References of "Schiltz, Christine 50003015"
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See detailIs the cerebral processing of categorical and coordinate spatial relations based on different or identical but differentially activated functional networks?
Martin, Romain UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

Scientific Conference (2009, September)

The fundamental hypothesis related to the distinction between categorical and coordinate processing has been that these two types of spatial relations coding are qualitatively different. Based on ... [more ▼]

The fundamental hypothesis related to the distinction between categorical and coordinate processing has been that these two types of spatial relations coding are qualitatively different. Based on Kosslyn’s initial hemispheric specialization theory, they also are hypothesized to rely on different functional networks in the brain which are supposed to have evolved in a way to take advantage of more fundamental hemispheric specializations in order to adapt these hemispheric strengths to the processing of the two different types of spatial relations. (...) [less ▲]

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See detailTemporal dynamics of face spatial frequency processing: An fmri masking experiment
Goffaux, Valerie; Peters, Judith; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (2009, May)

When processing a face stimulus, the human visual system tends to strongly integrate its constituent features (eyes, nose, mouth, etc) in a so-called holistic representation. Such feature integration ... [more ▼]

When processing a face stimulus, the human visual system tends to strongly integrate its constituent features (eyes, nose, mouth, etc) in a so-called holistic representation. Such feature integration mainly occurs in face-sensitive regions located in bilateral fusiform gyrii. Behavioural studies showed that feature integration relies on the extraction of low spatial frequencies (LSF) while high SF (HSF) underlie more local aspects of feature analysis. Following coarse-to-fine models of vision, we propose that the LSF-driven feature integration is an early and fast stage of face perception, in contrast to the longer-lasting extraction of detailed feature cues in HSF. By means of an event-related fMRI design, the present study investigated the temporal dynamics of face LSF and HSF processing in the network of face-sensitive cortical regions. Faces were flashed at 75, 150, or 300 msec, followed by a Gaussian mask. They were band-pass filtered to preserve low or high SF. At short stimulus durations, face-sensitive regions located in bilateral fusiform gyrii and superior temporal sulci responded more strongly to LSF than HSF faces. At longer durations, the same regions were more active for HSF than LSF faces. This pattern did not replicate for phase-scrambled versions of the stimuli. Taken together our findings suggest that face perception proceeds following a coarse-to-fine scenario, with an early and fast LSF-driven feature integration being relayed by the slower accumulation of HSF local information. [less ▲]

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See detailFace inversion disrupts the perception of vertical relations between features in the right human occipito-temporal cortex
Goffaux, Valerie; Rossion, Bruno; Sorger, Bettina et al

in Journal of Neuropsychology (2009), 3

The impact of inversion on the extraction of relational and featural face information was investigated in two fMRI experiments. Unlike previous studies, the contribution of horizontal and vertical spatial ... [more ▼]

The impact of inversion on the extraction of relational and featural face information was investigated in two fMRI experiments. Unlike previous studies, the contribution of horizontal and vertical spatial relations were considered separately since they have been shown to be differentially vulnerable to face inversion (Goffaux & Rossion, 2007). Hence, inversion largely affects the perception of vertical relations (e.g. eye or mouth height) while the processing of features (e.g. eye shape and surface) and of horizontal relations (e.g. inter-ocular distance) is affected to a far lesser extent. Participants viewed pairs of faces that differed either at the level of one local feature (i.e. the eyes) or of the spatial relations of this feature with adjacent features. Changes of spatial relations were divided into two conditions, depending on the vertical or horizontal axis of the modifications. These stimulus conditions were presented in separate blocks in the first (block) experiment while they were presented in a random order in the second event-related (ER) experiment. Face-preferring voxels located in the right-lateralized middle fusiform gyrus (rMFG) largely decreased their activity with inversion. Inversion-related decreases were more moderate in left-lateralized middle fusiform gyrus (lMFG). ER experiment revealed that inversion affected rMFG and lMFG activity in distinct stimulus conditions. Whereas inversion affected lMFG processing only in featural condition, inversion selectively affected the processing of vertical relations in rMFG. Correlation analyses further indicated that the inversion effect (IE) observed in rMFG and right inferior occipital gyrus (rIOG) reliably predicted the large behavioural IE observed for the processing of vertical relations. In contrast, lMFG IE correlated with the weak behavioural IE observed for the processing of horizontal relations. Our findings suggest that face configuration is mostly encoded in rMFG, whereas more local aspects of face information, such as features and horizontal spatial relations drive lMFG processing. These findings corroborate the view that the vulnerability of face perception to inversion stems mainly from the disrupted processing of vertical face relations in the right-lateralized network of face-preferring regions (rMFG, rIOG). [less ▲]

