiedener Kommunikationsmittel mit der Reduktion von Einsamkeit und sozialer Isolation zusammenhängt und ob digitale Medien traditionelle Formen der Kommunikation verdrängen oder ergänzen. Im Juni 2020 wurden im Rahmen des vom FNR Luxemburg geförderten CRISIS-Projekts N = 611 in Privathaushalten lebende Personen im Alter zwischen 60 und 98 Jahren zu ihrem Erleben während der COVID-19 Krise befragt. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass das Telefon insgesamt zwar weiterhin das wichtigste Kommunikationsmittel älterer Menschen bleibt, jedoch nehmen digitale Medien insbesondere in der Gruppe der 60-69-jährigen einen wichtigen Stellenwert ein, um mit anderen in Kontakt zu bleiben. Dabei reduzierte ein gestiegener Gebrauch digitaler Medien (wie auch traditioneller Medien) das Gefühl, nicht genug Gesellschaft zu haben. Außerdem scheinen neue Arten der Kommunikation traditionelle Arten in unserer Zielgruppe nicht zu ersetzen, sondern sie ergänzen sich gegenseitig. Die Ergebnisse werden mit Bezug auf Maßnahmen zur Reduktion sozialer Isolation und Einsamkeit im Alter und im Kontext von COVID-19 diskutiert. [less ▲]

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See detailLe Vieillissement Actif au Luxembourg (VAL): Active Ageing in Luxembourg
Albert, Isabelle UL

Presentation (2020, September 04)

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See detailMixed Methods to Empower Migrant Youth in Vulnerable Conditions: a place-based, migrant-centered international project
Gilodi, Amalia UL; Bissinger, Jutta UL; Albert, Isabelle UL et al

Scientific Conference (2020, July 02)

In this methodological paper, we will present a newly established international and interdisciplinary research project focusing on empowering young migrants in vulnerable conditions and supporting ... [more ▼]

In this methodological paper, we will present a newly established international and interdisciplinary research project focusing on empowering young migrants in vulnerable conditions and supporting integration strategies within the EU in a unique and comprehensive mixed methods research design combining secondary analysis with qualitative empirical data. The triangulation of results from different sources and methods will help to provide a deeper insight into the integration processes from the perspectives of migrants, host nationals and experts. In the framework of MIMY, financed by H2020 and comprising 12 consortium members from 11 disciplines and 9 European countries, we will focus on various challenges of integration strategies of young migrants in vulnerable conditions, considering different sectors from the perspective of different actors, at macro-, meso- and micro-levels. This will help to explain the successes and failures of integration over migrants’ life courses as well as the long-term consequences for migrant communities and the hosting society. The research design of MIMY follows several steps: 1) desk research - literature review, content analysis, mapping exercises, 2) quantitative secondary data analysis, policy and discourse analysis, 3) qualitative empirical studies, and 4) synthesizing and synergizing all findings and drawing policy recommendations. The present paper will outline how this project integrates qualitative and quantitative methods by using an innovative, multi-method approach (e.g. policy analyses, delphi study, focus groups, in-depth qualitative interviews, participatory action research) in order to explore vulnerability and resilience of young migrants in cross-national perspectives combining policy analysis with demographic, sociological, psychological, discursive, and ethnographic analysis. [less ▲]

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See detailIntergenerational relations and the sense of belonging in the context of migration – What do second generation young adults learn from their first generation parents (and vice versa)?
Albert, Isabelle UL; Barros Coimbra, Stephanie UL

Scientific Conference (2020, July 02)

Migration is a life transition that entails changes in social and emotional belonging, and an important developmental task for migrants is the establishment of bonds in the receiving country. While first ... [more ▼]

Migration is a life transition that entails changes in social and emotional belonging, and an important developmental task for migrants is the establishment of bonds in the receiving country. While first generation immigrants have been enculturated in the culture of origin before being confronted with the host culture, their children grow up in two or multiple different value systems and cultures during their formative years. How does this so-called second-generation experience their cultural belonging and how are their identity constructions related to their parents’? This was a main topic of the FNR-funded IRMA project which compared first and second generations from Portuguese migrant families in the Luxembourgish multicultural context with regard to their cultural identity, intergenerational relations and transmission processes. The sample of the present study consists of family dyads resp. Triads comprising n = 70 PT mothers and n = 65 PT fathers over the age of 50 who arrived about 30 years ago to Luxembourg, together with n = 72 PT young adults (mean age M = 28. 2, SD = 7. 9; 61. 1% female) already born or grown up in Luxembourg. By use of a newly developed measure of cultural attachment to Luxembourg and Portugal, we examine the intergenerational continuity in the sense of cultural belonging and identify mediators in the transmission process such as relationship quality and the motivation to transmit or accept parental values. Results will be discussed with reference to an integrative model on intergenerational relations in the light of age and migration experiences. [less ▲]

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See detailCrossing borders – feeling connected? Exploring the sense of belonging
Murdock, Elke UL; Albert, Isabelle UL

Scientific Conference (2020, July 02)

Migrants find themselves living in a society with different practices, norms and values to their culture of origin. Migration is a life transition that entails changes in social and emotional belonging ... [more ▼]

Migrants find themselves living in a society with different practices, norms and values to their culture of origin. Migration is a life transition that entails changes in social and emotional belonging. This panel focuses on the question how migrants establish bonds in their receiving country. How do migrants negotiate their sense of belonging to the host and / or home country? What determines the strength of attachment to either of both? The present panel brings together researchers from three different countries who focus on the sense of belonging of different migrant populations. First, Isabelle Albert presents findings from a research project that examined intergenerational value transmission and cultural attachment to Portugal and Luxembourg among first and second-generation migrants in Luxembourg. Intergenerational relationships and migration are also the focus of Carlos Barros’ presentation. He presents findings from a qualitative study on intergenerational solidarity and maps solidarity patterns for different migrant groups. Jean Décieux presents identity constructions of international mobiles. The German Emigration and Remigration Panel study (GERPS) covers the migration trajectories of about 11,000 individuals. Patterns of belonging will be highlighted and discussed. Débora Maehler presents insights from a meta-analysis on the sense of belonging of young immigrants in Germany. Factors determining the strength of belonging to either their country of origin or Germany will be explored. The panel closes with a contribution by Elke Murdock on the host country perspective. She presents results from a quantitative study on criteria and predictors for the acceptance of new citizens as belonging by natives. [less ▲]

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