References of "Steffgen, Georges 50003143"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
See detailHow to prevent cyberbullying and cybergrooming
Steffgen, Georges UL

Conference given outside the academic context (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (0 UL)
Full Text
See detailRegards sur l'évaluation du travail de la police
Heinz, Andreas UL; Steffgen, Georges UL; de Puydt, Cécile et al

E-print/Working paper (2014)

86% de la population estiment que la Police Grand-Ducale réalise du « bon », voire du « très bon » travail. L’évaluation du travail de la police est ainsi légèrement meilleure que pour les tribunaux. En ... [more ▼]

86% de la population estiment que la Police Grand-Ducale réalise du « bon », voire du « très bon » travail. L’évaluation du travail de la police est ainsi légèrement meilleure que pour les tribunaux. En effet, concernant les tribunaux, 75% de la population trouvent qu’ils effectuent du « (très) bon » travail. Une différence existe dans l’appréciation du travail de la police chez les personnes victimes et non-victimes. Parmi les personnes qui n’ont été victimes d’aucun des 14 délits pris en compte par l’enquête au cours des 5 dernières années, 91% sont d’avis que la police fait du « (très) bon » travail. Les victimes, elles, sont 82% à partager cet avis. L’évaluation varie selon la nature et le lieu du délit dont les résidents ont été victimes. 88% des victimes d’un délit ayant eu lieu à l’étranger jugent comme « (très) bon » le travail policier. Ce chiffre descend à 79% pour les victimes de délits qui se sont produits sur le territoire national. Concernant la nature du délit, les victimes de délits sans violence ont une meilleure opinion du travail de la police que les victimes de délits avec violence (82% contre 71%). 89% des victimes qui ont rapporté le délit à la police et qui ont été « très satisfaits » par la manière dont leur affaire personnelle a été traitée pensent que le travail de la Police Grand-Ducale est « (très) bon ». Si par contre les victimes étaient « très insatisfaits » par le traitement de leur dossier, ils sont moins enclins (45%) à évaluer comme « (très) bon » le travail de la police. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 82 (8 UL)
See detailAggressivt Verhalen - Méiglechkeeten der Präventioun
Steffgen, Georges UL

Presentation (2014, May 16)

Aggressiounen a Gewalt sinn och ze Lëtzebuerg e Problem. An dësem Virtrag ginn Froen zu de Groen an Ursaachen vun der Aggressioun, souwéi méiglech Formen der Präventioun diskutéiert.

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailDie Psyche, ein wertvollles Gut
Steffgen, Georges UL

Article for general public (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (6 UL)
See detailMoral disengagement as a predictor of violent video game preference
Melzer, André UL; Happ, Christian; Steffgen, Georges UL

Scientific Conference (2014, May)

Detailed reference viewed: 68 (1 UL)
See detailEffects of Autistic Traits on Emotion Regulation in Neurotypical Adults
Pinto Costa, Andreia UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Poster (2014, May)

Background: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seem to have lower emotion regulation competence (Samson, Huber, & Gross, 2012). It has been reported that ASD is a continuum of social ... [more ▼]

