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See detailPsychological responses to body shape exposure in patients with bulimia nervosa.
Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vögele, Claus UL; Bracht, Susanne et al

in Behaviour research and therapy (2003), 41

One of the unresolved issues regarding research on bulimia nervosa concerns the question as to how patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa respond to body image exposure. In addition, it remains unclear ... [more ▼]

One of the unresolved issues regarding research on bulimia nervosa concerns the question as to how patients diagnosed with bulimia nervosa respond to body image exposure. In addition, it remains unclear whether there are differential responses associated with different exposure techniques (e.g. in vivo exposure vs. exposure by visualization). The aim of the present study was to investigate psychological responses to body image exposure. Twenty participants diagnosed with bulimia nervosa (DSM IV) and twenty non-eating disordered individuals were exposed to their body image using a video recording (video confrontation). In addition, they were asked to imagine and describe the appearance of their body (imagery task). Results indicate that self-reported negative emotions increased in response to both, video confrontation and imagery task, in the clinical as well as in the control group. Furthermore, video confrontation led to more pronounced group differences than exposure by visualization (imagery task). Participants diagnosed with bulimia nervosa took less time to describe their waist, hips and bottom compared to non-eating disturbed controls. This last result could be interpreted in terms of avoidance behavior and other mechanisms during body image exposure. [less ▲]

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See detailPsychophysiologic effects of applied tension on the emotional fainting response to blood and injury.
Vögele, Claus UL; Coles, Justine; Wardle, Jane et al

in Behaviour research and therapy (2003), 41

OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to investigate the psychophysiologic effects of "Applied Tension" (AT) on the emotional fainting response to blood and injury in a controlled experiment. METHOD ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The present study was designed to investigate the psychophysiologic effects of "Applied Tension" (AT) on the emotional fainting response to blood and injury in a controlled experiment. METHOD: Twenty-two persons reporting to generally feel faint or to have fainted at the sight of blood or injury and 22 participants classified as Non-Fainters were randomly allocated to a treatment or control condition. Psychophysiologic responses were continuously monitored while individuals watched a video depicting open-heart surgery and a control film. Prior to the surgery film, participants in the treatment condition were instructed in the use of AT. RESULTS: All participants classified as Fainters showed a diphasic response pattern while watching the surgery film. This response, however, was significantly attenuated in Fainters in the treatment condition. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that AT provides an effective treatment strategy for the prevention of fainting responses in persons with a fear of blood and injury. [less ▲]

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See detailSport und Bewegung als Behandlungsansatz
Vögele, Claus UL

in Petermann, F.; Pudel, V. (Eds.) Adipositas (2003)

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See detailKörperliche Aktivität in der Adipositastherapie
Vögele, Claus UL

in Schusdziarra, V. (Ed.) Adipositas - Konzepte für ein Langzeitproblem (2003)

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See detailEffects of prolonged and repeated body image exposure in binge eating disorder
Hilbert, Anja; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vögele, Claus UL

in Journal of Psychosomatic Research (2002), 52

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to investigate psychological mechanisms associated with prolonged and repeated body image exposure. METHOD: In an experimental design, 30 female volunteers ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to investigate psychological mechanisms associated with prolonged and repeated body image exposure. METHOD: In an experimental design, 30 female volunteers diagnosed with binge-eating disorder (BED) (DSM-IV) and 30 non-eating-disordered controls (NC) were exposed to their physical appearance in a mirror. The confrontation procedure was guided by a standardized interview manual and took place on two separate days. Self-reported mood, appearance self-esteem, and frequency of negative cognitions were assessed repeatedly throughout the experiment. RESULTS: During body image exposure sessions, binge-eating-disordered individuals showed significantly lower mood than controls while appearance self-esteem was diminished in both groups. During the second body image exposure session, higher levels of mood and appearance self-esteem were observed in both groups, and negative cognitions occurred less frequently. CONCLUSION: Results are discussed with regard to the therapeutic use of body image exposure. [less ▲]

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See detailHIV und AIDS bei Kindern
Vögele, Claus UL

in Schwarzer, R.; Jerusalem, M.; Weber, H. (Eds.) Gesundheitspsychologie von A bis Z (2002)

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See detailPsychosomatic pathways to essential hypertension: the combined effect of anger and family history of cardiovascular disorders on cardiovascular reactivity
Vögele, Claus UL

in Excerpta Medica International Congress Series1241 (2002)

Previous results from our laboratory suggest a combined effect of anger-suppression and family history of cardiovascular disorders in determining cardiovascular responses to mental stress. The present ... [more ▼]

Previous results from our laboratory suggest a combined effect of anger-suppression and family history of cardiovascular disorders in determining cardiovascular responses to mental stress. The present study was designed to determine the effect sizes in cardiovascular reactivity associated with biological risk, psychological risk and the combination of these risk factors using meta-analytical techniques. Results from three independent studies with almost identical experimental procedures provided the basis for the calculation of d, the difference between the means of two groups, divided by the pooled within-group standard deviation. Effect sizes were calculated for the comparison of high versus low biological hypertension risk, high versus low anger suppression, and high versus low combined risk. The results show the largest effect sizes for the comparison of high versus low combined risk. The effect sizes associated with the combination of risk factors were larger than the sum of the effect sizes associated with either factor alone. We conclude that the combination of biological and psychological risk factors in determining cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress is more than the sum of its parts. These findings are discussed in terms of a better understanding of the over-additive effects of multiple cardiovascular risk factors on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. [less ▲]

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See detailKörpergewicht und Gewichtsregulation
Vögele, Claus UL

in Schwarzer, R.; Jerusalem, M.; Weber, H. (Eds.) Gesundheitspsychologie von A bis Z (2002)