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See detailRelations between numerical and visuospatial competencies
Wantz, Marc UL; Reuter, Robert UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

Scientific Conference (2009)

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See detailGender and mathematical competencies!?
Wantz, Marc UL; Brunner, Martin UL; Martin, Romain UL et al

Scientific Conference (2008, September 04)

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See detailThe roles of "face" and "non-face" areas during individual face perception: Evidence by fmri adaptation in a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient
Dricot, Laurence; Sorger, Bettina; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

in NeuroImage (2008), 40(1), 318-332

Two regions in the human occipito-temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces: 'the fusiform face area' ('FFA') and the 'occipital face area' ('OFA'). Whether these areas have a dominant or exclusive ... [more ▼]

Two regions in the human occipito-temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces: 'the fusiform face area' ('FFA') and the 'occipital face area' ('OFA'). Whether these areas have a dominant or exclusive role in face perception, or if sub-maximal responses in other visual areas such as the lateral occipital complex (LOC) are also involved, is currently debated. To shed light on this issue, we tested normal participants and PS, a well-known brain-damaged patient presenting a face-selective perception deficit (prosopagnosia) [Rossion, B., Caldara, R., Seghier, M., Schuller, A. M., Lazeyras, F., Mayer, E. (2003). A network of occipito-temporal face-sensitive areas besides the right middle fusiform gyrus is necessary for normal face processing. Brain 126 2381-2395.], with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Of particular interest, the right hemisphere lesion of the patient PS encompasses the 'OFA' but preserves the 'FFA' and LOC [Sorger, B., Goebel, R., Schiltz, C., Rossion, B. (2007). Understanding the functional neuroanatomy of acquired prosopagnosia. NeuroImage 35, 836-852.]. Using fMRI-adaptation, we found a dissociation between the coding of individual exemplars in the structurally intact 'FFA', which was impaired for faces but preserved for objects in the patient PS's brain. Most importantly, a larger response to different faces than repeated faces was found in the ventral part of the LOC both for normals and the patient, next to the right hemisphere lesion. Thus, following prosopagnosia, areas that do not respond preferentially to faces such as the ventral part of the LOC (vLOC) may still be recruited for compensatory or residual individual face perception. Overall, these observations indicate that several high-level visual areas in the human brain contribute to individual face perception. However, a subset of these areas in the right hemisphere, those responding preferentially to faces ('FFA' and 'OFA'), appear to be critical for this function. [less ▲]

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See detailEvidence for individual face discrimination in non-face selective areas of the visual cortex in acquired prosopagnosia
Dricot, Laurence; Sorger, Bettina; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

in Behavioral Neurology (2008), 19(1-2), 75-79

Two areas in the human occipito-temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces: 'the fusiform face area' ('FFA') and the 'occipital face area' ('OFA'). However, it is unclear whether these areas have an ... [more ▼]

Two areas in the human occipito-temporal cortex respond preferentially to faces: 'the fusiform face area' ('FFA') and the 'occipital face area' ('OFA'). However, it is unclear whether these areas have an exclusive role in processing faces, or if sub-maximal responses in other visual areas such as the lateral occipital complex (LOC) are also involved. To clarify this issue, we tested a brain-damaged patient (PS) presenting a face-selective impairment with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The right hemisphere lesion of the prosopagnosic patient encompasses the 'OFA' but preserves the 'FFA' and LOC. Using fMRI-adaptation, we found a larger response to different faces than repeated faces in the ventral part of the LOC both for normals and the patient, next to her right hemisphere lesion. This observation indicates that following prosopagnosia, areas that do not respond preferentially to faces such as the ventral part of the LOC (vLOC) may still be recruited to subtend residual perception of individual faces. [less ▲]

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See detailGender and mathematical competencies!?
Wantz, Marc UL; Brunner, Martin; Martin, Romain UL et al