Background: Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seem to have lower emotion regulation competence (Samson, Huber, & Gross, 2012). It has been reported that ASD is a continuum of social-communication disability (Baron-Cohen, Wheelwright, Skinner, Martin, & Clubley, 2001) and that neurotypical individuals are also part of that continuum and have autistic traits. Therefore, neurotypical individuals with more autistic traits would be expected to have lower emotion regulation competence than those with less autistic traits. Additionally, low levels of resting heart rate variability (HRV) have been associated with poor social functioning and emotional rigidity (Butler, Wilhelm, & Gross, 2006), which characterize ASD. Consequently, it is hypothesized that neurotypical individuals with more autistic traits should also have lower resting HRV. Objectives: To analyse if neurotypical adults with more autistic traits use less efficient emotion regulation strategies and the relation to cardiac vagal control. Methods: 80 undergraduate students participated in the study. None of the participants had a diagnosis of ASD. Participants were requested to answer four questionnaires: the Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ; Baron-Cohen et al., 2001), which comprises 50 items and assesses 5 autistic traits in the general population; the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS; Gratz & Roemer, 2004), which comprises 36 items and assesses 6 factors of emotional dysregulation; the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ; Gross & John, 2003), which comprises 10 items and assesses 2 emotion regulation strategies, cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression; and finally, the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20; Bagby, Parker, & Taylor, 1994), which comprises 20 items and assesses 3 factors of alexithymia. In the end, participants’ HRV was measured for 5 minutes. Results: Data collection is still being carried out and therefore definite results cannot be drawn. However, preliminary results seem to indicate that participants who have more autistic traits have in general more difficulties regulating their emotions. They use more often suppression than reappraisal as emotion regulation strategy and demonstrate more difficulties in two factors of the DERS (“Lack of emotional awareness” and “Lack of emotional clarity”). Results also seem to indicate that those with more autistic traits have a higher score in alexithymia. Concerning HRV, preliminary results indicate that those with more autistic traits have higher resting HRV. Conclusions: Preliminary results indicate that, neurotypical individuals who have more autistic traits have a less adaptive emotion regulation profile compared to neurotypical individuals with less autistic traits. They use more frequently expressive suppression and less frequently cognitive reappraisal and have more difficulties understanding and being aware of their emotions. This could be explained by the fact that, similarly to individuals with ASD, neurotypical individuals with more autistic traits have more difficulties taking another person mental perspective. This is also supported by findings that those with more autistic traits have a higher score in alexithymia, showing that they have more difficulties identifying and describing emotions. The unexpected HRV result might be explained by differences in the pattern of physiological responding (Zahn, Rumsey, & Kammen, 1987). [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 166 (15 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA towel less: Social norms enhance pro-environmental behavior in hotels
Reese, Gerhard UL; Loew, Kristina; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Journal of Social Psychology (2014), (154), 97-100

Previous research has shown that normative appeals to engage in environmentally friendly behavior were most effective when they were accompanied by a provincial norm (e.g., when norms matched individuals’ ... [more ▼]

Previous research has shown that normative appeals to engage in environmentally friendly behavior were most effective when they were accompanied by a provincial norm (e.g., when norms matched individuals’ immediate situational circumstances). Analyzing hotel guests’ towel-use during their stay, the current study tests whether messages employing provincial norms were more effective in reducing towel-use than standard environmental messages. In line with previous findings, guests of two hotels used significantly fewer towels when provincial normative appeals—rather than standard environmental messages—were communicated. These findings corroborate to the body of research demonstrating the power of social norms on environmental behavior. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 214 (19 UL)
See detailFear of crime and victimization: A paradox?
Steffgen, Georges UL; Heinz, Andreas UL

Presentation (2014, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 83 (8 UL)
See detailThe police: Are they doing a good job?
Heinz, Andreas UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

Presentation (2014, January)

Detailed reference viewed: 59 (9 UL)
Full Text
See detailGewalthaltige Computerspiele
Happ, Christian UL; Melzer, André UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Porsch, T.; Pieschl, S. (Eds.) Neue Medien und deren Schatten (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 145 (28 UL)
See detailBachelor académique en Psychologie
Steffgen, Georges UL; Melzer, André UL

in Steffgen, Georges; Michaux, Gilles; Ferring, Dieter (Eds.) Psychologie in Luxemburg - Ein Handbuch (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 64 (2 UL)
Full Text
See detailAnger
Steffgen, Georges UL

in Michalos, A. (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 69 (12 UL)
See detailÄrgerbezogene Störungen (Band 55, Fortschritte der Psychotherapie)
Steffgen, Georges UL; de Boer, Claudia; Vögele, Claus UL