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See detailStress und kardiovaskuläre Reaktion
Vögele, Claus UL

in Schwarzer, R.; Jerusalem, M.; Weber, H. (Eds.) Gesundheitspsychologie von A bis Z (2002)

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See detailPsychophysiological effects of relaxation training in children
Lohaus, Arnold; Klein-Hessling, Johannes; Vögele, Claus UL et al

in British Journal of Health Psychology (2001), 6

OBJECTIVES: This study compares the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and an imagery-based relaxation training on childrens' physiological and subjective responses in a randomized controlled trial ... [more ▼]

OBJECTIVES: This study compares the effects of progressive muscle relaxation and an imagery-based relaxation training on childrens' physiological and subjective responses in a randomized controlled trial. DESIGN: Sixty-four children aged 9 to 13 years were randomly allocated to either one of three experimental conditions: progressive muscle relaxation, imagery-based relaxation or a control condition (neutral story). There were five training sessions in each condition. METHOD: Heart rate (HR), skin conductance level (SCL), and skin temperature (ST) were measured continuously during a 5-minute baseline period, an 8-minute relaxation training period, and a 5-minute follow-up in each session. In addition, subjective ratings of mood and physical well-being were collected intermittently. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: A physiological pattern indicating relaxation was most clearly associated with the imagery-based relaxation approach (decreases in HR and SCL), although ST remained unchanged. In contrast, progressive muscle relaxation led to an increase in HR during the training. The neutral story condition showed a similar trend as the imagery-based relaxation approach (although not reaching statistical significance). Furthermore, children's ratings of positive mood and physical wellbeing increased during baseline and training periods, but there were no differences between training conditions. The results indicate psychophysiological effects of relaxation instructions which, however, are not specific for systematic relaxation training. [less ▲]

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See detailPower Kids. Ein ambulantes Trainingsprogramm für übergewichtige Kinder
Pudel, Volker; Ellrott, Thomas; Lichtenstein, Silke et al

Book published by AOK-Verlag (2001)

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See detailSurgery and stress
Vögele, Claus UL

in Fink, G. (Ed.) Encyclopedia of stress (2000)

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See detailPsychologische Operationsvorbereitung Erwachsener
Vögele, Claus UL

in Hygiene und Medizin (1999), (24), 184-188

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See detailKardiovaskuläre Reaktivität und die Entwicklung der essentiellen Hypertonie
Vögele, Claus UL

in Verhaltensmodifikation und Verhaltensmedizin (1999), (20), 321-342

Psychophysiological experiments show large individual differences in physiological reactivity to mental stress. Hyperreactivity refers to the propensity for an individual to exhibit increased ... [more ▼]

Psychophysiological experiments show large individual differences in physiological reactivity to mental stress. Hyperreactivity refers to the propensity for an individual to exhibit increased cardiovascular activity during exposure to external stimuli when compared to controls. Essential hypertensives show cardiovascular hyperreactivity that is not reflected in electrodermal or respiratory activity. This result indicates that cardiovascular reactivity could be an important component in the development of essential hypertension. This article provides an overview of conceptual issues and empirical findings concerning the role of cardiovascular reactivity and the development of essential hypertension. [less ▲]

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See detailVerhaltensmedizin. Eine Einführung
Florin, Irmela; Vögele, Claus UL; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

in Flor, H.; Birbaumer, N.; Hahlweg, K. (Eds.) Enzyklopädie der Psychologie, 3 (1999)

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See detailKörperliche Aktivität bei Adipositas
Vögele, Claus UL

in Schusdziarra, V. (Ed.) Adipositas (1999)

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See detailBewegung
Vögele, Claus UL

in Das OPTIFAST TM 52-Programm. Allgemeines Handbuch (1999)

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See detailPsychological and physiological reactivity to stress: an experimental study on bulimic patients, restrained eaters and controls
Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna; Vögele, Claus UL

in Psychotherapy & Psychosomatics (1999), 68

BACKGROUND: Binge eating behavior in bulimic patients is thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of psychophysiological arousal in stressful situations. Previous results suggest that ... [more ▼]

BACKGROUND: Binge eating behavior in bulimic patients is thought to play a crucial role in the regulation of psychophysiological arousal in stressful situations. Previous results suggest that interpersonal stress and achievement challenge are perceived as particularly stressful by bulimic individuals. It is not clear, however, whether bulimic individuals respond to stress with an increased desire to binge, and whether this increase is accompanied by higher psychophysiological reactivity compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients with bulimia nervosa (DSM-IV), 27 restrained eaters, and 27 controls participated in two experimental sessions in which continuous measures of heart rate, blood pressure, respiration rat e, and ecectrodermal activity were monitored under conditions of achievement challenge (mental arithmetic, Stroop test) and interpersonal stress provoking feelings of loneliness and social rejection (film, imagery task). Ratings of desire to binge, negative mood, and hunger were obtained between experimental trials. Groups were matched for age and body mass index. RESULTS: There was a marked difference in subjective ratings during interpersonal stress. Bulimic patients responded to the imagery task with increases in both desire to binge and hunger, whereas restrained eaters and controls showed no change. There were no substantial group differences in psychophysiological reactivity. CONCLUSIONS: The dissociation between emotional responses and physiological activation may have important therapeutic implications. [less ▲]

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See detailStreß und Streßbewältigung
Kaluza, Gert; Vögele, Claus UL

in Flor, H.; Birbaumer, N.; Hahlweg, K. (Eds.) Enzyklopädie der Psychologie, 3 (1999)

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