References of "Siry, Christina 50003105"
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See detailEnvisioning polysemicity: Generating insights into the complexity of place-based research within contested space
Siry, Christina UL

in Tippins, Deborah J.; Mueller, Michael P.; van Eijck, Michiel (Eds.) et al Cultural studies and environmentalism: The confluence of EcoJustice, place-based (science) education, and indigenous knowledge systems (2010)

In “Implications of sense of place and place-based education for ecological integrity and cultural sustainability in contested places”, Steven Semken and Elizabeth Brandt explore the construct of place ... [more ▼]

In “Implications of sense of place and place-based education for ecological integrity and cultural sustainability in contested places”, Steven Semken and Elizabeth Brandt explore the construct of place, and suggest that place-based education can serve as a mutually advantageous transaction between people and place in contested areas. In this chapter, I extend the implications they have introduced and contend that a critical theoretical perspective is required in work with contested places and displaced peoples in order to recognize the multitude of complexities involved. Building from their work, I suggest using polyvocal and polysemic research in and around contested places as a means to acknowledge multidimensional intersubjective perspectives while also emphasizing connections to place. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 75 (0 UL)
See detailBrothers
Siry, Christina UL; Siry, Liam

in Steinberg, Shirley R.; Kehler, Michael; Cornish, Lindsay (Eds.) Boy culture: An encyclopedia (2010)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (1 UL)
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See detailCreating participatory discourse for teaching and research in early childhood science
Siry, Christina UL; Lang, Diane

in Journal of Science Teacher Education (2010), 21(1), 1-12

This paper presents the results of a study conducted with second grade students and pre-service teachers. This study examined the possibilities for engaging children in critical discourse about their ... [more ▼]

This paper presents the results of a study conducted with second grade students and pre-service teachers. This study examined the possibilities for engaging children in critical discourse about their classroom science experiences. At the heart of this discussion lies the desire to provide a space for teachers and children to develop relationships and to explore the learning of science together. Findings include: (1) on-going, focused, critical dialogue between children and teachers supported children in developing agency in the classroom, and (2) on-going conversations created the opportunity for children to reveal their ways of knowing and developing interpretations of the practice of science. [less ▲]

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See detailExpanding the field of science education: A conversation with Ken Tobin
Siry, Christina UL

in Eurasia Journal of Mathematics, Science & Technology Education (2009), 5(3), 197-208

This paper focuses on a conversation with Dr. Kenneth Tobin, which took place in June 2009 at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), where he is Presidential Professor in the Urban ... [more ▼]

This paper focuses on a conversation with Dr. Kenneth Tobin, which took place in June 2009 at The Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY), where he is Presidential Professor in the Urban Education Program. Our purpose was to focus on Ken’s career in science education, and to discuss the past, present, and future of his research interests. During our conversation, we explored the various trajectories of his career, focusing on the ways in which his research has evolved through the years. Further, Ken shared his thoughts on the field of science education, and provided salient advice for early career scholars. This manuscript includes an introductory summary of Ken’s career achievements to this point, a record of our conversation (the audio-recording can be downloaded at the journal’s website) and a list of selected publications that highlight Ken’s key works. [less ▲]

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See detailConceptual change research and science education practice: A response from educators
Siry, Christina UL; Horowitz, G; Otulaja, F.S. et al

in Cultural Studies of Science Education (2008), 3(2), 451-470

We discuss the eight papers in this issue of Cultural Studies of Science Education focusing on the debate over conceptual change in science education and explore the issues that have emerged for us as we ... [more ▼]

We discuss the eight papers in this issue of Cultural Studies of Science Education focusing on the debate over conceptual change in science education and explore the issues that have emerged for us as we consider how conceptual change research relates to our practice as science educators. In presenting our interpretations of this research, we consider the role of participants in the research process and contextual factors in conducting research on science conceptions, and draw implications for the teaching of science. [less ▲]

