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See detailCyberbullying through the new media: Findings from an international network
Smith, Peter K.; Steffgen, Georges UL

Book published by Psychology Press (2013)

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See detailThe nature of cyberbullying, and an international network
Smith, Peter K.; Steffgen, Georges UL; Sittichai, Ruthaychonnee

in Smith, Peter K.; Steffgen, Georges (Eds.) Cyberbullying through the new media: Findings from an international network (2013)

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See detailMeasuring school climate: An Overview of measurement scales
Kohl, Diane UL; Recchia, Sophie; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Educational Research (2013), 55(4), 411-426

Background: School climate is a heterogeneous concept with a multitude of standardised and validated instruments available to measure it.Purpose: This overview of measurement scales aims to provide ... [more ▼]

Background: School climate is a heterogeneous concept with a multitude of standardised and validated instruments available to measure it.Purpose: This overview of measurement scales aims to provide researchers with short summaries of some of the self-report instruments in existence, especially in relation to the link between school climate and aggression, within the context of Bronfenbrenner’s model. A secondary aim of this article is to show how the same instrument can sometimes be adapted to fit different theoretical approaches or to focus on different dimensions of school climate.Design and methods: After database consultation and literature hand searching, the resulting literature was screened for a statistical analysis of school climate and aggression. Those studies that had unclear operationalisations of the main variables or used qualitative methods were excluded. The resulting selection of studies were further scanned for common instruments used to evaluate school climate.Conclusions: This article will show how the California School Climate Survey (CSCS), the Psychological Sense of School Membership Scale (PSSM), the School Climate Survey (SCS) and the Effective School Battery (ESB) as well as different versions of self-created scales on school connectedness, school climate and school culture have been adapted by different researchers in different contexts. Finally, the necessity of adapting a pre-existing instrument or creating a new one will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailDo bystanders differ in coping of cyberbullying
Steffgen, Georges UL; Thill, Corinne

Scientific Conference (2013, November)

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See detailSuperman vs. BAD man? - The effects of empathy and game character in violent video games
Happ, Christian UL; Melzer, André UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking (2013), 16(10), 774-778

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See detailEmotion regulation in Autism Spectrum Disorder: A review
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2013, October)

Introduction: Emotion regulation is an important aspect of children emotional and social development. Especially, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) seem to be at a disadvantage regarding ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Emotion regulation is an important aspect of children emotional and social development. Especially, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) seem to be at a disadvantage regarding emotion regulation due to social interaction difficulties. In the present study we review the research findings on the specific emotion regulation strategies in children with ASD. Participants and Methods: We carried out literature searches using Primo Central ExLibris for all articles published on emotion regulation in children with ASD since 2003. Articles were included if they met the following criteria: a) comprised participants with ASD under the age of 18 years; b) contained empirical research findings on emotion regulation; and c) used a prospective group comparison design. At the end, the review includes 12 independent studies. Results: In general, findings indicate that children with ASD use less emotion regulation strategies than typically developing peers. However, some studies prove less efficient strategies in children with ASD, while others did not find differences. In studies analysing the impact of interventions, children show diminished expression of negativity and more appropriate emotion regulation during post-treatment. Conclusion: Emotion regulation difficulties are a serious concern for children with ASD, yet empirical studies on this topic are still scarce. More studies with larger samples are needed. Especially, other characteristics, such as social interaction and caregiver’s intervention, that might influence emotion regulation have to be further analysed. [less ▲]

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See detailMeasuring bystander bahaviour in bullying and cyberbullying incidents
Steffgen, Georges UL; Happ, Christian UL; Pfetsch, Jan UL

Scientific Conference (2013, September)

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See detailAutistic traits and emotion regulation
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2013, September)

Introduction: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seem to have lower emotion regulation competence than typically developing individuals; they use more frequently suppression than reappraisal ... [more ▼]

Introduction: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seem to have lower emotion regulation competence than typically developing individuals; they use more frequently suppression than reappraisal (Samson, Huber, & Gross, 2012). Additionally, low levels of resting heart rate variability (HRV) have been associated with poor social functioning and emotional rigidity (Butler, Wilhelm, & Gross, 2006), which characterize individuals with ASD. Therefore, it is hypothesized that typically developing individuals with more autistic traits use more frequently suppression instead of reappraisal and have lower resting HRV. Methodology: 66 students (age: M=21.73, SD=2.49) participated in the study. Firstly, participants resting HRV was measured for 5 minutes. Afterwards, participants watched 5 videos of one minute long each (Gross & Levenson, 1995). Two videos were used to elicit disgust and three were neutral. After each video, participants completed a questionnaire about the emotions felt during the video (Ekman, Friesen, & Ancoli, 1980; adapted by Gross & Levenson, 1993). Finally, participants completed the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ; Baron-Cohen et al., 2001), and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ; Gross & John, 2003). Results: Participants who used more frequently suppression had more autistic traits (M=20.13, SD=4.73) than those who used more frequently reappraisal (M=15.06, SD=4.50; t(64)=3.80, p<.001). Furthermore, the more autistic traits participants had, the more they rated their emotions during the disgust-eliciting videos as pleasant (r(57)=.295, p<.05), and the more they reported feeling positive emotions (r(63)=.262, p<.05). However, no correlation was found regarding negative emotions. Concerning resting HRV participants with more autistic traits had higher HRV (r(47)=.29, p<.05). Conclusions: Similarly to individuals with ASD, typically developing individuals with more autistic traits used more frequently suppression, demonstrating less emotion regulation competence. The reported higher rates of pleasantness during the disgust-eliciting videos and the overall experience of more positive emotions can be interpreted as a lack of cognitive empathy (Baron-Cohen & Wheelwright, 2004). The unexpected resting HRV result might be explained by differences in the pattern of physiological responding (Zahn, Rumsey, & Kammen, 1987). [less ▲]