Scientific Conference (2008)

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See detailIs there continuity between categorical and coordinate spatial relations coding? Evidence from a grid/no-gridworking memory paradigm
Martin, Romain UL; Houssemand, Claude UL; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

in Neuropsychologia (2008), 46(2), 576-594

We ask the question whether the coding of categorical versus coordinate spatial relations depends on different neural networks showing hemispheric specialization or whether there is continuity between ... [more ▼]

We ask the question whether the coding of categorical versus coordinate spatial relations depends on different neural networks showing hemispheric specialization or whether there is continuity between these two coding types. The `continuous spatial coding' hypothesis would mean that the two coding types rely essentially on the same neural network consisting of more general-purpose processes, such as visuo-spatial attention, but with a different weighting of these general processes depending on exact task requirements. With event-related fMRI, we have studied right-handed male subjects performing a grid/no-grid visuo-spatial working memory task inducing categorical and coordinate spatial relations coding. Our data support the `continuous spatial coding' hypothesis, indicating that, while based on the same fronto-parieto-occipital neural network than categorical spatial relations coding, the coding of coordinate spatial relations relies more heavily on attentional and executive processes, which could induce hemispheric differences similar to those described in the literature. The results also show that visuo-spatial working memory consists of a short-term posterior store with a capacity of up to three elements in the parietal and extrastriate cortices. This store depends on the presence of a visible space categorization and thus can be used for the coding of categorical spatial relations. When no visible space categorization is given or when more than three elements have to be coded, additional attentional and executive processes are recruited, mainly located in the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailFmri evidence for multiple face processing pathways in the human brain
Dricot, Laurence; Schiltz, Christine UL; Sorger, Bettina et al

Poster (2007, May)

Two regions in the occipito-temporal cortex respond more strongly to faces than to objects and are thought to be important for face perception: ‘the fusiform face area’ (‘FFA’) and the ‘occipital face ... [more ▼]

Two regions in the occipito-temporal cortex respond more strongly to faces than to objects and are thought to be important for face perception: ‘the fusiform face area’ (‘FFA’) and the ‘occipital face area’ (‘OFA’). Whether these areas responding preferentially to faces play a dominant or exclusive role in face processing or if sub-maximal responses in other areas of the ventral stream such as the lateral occipital complex (LOC) are also involved is currently debated. To clarify this issue, we tested a brain-damaged patient presenting a face-selective deficit, prosopagnosia, with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Using fMRI-adaptation, we found a dissociation between the coding of identity in the structurally intact ‘FFA’, which was impaired for faces but preserved for objects. This observation complements recent fMRI findings that the ‘FFA’ reflects averaging of heterogeneous highly selective neural populations for faces and objects, by showing here that the responses of these populations can be functionally independent. Most importantly, a larger response to different faces than repeated faces was found in the ventral part of the LOC both for normals and the patient, next to the right hemisphere lesion. Following prosopagnosia, areas that do not respond preferentially to faces such as the ventral part of the LOC (vLOC) may still be recruited to subtend residual individual face discrimination. Overall, these observations indicate that faces are processed through a network of visual areas in the human brain, with a subset of these areas responding preferentially to faces being critical for efficient face recognition. [less ▲]

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See detailThe spatio-temporal correlates of holistic face perception
Schiltz, Christine UL; Jacques, Corentin; Rossion, Bruno

Poster (2007, May)

It is well known that faces are perceived holistically: their parts are integrated into a global or so-called holistic individual representation. Here we clarify where and how early in time individual ... [more ▼]

It is well known that faces are perceived holistically: their parts are integrated into a global or so-called holistic individual representation. Here we clarify where and how early in time individual holistic representations are extracted from the visual stimulus, by means of an event-related identity adaptation paradigm in fMRI (study 1; 10 subjects) and ERPs (study 2; 16 subjects). During blocks, subjects were presented with trials made of two sequentially presented faces and performed a same/different judgement on the top parts of each pair of faces. Face parts were presented either aligned or misaligned. For each face pair, the identity of top and bottom parts could be (a) both identical, (b) both different, (c) different only for the bottom part. The latter manipulation resulted in a strong face composite illusion behaviourally, i.e. the perception of identical top parts as being different, only in the aligned format. In the face-sensitive area of the middle fusiform gyrus (‘fusiform face area’) we observed a stronger response to the top part perceived as being different (release from adaptation), but only when the top and the bottom parts were aligned. It is consistent with the illusion of viewing different top parts of faces, and this release from fMR-adaptation is similar to the one observed in the ‘different’ condition for both aligned and misaligned parts. The same observations were made in ERPs as early as 150 ms, the amplitude of the electrophysiological response at occipito-temporal sites to the second face stimulus being reduced for identical relative to different top face parts, and to identical top parts perceived as different (aligned - bottom different). With both methods, the effects were stronger in the right hemisphere. Altogether, these observations indicate that individual faces are perceived holistically as early as 150 ms in the occipito-temporal cortex. [less ▲]

