References of "Tournier, Isabelle 50003214"
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See detailAnimal-Assisted Intervention for Demented Older Adults Suffering from Severe Neuropsychiatric Symptoms – a Pilot Study
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Vives, Marie-Frédérique; Postal, Virginie

Scientific Conference (2015)

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See detailProposition d’un modèle intégratif concernant les bénéfices psychologiques du jardinage chez les personnes âgées
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Postal, Virginie

in Gériatrie et Psychologie Neuropsychiatrie du Vieillissement (2014), 12(4), 424-431

This review of the literature tackles the question of the psychological benefits linked to gardening in older adults. First, the current data on these benefits are reviewed, and the findings reveal that ... [more ▼]

This review of the literature tackles the question of the psychological benefits linked to gardening in older adults. First, the current data on these benefits are reviewed, and the findings reveal that gardening is linked to feelings of accomplishment, well-being and peace, a decrease of depressive symptoms, a protective effect on cognitive functions as well as the development of social links for community living older adults. In institutionalized older adults, gardening promotes internal locus of control and well-being, and is related to a decrease of sadness and anxiety. Second, several explanatory theories are discussed. All of them postulate an action on the cognitive and/or emotional spheres, which were included into a integrated model that must be tested in future research. In conclusion, gardening appears to be a beneficial activity for promoting older adults’ functioning but the current knowledge still has to be extended to understand the specific mechanisms of action. This deeper understanding is necessary in order to improve the future actions depending on this activity. [less ▲]

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See detailSuccessful Ageing and Poverty: The case of Peru
Olivera Angulo, Javier UL; Tournier, Isabelle UL

E-print/Working paper (2014)

This study investigated the determinants of Successful Ageing (SA) in a sample of 4,151 Peruvians aged between 65 and 80 and living in poverty. The data correspond to the ESBAM survey, which is the ... [more ▼]

This study investigated the determinants of Successful Ageing (SA) in a sample of 4,151 Peruvians aged between 65 and 80 and living in poverty. The data correspond to the ESBAM survey, which is the baseline to evaluate the non-contributory public pension program Pension 65. A key contribution of this study is to combine the conceptual appealing of Successful Ageing to measure well-being in old-age with the multidimensional poverty counting approach developed in the economic literature. This setting allows for moving beyond the dichotomy of the SA literature (success or usual ageing) and take advantage of the full distribution of success along the set of dimensions of well-being. Nine indicators of SA have been used to assess the dimensions of physical health, functioning, cognition, emotional health, and life satisfaction. The variables associated with a higher number of satisfied indicators were being a male, younger, literate, working, low food insecurity, good nutritional status, normal blood pressure, absence of disabilities, not smoking, empowerment, good self-esteem, absence of mental disability, and less frequent contact with a social network. From a policy perspective, the results of this study report a remarkably stable effect of three variables affecting SA that can be relatively easy to measure, monitor and affect by public intervention. These variables are food security, nutrition quality, and self-esteem. [less ▲]

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See detailCrossing a two-way street: comparison of young and old pedestrians
Dommes, Aurélie; Cavallo, Viola; Dubuisson, Jean-Baptiste et al

in Journal of Safety Research (2014), 50

Introduction Choosing a safe gap in which to cross a two-way street is a complex task and only few experiments have investigated age-specific difficulties. Method A total of 18 young (age 19–35), 28 ... [more ▼]

Introduction Choosing a safe gap in which to cross a two-way street is a complex task and only few experiments have investigated age-specific difficulties. Method A total of 18 young (age 19–35), 28 younger-old (age 62–71) and 38 older-old (age 72–85 years) adults participated in a simulated street-crossing experiment in which vehicle approach speed and available time gaps were varied. The safe and controlled simulated environment allowed participants to perform a real walk across an experimental two-way street. The differences between the results for the two lanes are of particular interest to the study of visual exploration and crossing behaviors. Results The results showed that old participants crossed more slowly, adopted smaller safety margins, and made more decisions that led to collisions than did young participants. These difficulties were found particularly when vehicles approached in the far lane, or rapidly. Whereas young participants considered the time gaps available in both lanes to decide whether to cross the street, old participants made their decisions mainly on the basis of the gap available in the near lane while neglecting the far lane. Conclusions The present results point to attentional deficits as well as physical limitations in older pedestrians and have implications in terms of road design and pedestrian training. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of age-related differences in an adapted Hayling task
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Postal, Virginie; Mathey, Stéphanie

in Archives of Gerontology & Geriatrics (2014), 59

The Hayling task is traditionally used to assess activation and inhibitory processes efficiency among various populations, such as elderly adults. However, the classical design of the task may also ... [more ▼]