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See detailMeasured and perceived indoor comfort versus energy efficiency and users‟ control in Luxembourg‟s new school buildings
Brensing, Jessica UL; Schweizer-Ries, Petra; Thewes, Andreas UL et al

Scientific Conference (2013, September)

Room climate can be evident for job productivity and individual ́s health. Its realisation is often of high relevance for the building ́s energy consumption e.g. air conditioning vs. natural ventilation ... [more ▼]

Room climate can be evident for job productivity and individual ́s health. Its realisation is often of high relevance for the building ́s energy consumption e.g. air conditioning vs. natural ventilation. New school buildings in Luxembourg differ significantly regarding to energy consumption, heating, air-conditioning technology and technical control as well as interaction means given to the user. Several studies have shown that personal control plays an important role for the satisfaction with the room climate. Central research question was, how the technological control has to be designed that energy is used efficiently and users are still satisfied with the room climate. In this study technical features to control the room climate e.g. features for ventilation, opening windows and heating systems were summarized to an overall control factor to be compared with perceived control by the users. Physical room climate and its users ́ satisfaction level were measuredas well as the buildings ́ individual energy consumption levels were taken into account. 342 Teachers were asked by a standardised questionnaire during winter 2010/2011 in 31 new school buildings in Luxembourg, in 17 schools technical devices for air temperature, quality and humidity were installed. The results show a strong correlation between perceived control and room climate satisfaction as well as a significant correlation between the technical control factor and perceived control. Further results will be examined. [less ▲]

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See detailThe COST-Action on cyber bullying: Developing an International Network
Steffgen, Georges UL; Smith, Peter K.

Scientific Conference (2013, July)

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See detailMobbing und Gewalt auf der Arbeit - Eine Ursache suizidalen Verhaltens
Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2013, February)

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See detailThe Allure of the Forbidden: Breaking Taboos, Frustration, and Attraction to Violent Video Games
Whitaker, Jodi L.; Melzer, André UL; Steffgen, Georges UL et al

in Psychological Science : A Journal of the American Psychological Society (2013), 24(4), 507-513

Although people typically avoid engaging in antisocial or taboo behaviors, such as cheating and stealing, they may succumb in order to maximize their personal benefit. Moreover, they may be frustrated ... [more ▼]

Although people typically avoid engaging in antisocial or taboo behaviors, such as cheating and stealing, they may succumb in order to maximize their personal benefit. Moreover, they may be frustrated when the chance to commit a taboo behavior is withdrawn. The present study tested whether the desire to commit a taboo behavior, and the frustration from being denied such an opportunity, increases attraction to violent video games. Playing violent games allegedly offers an outlet for aggression prompted by frustration. In two experiments, some participants had no chance to commit a taboo behavior (cheating in Experiment 1, stealing in Experiment 2), others had a chance to commit a taboo behavior, and others had a withdrawn chance to commit a taboo behavior. Those in the latter group were most attracted to violent video games. Withdrawing the chance for participants to commit a taboo behavior increased their frustration, which in turn increased their attraction to violent video games. [less ▲]

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See detailThe Link between School Climate and Violence in School: A Meta-Analytic Review
Steffgen, Georges UL; Recchia, Sophie UL; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang

in Aggression and Violent Behavior (2013), 18(2), 300-309

There has been significant interest in whether and how school climate and violent behavior are meaningfully related. The present meta-analysis reviewed studies reporting a relationship between school ... [more ▼]

There has been significant interest in whether and how school climate and violent behavior are meaningfully related. The present meta-analysis reviewed studies reporting a relationship between school climate and school violence in order to summarize the total effect and the direction of these research findings. Database consultation and literature hand searching yielded 145 articles which were reviewed by two experts. Studies were included if they reported a statistical effect size of the relationship between school climate and school violence. Exclusion criteria were unclear operationalization of the principal variables, research findings from multiple publications, studies using multi-level analysis and qualitative studies. The meta-analysis included 36 independent studies (N = 113,778) with correlations ranging from − .02 to − .53. Using a random-effects model a moderate mean effect size of r = − .26, CI [− 30, − 21] was found. Statistical findings indicated significant heterogeneity and a large range of variance between studies. Meta-regressions analyzed different potential moderators as relevant factors of heterogeneity, but none of these factors could be identified as a moderator. Due to the large variance between the studies, it remains difficult to draw final conclusions. Nevertheless, the moderate effect size underlines the role of environmental aspects for school violence intervention. [less ▲]

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See detailCyberbullying: Recent Areas of Research, and the Work of COST IS0801
Smith, Peter K.; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Bulletin of the International Society for Research on Aggression (2013), 35(1), 20-23

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See detailPreface
Smith, Peter; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Smith, Peter; Steffgen, Georges (Eds.) Cyberbullying through the new media - Findings from an international network (2013)

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See detailEmpathic responsiveness of different participant roles in bullying and cyber bullying
Steffgen, Georges UL; Tintorri, L.; Happ, Christian UL et al

Poster (2012, October)

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See detailWas ist Psychotherapie?
Vögele, Claus UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Article for general public (2012)

Detailed reference viewed: 101 (7 UL)
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See detailI love violent media, but it may harm others: Personality factors and attitudes towards violent media
Happ, Christian UL; Melzer, André UL; Dax, Ann-Kathrin et al

Scientific Conference (2012, July)

Detailed reference viewed: 66 (1 UL)