References of "Schwamborn, Jens Christian 50003060"
     in
Bookmark and Share    
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailGeneralising from conventional pipelines using deep learning in high‑throughput screening workfows
Garcia Santa Cruz, Beatriz UL; Sölter, Jan; Gomez Giro, Gemma UL et al

in Scientific Reports (2022)

The study of complex diseases relies on large amounts of data to build models toward precision medicine. Such data acquisition is feasible in the context of high-throughput screening, in which the quality ... [more ▼]

The study of complex diseases relies on large amounts of data to build models toward precision medicine. Such data acquisition is feasible in the context of high-throughput screening, in which the quality of the results relies on the accuracy of the image analysis. Although state-of-the-art solutions for image segmentation employ deep learning approaches, the high cost of manually generating ground truth labels for model training hampers the day-to-day application in experimental laboratories. Alternatively, traditional computer vision-based solutions do not need expensive labels for their implementation. Our work combines both approaches by training a deep learning network using weak training labels automatically generated with conventional computer vision methods. Our network surpasses the conventional segmentation quality by generalising beyond noisy labels, providing a 25% increase of mean intersection over union, and simultaneously reducing the development and inference times. Our solution was embedded into an easy-to-use graphical user interface that allows researchers to assess the predictions and correct potential inaccuracies with minimal human input. To demonstrate the feasibility of training a deep learning solution on a large dataset of noisy labels automatically generated by a conventional pipeline, we compared our solution against the common approach of training a model from a small manually curated dataset by several experts. Our work suggests that humans perform better in context interpretation, such as error assessment, while computers outperform in pixel-by-pixel fne segmentation. Such pipelines are illustrated with a case study on image segmentation for autophagy events. This work aims for better translation of new technologies to real-world settings in microscopy-image analysis. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 193 (18 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPARK7/DJ-1 promotes pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and maintains T(reg) homeostasis during ageing.
Danileviciute, Egle; Zeng, Ni; Capelle, Christophe M. et al

in Nature metabolism (2022), 4(5), 589-607

Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is the gatekeeper enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Here we show that the deglycase DJ-1 (encoded by PARK7, a key familial Parkinson's disease gene) is a pacemaker ... [more ▼]

Pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) is the gatekeeper enzyme of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Here we show that the deglycase DJ-1 (encoded by PARK7, a key familial Parkinson's disease gene) is a pacemaker regulating PDH activity in CD4(+) regulatory T cells (T(reg) cells). DJ-1 binds to PDHE1-β (PDHB), inhibiting phosphorylation of PDHE1-α (PDHA), thus promoting PDH activity and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Park7 (Dj-1) deletion impairs T(reg) survival starting in young mice and reduces T(reg) homeostatic proliferation and cellularity only in aged mice. This leads to increased severity in aged mice during the remission of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Dj-1 deletion also compromises differentiation of inducible T(reg) cells especially in aged mice, and the impairment occurs via regulation of PDHB. These findings provide unforeseen insight into the complicated regulatory machinery of the PDH complex. As T(reg) homeostasis is dysregulated in many complex diseases, the DJ-1-PDHB axis represents a potential target to maintain or re-establish T(reg) homeostasis. [less ▲]

Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailSingle-cell sequencing of human midbrain reveals glial activation and a Parkinson-specific neuronal state.
Smajic, Semra UL; Prada-Medina, Cesar A.; Landoulsi, Zied UL et al

in Brain : a journal of neurology (2022), 145(3), 964-978

Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons, but the exact disease etiology remains largely unknown. To date, Parkinson's disease research has mainly ... [more ▼]

Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons, but the exact disease etiology remains largely unknown. To date, Parkinson's disease research has mainly focused on nigral dopaminergic neurons, although recent studies suggest disease-related changes also in non-neuronal cells and in midbrain regions beyond the substantia nigra. While there is some evidence for glial involvement in Parkinson's disease, the molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to characterize the contribution of all cell types of the midbrain to Parkinson's disease pathology by single-nuclei RNA sequencing and to assess the cell type-specific risk for Parkinson's disease employing the latest genome-wide association study. We profiled >41 000 single-nuclei transcriptomes of postmortem midbrain from six idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients and five age-/sex-matched controls. To validate our findings in a spatial context, we utilized immunolabeling of the same tissues. Moreover, we analyzed Parkinson's disease-associated risk enrichment in genes with cell type-specific expression patterns. We discovered a neuronal cell cluster characterized by CADPS2 overexpression and low TH levels, which was exclusively present in IPD midbrains. Validation analyses in laser-microdissected neurons suggest that this cluster represents dysfunctional dopaminergic neurons. With regard to glial cells, we observed an increase in nigral microglia in Parkinson's disease patients. Moreover, nigral idiopathic Parkinson's disease microglia were more amoeboid, indicating an activated state. We also discovered a reduction in idiopathic Parkinson's disease oligodendrocyte numbers with the remaining cells being characterized by a stress-induced upregulation of S100B. Parkinson's disease risk variants were associated with glia- and neuron-specific gene expression patterns in idiopathic Parkinson's disease cases. Furthermore, astrocytes and microglia presented idiopathic Parkinson's disease-specific cell proliferation and dysregulation of genes related to unfolded protein response and cytokine signaling. While reactive patient astrocytes showed CD44 overexpression, idiopathic Parkinson's disease-microglia revealed a pro-inflammatory trajectory characterized by elevated levels of IL1B, GPNMB, and HSP90AA1. Taken together, we generated the first single-nuclei RNA sequencing dataset from the idiopathic Parkinson's disease midbrain, which highlights a disease-specific neuronal cell cluster as well as 'pan-glial' activation as a central mechanism in the pathology of the movement disorder. This finding warrants further research into inflammatory signaling and immunomodulatory treatments in Parkinson's disease. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 87 (22 UL)
Full Text
See detailAn archaeal compound as a driver of Parkinson’s disease pathogenesis
Trezzi, Jean-Pierre; Aho, Velma UL; Jäger, Christian UL et al

E-print/Working paper (2022)

Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit differences in their gut microbiomes compared to healthy individuals. Although differences have most commonly been described in the abundances of bacterial ... [more ▼]

Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit differences in their gut microbiomes compared to healthy individuals. Although differences have most commonly been described in the abundances of bacterial taxa, changes to viral and archaeal populations have also been observed. Mechanistic links between gut microbes and PD pathogenesis remain elusive but could involve molecules that promote α-synuclein aggregation. Here, we show that 2-hydroxypyridine (2-HP) represents a key molecule for the pathogenesis of PD. We observe significantly elevated 2-HP levels in faecal samples from patients with PD or its prodrome, idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder (iRBD), compared to healthy controls. 2-HP is correlated with the archaeal species Methanobrevibacter smithii and with genes involved in methane metabolism, and it is detectable in isolate cultures of M. smithii. We demonstrate that 2-HP is selectively toxic to transgenic α-synuclein overexpressing yeast and increases α-synuclein aggregation in a yeast model as well as in human induced pluripotent stem cell derived enteric neurons. It also exacerbates PD-related motor symptoms, α-synuclein aggregation, and striatal degeneration when injected intrastriatally in transgenic mice overexpressing human α-synuclein. Our results highlight the effect of an archaeal molecule in relation to the gut-brain axis, which is critical for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of PD. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 81 (5 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe future of Parkinson’s disease research: A new paradigm of human-specific investigation is necessary… and possible
Cassotta, Manuela; Geerts, Hugo; Harbom, Lise et al

in ALTEX: Alternatives to Animal Experimentation (2022)