The Hayling task is traditionally used to assess activation and inhibitory processes efficiency among various populations, such as elderly adults. However, the classical design of the task may also involve the influence of strategy use and efficiency of sentence processing in the possible differences between individuals. Therefore, the present study investigated activation and inhibitory processes in aging with two formats of an adapted Hayling task designed to reduce the involvement of these alternative factors. Thirty young adults (M = 20.7 years) and 31 older adults (M = 69.6 years) performed an adapted Hayling task including a switching block (i.e., unblocked design) in addition to the classical task (i.e., blocked design), and the selection of the response between two propositions. The results obtained with the classical blocked design showed age-related deficits in the suppression sections of the task but also in the initiation ones. These findings can be explained by a co-impairment of both inhibition and activation processes in aging. The results of the unblocked Hayling task, in which strategy use would be reduced, confirmed this age-related decline in both activation and inhibition processes. Moreover, significant correlations between the unblocked design and the Trail Making Test revealed that flexibility is equally involved in the completion of both sections of this design. Finally, the use of a forced-response choice offers a format that is easy to administer to people with normal or pathological aging. This seems particularly relevant for these populations in whom the production of an unrelated word often poses problems. [less ▲]

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See detailArrival-time judgments on multi-lane streets: the failure to ignore irrelevant traffic
Baurès, Robin; Oberfeld, Daniel; Tournier, Isabelle UL et al

in Accident Analysis & Prevention (2014), 65

How do road users decide whether or not they have enough time to cross a multiplelane street with multiple approaching vehicles? Temporal judgments have been investigated for single cars approaching an ... [more ▼]

How do road users decide whether or not they have enough time to cross a multiplelane street with multiple approaching vehicles? Temporal judgments have been investigated for single cars approaching an intersection, however, close to nothing is known about how street crossing decisions are being made when several vehicles are simultaneously approaching in two adjacent lanes. This task is relatively common in urban environments. We report two simulator experiments in which drivers had to judge whether it would be safe to initiate street crossing in such cases. Matching traffic gaps (i.e., the temporal separation between two consecutive vehicles) were presented either with cars approaching on a single lane or with cars approaching on two adjacent lanes, either from the same side (Experiment 1) or from the opposite sides (Experiment 2). The stimuli were designed such that only the shortest gap was decision-relevant. The results showed that when the two gaps were in sight simultaneously (Experiment 1), street-crossing decisions were also influenced by the decision-irrelevant longer gap. Observers were more willing to cross the street when they had access to information about the irrelevant gap. However, when the two gaps could not be seen simultaneously but only sequentially (Experiment 2), only the shorter and relevant gap influenced the street-crossing decisions. The results are discussed within the framework of perceptual averaging processes, and practical implications for road safety are presented. [less ▲]

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See detailSafer Mobility for Elderly Road Users
Mathieson, Paul; Dean, Adrian; Goss, Sue et al

Report (2013)

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See detailMobility and safety of elderly drivers and pedestrians: review of interventions and training programmes
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Dommes, Aurélie; Cavallo, Viola

Poster (2012)

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See detailNear-Infrared Imaging of the Effects of Glucose Ingestion and Regulation on Prefrontal Activation during Dual-Task Execution in Healthy Fasting Older Adults
Gagnon, Christine; Desjardins-Crépeau, Laurence; Tournier, Isabelle UL et al

in Behavioural Brain Research (2012), 232(1), 137-147

Rationale Glucose enhancing effects in older adults have mostly been observed for episodic memory, but have recently been found for attentional control performance. Yet, brain activation patterns ... [more ▼]

Rationale Glucose enhancing effects in older adults have mostly been observed for episodic memory, but have recently been found for attentional control performance. Yet, brain activation patterns underlying these effects are still unknown. Objective The present study examined the acute effects of glucose ingestion on prefrontal brain activation during the execution of a divided attention task in fasting non-diabetic older adults. Methods Twenty older adults (60 years and older) took part in the study that included two experimental sessions. After an overnight fast, participants received either a glucose drink (50 g) or a placebo (saccharin) drink, following which they completed a dual-task. During task execution, prefrontal activation was recorded with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). A repeated-measures design was used such that each participant served as his or her own control. The two experimental sessions were counterbalanced among participants and were performed two weeks apart. Results When participants were in the glucose condition, they showed similar dual-task costs for both tasks, whereas in the placebo condition they prioritized one task over the other, with a significantly larger dual-task cost for the non-prioritized task (p < 0.01). Differential brain activation was also observed in right ventral–lateral prefrontal regions for oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin, with more activation apparent in the glucose condition (p < 0.05). Furthermore, behavioral and activation data were influenced by individual differences in glucose regulation. Conclusions Glucose ingestion appears to momentarily enhance fasting seniors’ capacity to coordinate more equally two concurrent tasks and this is reflected in brain activation patterns. [less ▲]