Book published by Hogrefe (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 130 (17 UL)
See detailAggression, Ärger und Gesundheit
Steffgen, Georges UL

in Steffgen, Georges; Michaux, Gilles; Ferring, Dieter (Eds.) Psychologie in Luxemburg - Ein Handbuch (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 39 (2 UL)
See detailPsychologie du sport
Steffgen, Georges UL; Touré, Alioune

in Steffgen, Georges; Michaux, Gilles; Ferring, Dieter (Eds.) Psychologie in Luxemburg - Ein Handbuch (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 63 (5 UL)
Full Text
See detailCyberbullying: Missbrauch mittels neuer elektronischer Medien
Steffgen, Georges UL

in Willems, Helmut; Ferring, Dieter (Eds.) Macht und Missbrauch in Institutionen (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 329 (10 UL)
See detailMaster in Psychology: Psychological Intervention
Steffgen, Georges UL

in Steffgen, Georges; Michaux, Gilles; Ferring, Dieter (Eds.) Psychologie in Luxemburg - Ein Handbuch (2014)

Detailed reference viewed: 47 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailLike the Good or Bad Guy—Empathy in antisocial and prosocial games
Happ, Christian UL; Melzer, André UL; Steffgen, Georges UL

in Psychology of Popular Media Culture (2014)

Evidence suggests that violent media influence users’ cognitions, affect, and behavior in a negative way, whereas prosocial media have been shown to increase the probability of prosocial behavior. In the ... [more ▼]

Evidence suggests that violent media influence users’ cognitions, affect, and behavior in a negative way, whereas prosocial media have been shown to increase the probability of prosocial behavior. In the present study, it was tested whether empathy moderates these media effects. In two experiments (N = 80 each), inducing empathy by means of a text (Study 1) or a video clip (Study 2) before playing a video game caused differential effects on cognitions and behavior depending on the nature of the subsequent video game: The induction had positive effects on participants’ behavior (i.e., decreasing antisocial and increasing prosocial behavior) after a prosocial game (Study 1), or when participants played a positive hero character in an antisocial game (Study 2). In contrast, empathy increased antisocial behavior and reduced prosocial behavior after playing a mean character in an antisocial game (Study 1 and 2). These findings call attention to the differential effects of empathy depending on game type and game character, thereby questioning the unconditional positive reputation of empathy in the context of video game research. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 292 (31 UL)
Full Text
See detailRegards sur le sentiment de sécurité des résidents au Luxembourg
de Puydt, Cécile; Reichmann, Liliane; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Cette publication présente les résultats de l’enquête sur la sécurité réalisée courant 2013 au Luxembourg. L’exploitation des résultats est réalisée conjointement par le STATEC et l’Université du ... [more ▼]

Cette publication présente les résultats de l’enquête sur la sécurité réalisée courant 2013 au Luxembourg. L’exploitation des résultats est réalisée conjointement par le STATEC et l’Université du Luxembourg/INSIDE (Integrative Research Unit on Social and Individual Development). L’enquête pose différentes questions concernant la perception par les résidents du niveau de sécurité dans leur voisinage, leurs craintes quant à différents délits, mais également leur satisfaction par rapport au travail de la police et de la justice. Les mesures de précaution comme des alarmes ou des portes sécurisées font également partie des sujets traités. Pour finir, on se penchera sur la proportion d’incidents qui font effectivement l’objet d’une plainte auprès de la police. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 50 (8 UL)
Full Text
See detailRegards sur la sécurité et les délits au Luxembourg
de Puydt, Cécile; Reichmann, Liliane; Heinz, Andreas UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2013)

Cette publication présente les principaux résultats de l’enquête sur la sécurité réalisée courant 2013 au Luxembourg. L’exploitation des résultats est réalisée conjointement par le STATEC et l’Université ... [more ▼]

Cette publication présente les principaux résultats de l’enquête sur la sécurité réalisée courant 2013 au Luxembourg. L’exploitation des résultats est réalisée conjointement par le STATEC et l’Université du Luxembourg/INSIDE (Integrative Research Unit on Social and Individual Development). L’enquête couvre différents types de « délits ». Les délits pris en compte sont les délits dont les résidents de 16 ans ou plus ont été victimes entre 2008 et 2013, mais pouvant avoir eu lieu dans un autre pays. De plus, ces délits reprennent les faits déclarés à la police, mais également tous les délits qui n’ont pas fait l’objet d’une plainte. Les données récoltées permettent ainsi d’apporter un nouveau regard sur les données de la criminalité au Luxembourg. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 56 (7 UL)