Detailed reference viewed: 62 (4 UL)
See detailA new brain organoid model to study Parkinson’s Disease
Bolognin, Silvia UL; Smits, Lisa UL; Nickels, Sarah Louise UL et al

in Biomedical Science and Engineering (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 165 (23 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA Triple Combination of Targeting Ligands Increases the Penetration of Nanoparticles across a Blood-Brain Barrier Culture Model
Veszelka, Szilvia; Mészáros, Mária; Porkoláb, Gergő et al

in Pharmaceutics (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 37 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailStructural Plasticity of Dopaminergic Neurons Requires the Activation of the D3R-nAChR Heteromer and the PI3K-ERK1/2/Akt-Induced Expression of c-Fos and p70S6K Signaling Pathway
Mutti, Veronica; Bono, Federica; Tomasoni, Zaira et al

in Molecular Neurobiology (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 29 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailiPSC-Derived Microglia as a Model to Study Inflammation in Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease.
Badanjak, Katja UL; Mulica, Patrycja UL; Smajic, Semra UL et al

in Frontiers in cell and developmental biology (2021), 9

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with unknown cause in the majority of patients, who are therefore considered "idiopathic" (IPD). PD predominantly affects dopaminergic neurons in ... [more ▼]

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with unknown cause in the majority of patients, who are therefore considered "idiopathic" (IPD). PD predominantly affects dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), yet the pathology is not limited to this cell type. Advancing age is considered the main risk factor for the development of IPD and greatly influences the function of microglia, the immune cells of the brain. With increasing age, microglia become dysfunctional and release pro-inflammatory factors into the extracellular space, which promote neuronal cell death. Accordingly, neuroinflammation has also been described as a feature of PD. So far, studies exploring inflammatory pathways in IPD patient samples have primarily focused on blood-derived immune cells or brain sections, but rarely investigated patient microglia in vitro. Accordingly, we decided to explore the contribution of microglia to IPD in a comparative manner using, both, iPSC-derived cultures and postmortem tissue. Our meta-analysis of published RNAseq datasets indicated an upregulation of IL10 and IL1B in nigral tissue from IPD patients. We observed increased expression levels of these cytokines in microglia compared to neurons using our single-cell midbrain atlas. Moreover, IL10 and IL1B were upregulated in IPD compared to control microglia. Next, to validate these findings in vitro, we generated IPD patient microglia from iPSCs using an established differentiation protocol. IPD microglia were more readily primed as indicated by elevated IL1B and IL10 gene expression and higher mRNA and protein levels of NLRP3 after LPS treatment. In addition, IPD microglia had higher phagocytic capacity under basal conditions-a phenotype that was further exacerbated upon stimulation with LPS, suggesting an aberrant microglial function. Our results demonstrate the significance of microglia as the key player in the neuroinflammation process in IPD. While our study highlights the importance of microglia-mediated inflammatory signaling in IPD, further investigations will be needed to explore particular disease mechanisms in these cells. [less ▲]

Detailed reference viewed: 107 (15 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailPINK1 deficiency impairs adult neurogenesis of dopaminergic neurons
Brown, Sarah J; Boussaad, Ibrahim UL; Jarazo, Javier UL et al

in Scientific Reports (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 102 (4 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailMethod Optimization of Skin Biopsy-Derived Fibroblast Culture for Reprogramming Into Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Mommaerts, Kathleen; Bellora, Camille; Lambert, Pauline et al

in Biopreservation and Biobanking (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 65 (0 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailThe Parkinson’s-disease-associated mutation LRRK2-G2019S alters dopaminergic differentiation dynamics via NR2F1
Walter, Jonas; Bolognin, Silvia UL; Poovathingal, Suresh et al

in Cell Reports (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 71 (8 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA robust protocol for the generation of human midbrain organoids
Zagare, Alise UL; Gobin, Matthieu UL; Monzel, Anna et al

in STAR Protocols (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 113 (7 UL)
Full Text
Peer Reviewed
See detailA human stem cell-derived test system for agents modifying neuronal N-methyl-d-aspartate-type glutamate receptor Ca2+-signalling
Klima, Stefanie; Brüll, Markus; Spreng, Anna-Sophie et al

in Archives of Toxicology (2021)

Detailed reference viewed: 33 (0 UL)