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See detailThe association between routinization and cognitive resources in later life
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Mathey, Stéphanie; Postal, Virginie

in International Journal of Aging & Human Development (2012), 74

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between routinization of daily life activities and cognitive resources during aging. Routinization could increase excessively during aging and ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between routinization of daily life activities and cognitive resources during aging. Routinization could increase excessively during aging and become maladaptative in reducing individual resources. Fifty-two young participants (M = 20.8 years) and 62 older participants (M = 66.9 years) underwent a routinization scale and cognitive tasks of working memory, speed of processing, and attention. Results revealed that older adults presented a decrease on the three cognitive measures but no change on the routinization score. While no association was observed between routinization and cognitive measures for the young adults, a high routinization was associated with lower cognitive flexibility in the older adults. These findings are interpreted in the light of theories about the positive impact of variety in daily life environment on cognitive functions. [less ▲]

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See detailVieillesse et Vieillissement, Vulnérabilité et Ressources : Regards Croisés.
Bouisson, Jean; Brisset, Camille; Tournier, Isabelle UL et al

Book published by Maison des Sciences de l’Homme d’Aquitaine (2011)

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See detailStrategy selection and aging: Impact of task characteristics
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Postal, Virginie

in Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition (2011), 18

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of aging on strategy selection in a paired-associate word task. Twenty-eight younger adults (mean age = 20.68 years) and 28 older adults (mean age = 68.46 ... [more ▼]

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of aging on strategy selection in a paired-associate word task. Twenty-eight younger adults (mean age = 20.68 years) and 28 older adults (mean age = 68.46 years) studied 39 pairs of concrete, middle and abstract words. The concreteness level was manipulated in order to modify the benefit of imagery and sentence strategies in relation to task characteristics. The results showed an age difference in strategy selection in relation to concreteness level. Older adults showed less adaptive strategy selection for the imagery strategy but not for the sentence strategy. Change in strategy selection did not seem to be explained by better efficiency of sentence than imagery, so this study suggests a partial reduction of strategy adaptivity during aging. [less ▲]

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See detailEffects of depressive symptoms and routinization on metamemory during adulthood
Tournier, Isabelle UL; Postal, Virginie

in Archives of Gerontology & Geriatrics (2011), 52

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of aging, depressive symptoms and preference for routine on metamemory. Twenty-eight young adults (of mean age=20.7 years) and 28 older adults (68.5 ... [more ▼]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of aging, depressive symptoms and preference for routine on metamemory. Twenty-eight young adults (of mean age=20.7 years) and 28 older adults (68.5 years) completed the metamemory in adulthood (MIA) scale for assessing various metamemory dimensions. Compared with young adults, older adults used more external strategy. They used more internal strategy but only those with high depressive symptoms or high routinization. Older adults also reported a less efficient memory than young adults, showing less capacity and more change. In addition, depressive symptoms influenced many MIA subscales: participants with high depressive symptoms reported more external strategy use, less capacity, more change and less locus than participants with low depressive symptoms. Finally, highly routinized participants reported more use of external strategy and experienced more anxiety about memory. These results confirm the impact of aging on metamemory and show that an increase in depressive symptoms even without a depressive state and routinization also influences metamemory. This study shows the need to consider variables that modify memory perception during aging. [less ▲]

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See detailAdaptation cognitive et vieillissement : entre automatisme et flexibilité
Tournier, Isabelle UL

Doctoral thesis (2010)

L'objectif général de cette thèse est d'étudier l'évolution au cours du vieillissement des processus automatiques et contrôlés, nécessaires à une bonne adaptation cognitive quotidienne. Nous nous ... [more ▼]

L'objectif général de cette thèse est d'étudier l'évolution au cours du vieillissement des processus automatiques et contrôlés, nécessaires à une bonne adaptation cognitive quotidienne. Nous nous intéressons à l'influence de différentes variables cognitives (mémoire de travail, vitesse de traitement et vocabulaire) ainsi qu'aux préférences de routinisation sur l'expression de ce possible effet de l'âge. Des épreuves de fluidités sémantiques simples (Expérience 1) et alternées (Expériences 2 et 3) et des formats simples (Expériences 5a et 6a) et alternés (Expériences 5b et 6b) de la tâche de Hayling ont été réalisés par des adultes jeunes (18-30 ans), âgés (60-74 ans) et très âgés (75 ans et plus). Ces épreuves nous permettent d'étudier le processus automatique à travers la diffusion de l'activation en mémoire sémantique et les processus contrôlés par le biais de l'inhibition et de la flexibilité. L'activité cérébrale associée à l'exécution de fluidités simples et alternées est étudiée chez des participants âgés à l'aide de l'imagerie optique (Expérience 4). Les résultats obtenus sont en faveur d'une réduction avec l'âge de l'efficience des processus contrôlés alors que celle des processus automatiques semble conservée. Des phénomènes de compensation se mettraient en place au cours du vieillissement, s'appuyant sur les processus automatiques et les connaissances accumulées. [less ▲]

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See detailNear-Infrared imaging of the Effects of Glucose Ingestion on Prefrontal Activation during Dual-Task in Older Adults
Gagnon, Christine; Tournier, Isabelle UL; Desjardins-Crépeau, Laurence et al

Scientific Conference (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 21 (2 UL)