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See detailHeroism in the Harry Potter Series
Steveker, Lena UL; Berndt, Katrin

Book published by Ashgate (2011)

Taking up the various conceptions of heroism that are conjured in the Harry Potter series, this collection examines the ways fictional heroism in the twenty-first century challenges the idealized forms of ... [more ▼]

Taking up the various conceptions of heroism that are conjured in the Harry Potter series, this collection examines the ways fictional heroism in the twenty-first century challenges the idealized forms of a somewhat simplistic masculinity associated with genres like the epic, romance and classic adventure story. The collection's three sections address broad issues related to genre, Harry Potter's development as the central heroic character and the question of who qualifies as a hero in the Harry Potter series. Among the topics are Harry Potter as both epic and postmodern hero, the series as a modern-day example of psychomachia, the series' indebtedness to the Gothic tradition, Harry's development in the first six film adaptations, Harry Potter and the idea of the English gentleman, Hermione Granger's explicitly female version of heroism, adult role models in Harry Potter, and the complex depictions of heroism exhibited by the series' minor characters. Together, the essays suggest that the Harry Potter novels rely on established generic, moral and popular codes to develop new and genuine ways of expressing what a globalized world has applauded as ethically exemplary models of heroism based on responsibility, courage, humility and kindness. [less ▲]

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See detail007 meets Van Helsing: James Bond and Contemporary Gothic Visual Culture
Steveker, Lena UL

in Frenk, Joachim; Krug, Christian (Eds.) The Cultures of James Bond (2011)

The Bond series has not only traditionally made use of the Gothic mode, but it has also influenced the Gothic in its turn. Taking its cue from the Alan Moore’s graphic novel The League of Extraordinary ... [more ▼]

The Bond series has not only traditionally made use of the Gothic mode, but it has also influenced the Gothic in its turn. Taking its cue from the Alan Moore’s graphic novel The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (vol.1, 1999), its filmic adaptation (2003) and the film Van Helsing (2004), this essay discusses the ways in which the character of Bond and the Bond formula have made their entry into contemporary Gothic visual culture. As the many intertextual references to Bond in both versions of The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen make clear, James Bond has become a role model, a figure other popular-cultural texts draw on and fall back to in gestures of either imitation, subversion or parody. Furthermore, the references to Bond serve to link the texts mentioned above, which are all set in the late Victorian Age, to the popular culture of late the 20th and early 21st centuries. Concentrating in more detail on Van Helsing, which establishes an exceptionally prominent Bondian subtext, this essay reads the film as conflating the narrative and ideological scripts of both Bond and Stoker’s Dracula. As argued in this essay, the combined use of Bond and Gothic mode enables the film to criticise the re-introduction of the categories of good and evil as an allegedly stable binary difference into early 21st-century western Realpolitik. [less ▲]

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See detailIntroduction
Steveker, Lena UL; Berndt, Katrin

in Steveker, Lena; Berndt, Katrin (Eds.) Heroism in the Harry Potter Series (2011)

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See detailReading Trauma in Pat Barker's Regeneration Trilogy.
Steveker, Lena UL

in Onega, Susana; Ganteau, Jean-Michel (Eds.) Ethics and Trauma in British Literature Since the 1960s (2011)

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See detailYour soul is whole and completely your own, Harry’: The Heroic Self in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter.
Steveker, Lena UL

in Steveker, Lena; Berndt, Katrin (Eds.) Heroism in the Harry Potter Series (2011)

J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series is deeply indebted to the tradition of Gothic literature. Not only are the novels set in an enchanted castle complete with ghosts and hidden chambers, they also heavily ... [more ▼]

J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series is deeply indebted to the tradition of Gothic literature. Not only are the novels set in an enchanted castle complete with ghosts and hidden chambers, they also heavily depend on two key motifs of the Gothic tradition – the doppelganger and the split character. Voldemort is set up as Harry’s doppelganger; due to the parallel structures used to construct both characters, he functions as Harry’s dark mirror image. In addition, Voldemort is represented as a split character in the very sense of the word since he has split his soul into seven Horcruxes, with which he hopes to defeat mortality. Harry is also sketched as a split character as he loses control over his own consciousness from time to time and enters Voldemort’s mind. In short, Voldemort and Harry can be seen as two rewritings of conventional stereotypes of the Gothic tradition. However, the motif of the split character has an additional function in the Harry Potter series because it can be analysed as negotiating a specific concept of self as well as the relationship between self and ‘other’ which Rowling’s texts outline. As this essay argues, her novels – especially Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (2007) – conceptualise the self as a closed unity. Harry eventually succeeds in establishing his self when he is eventually able to purge himself from the part of Voldemort’s soul lodging inside himself. Since their hero is established as a separate, autonomous self, the novels can be seen to enter the philosophical discourse of ethics that negotiates the relationship between self and other. In contrast to such influential late 20th-century philosophers as Paul Ricoeur and Emmanuel Levinas, Rowling constructs a concept of self that denies any connection between self and ‘other.’ The Harry Potter series rather privileges a humanist notion of self which can only be called nostalgic from the perspective of 21st-century literary and cultural criticism. [less ▲]

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See detailProceedings: Anglistentag 2010 Saarbrücken
Steveker, Lena UL; Frenk, Joachim

Book published by WVT (2011)

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See detailMonströse Medizin – Horror-Doktoren in der englischen Literatur des 19. Jahrhunderts.
Steveker, Lena UL; Frenk, Joachim; Holzer, Christina

Article for general public (2010)

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See detailIdentity and Cultural Memory in the Fiction of A.S. Byatt: Knitting the Net of Culture
Steveker, Lena UL

Book published by Palgrave Macmillan (2009)

This study provides innovative readings of the key texts of A.S. Byatt's oeuvre by analysing the negotiations of individual identity, cultural memory, and literature which inform Byatt's novels. The book ... [more ▼]

This study provides innovative readings of the key texts of A.S. Byatt's oeuvre by analysing the negotiations of individual identity, cultural memory, and literature which inform Byatt's novels. The book explores the concepts of identity constructed in the novels, showing them to be deeply rooted in British literary history and cultural memory. [less ▲]

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See detailImagining the Other – An Ethical Reading of A.S. Byatt's Possession and The Biographer's Tale
Steveker, Lena UL

in Onega, Susana; Ganteau, Jean-Michel (Eds.) The Ethical Component in Experimental British Fiction Since the 1960'S (2007)

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See detailKnow the Past: know thyself' – die Gattung der metafiktionalen Biographie als alternativer Zugang zur Vergangenheit.
Steveker, Lena UL

in Lepper, Marcel; Siegel, Steffen; Wennerscheid, Sophie (Eds.) Jenseits des Poststrukturalismus? Eine Sondierung (2005)

Detailed reference viewed: 8 (0 UL)