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See detailPreparing teachers to serve diverse learners: A PDS / full-service community school model
Ferrara, Joanne; Santiago, Eileen; Siry, Christina UL

in Guadarrama, Irma N.; Ramsey, John M.; Nath, Janice L. (Eds.) University and School Connections: Research Studies in Professional Development Schools (2008)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (2 UL)
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See detailA nutritious field trip
Siry, Christina UL; Famiglietti, Jillian

in Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (2007), 39(3), 175-177

A class trip to the local grocery store is an engaging way to reinforce a unit on nutrition as students make connections between a real-life experience and their classroom learning. Research shows that ... [more ▼]

A class trip to the local grocery store is an engaging way to reinforce a unit on nutrition as students make connections between a real-life experience and their classroom learning. Research shows that students often remember a field trip well into adulthood and even recall specific exhibits and facts.1 and 2 Field trips generally bring to mind a trip to a museum, zoo, or nature center, but a field trip to a grocery store provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate their understanding of nutrition science and food choices. Research has shown that nutrition education programs can effectively improve the dietary behavior of children.3 and 4 Nutrition education in students’ elementary school experiences should focus on lessons that teach about the importance of choosing healthful food. This field trip can be connected to a unit in which students learn about food groups and ultimately work together to create a list of nutritious and healthful meal choices. It has been written for grade 3, but it can be adapted to meet the needs of older students. [less ▲]

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See detailPre-service teachers and classroom teachers learning together: A collaborative teacher education program
Ferrara, J; Siry, Christina UL

in Excelsior: Leadership in Teaching and Learning (2007), 1(2), 39-48

The field-based science methods course described in this paper uses a professional development school to enhance the professional practices of classroom teachers, pre-service teachers, and college faculty ... [more ▼]

The field-based science methods course described in this paper uses a professional development school to enhance the professional practices of classroom teachers, pre-service teachers, and college faculty alike. Participants work together to develop and teach inquiry-based science in a fourth-grade classroom. This article describes how participants are immersed in the teaching and learning of science. [less ▲]

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See detailTeaching with trade books: Wonderful, wiggly worms
Siry, Christina UL

in Science and Children (2006), 43(7), 14-16

The article presents information about teaching worm behavior in a science classroom with the help of books like "Wiggling Worms at Work," by Wendy Pfeffer and "Squirmy Wormy Composters," by Bobbie Kalman ... [more ▼]

The article presents information about teaching worm behavior in a science classroom with the help of books like "Wiggling Worms at Work," by Wendy Pfeffer and "Squirmy Wormy Composters," by Bobbie Kalman and Janine Schaub. While the former book helps students understand the role organisms play in an ecosystem, the latter provides reference materials that can be used by students in designing experiments. With the examination of worms' body structure and behavior, students gain an appreciation of the ecological importance of worms. Experimenting with living creature in the classroom, it is equally important to follow appropriate safety guidelines including washing hands before and after handling worms. One such K-3 grade experiment is to create a worm jar to observe the tunneling behavior of worms. [less ▲]

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See detailA field guide of their own
Siry, Christina UL; Buchinski, Lisa, C.

in Science and Children (2005), 43(1), 36-39

The article presents information on the use of natural outdoor settings to develop and encourage children's appreciation and ownership of their natural environment. Whenever students were outdoors, they ... [more ▼]

The article presents information on the use of natural outdoor settings to develop and encourage children's appreciation and ownership of their natural environment. Whenever students were outdoors, they invariably asked to know the names of what they saw. Rather than simply recite plant and animal names., we pointed out identifiable features in a plant or animal and then taught students to use field guides to find out more. A project was planned for the students to teach the integration of arts and science into other disciplines and there connections to the world around them. Throughout the school year, activities in science focused on developing students' science-process skills, and this particular project focused on the skills of observing and comparing. One hundred twenty five second-and third-grade students participated in the month-long project. This age group was chosen for practical reasons: first, because their schedule went from art to science, or vice versa. This allowed for a block of an hour and a half for each student, rather than the usual 45-minute time period. Second, it was felt that this age group would be developmentally able to make generalizations about habitats and plant requirements while focusing on small differences between species. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 49 (0 UL)