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See detailInvestigation of featural versus configural processing of faces in the middle fusiform gyrus
Goffaux, Valerie; Sorger, Bettina; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

Poster (2007, May)

Inverting a face affects the processing of the vertical relations between features (e.g. eye height) more than the processing of horizontal relations (e.g. interocular distance) and of local features (e.g ... [more ▼]

Inverting a face affects the processing of the vertical relations between features (e.g. eye height) more than the processing of horizontal relations (e.g. interocular distance) and of local features (e.g. eye shape and surface). Inversion also decreases hemodynamic responses (HR) in face-sensitive regions in the middle fusiform gyrus (MFG), presumably because it reduces face distinctiveness and leads to larger adaptation. Here we tested the hypothesis that inversion affects the perception of vertical metric distances between features in the MFG. In the present fMRI study, twelve subjects were presented with short blocks of upright and inverted pairs composed either of identical faces (‘same’ condition), or of faces that differed at the level of ‘vertical’ relations, ‘horizontal’ relations, the shape of all inner feature (‘different’), or the shape of one single ‘feature’. In rMFG, smaller HR were observed for ‘same’ as compared to ‘different’ condition when faces were presented upright; due to HR adaptation. ‘Vertical’, ‘horizontal’ and ‘featural’ conditions led to HR close to ‘same’ condition. Inversion decreased HR in all conditions except the ‘same’ condition, thus replicating previous findings. The largest inversion-related decrements measured in rMFG were observed for vertical relations. In the left MFG, all conditions led to larger HR than the ‘same’ condition at upright. Inversion decreased HR in vertical and horizontal conditions only. These results suggest different roles of the MFG across hemispheres. rMFG may code ecological face differences, since release from adaptation was only observed for completely different faces in this region. Moreover, rMFG may be sensitive to face configuration as suggested by the generalised inversion-related HR decrease. In contrast, lMFG may code any kind of physical difference between faces irrespective of orientation, except for relational differences. [less ▲]

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See detailUnderstanding the functional neuroanatomy of acquired prosopagnosia
Sorger, Bettina; Goebel, Rainer; Schiltz, Christine UL et al

in NeuroImage (2007), 35(2), 836-852

One of the most remarkable disorders following brain damage is prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces. While a number of cases of prosopagnosia have been described at the behavioral level, the ... [more ▼]

One of the most remarkable disorders following brain damage is prosopagnosia, the inability to recognize faces. While a number of cases of prosopagnosia have been described at the behavioral level, the functional neuroanatomy of this face recognition impairment, and thus the brain regions critically involved in normal face recognition, has never been specified in great detail. Here, we used anatomical and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to present the detailed functional neuroanatomy of a single case of acquired prosopagnosia (PS; Rossion, B., Caldara, R., Seghier, M., Schuller, A.-M., Lazeyras, F., Mayer, E., 2003a. A network of occipito-temporal face-sensitive areas besides the right middle fusiform gyrus is necessary for normal face processing. Brain 126, 2381-95; Rossion, B., Joyce, C.A., Cottrell, G.W., Tarr, M.J., 2003b. Early lateralization and orientation tuning for face, word, and object processing in the visual cortex. Neuroimage 20, 1609-24) with normal object recognition. First, we clarify the exact anatomical location and extent of PS' lesions in relation to (a) retinotopic cortex, (b) face-preferring regions, and (c) other classical visual regions. PS' main lesion - most likely causing her prosopagnosia - is localized in the posterior part of the right ventral occipitotemporal cortex. This lesion causes a left superior paracentral scotoma, as frequently observed in cases of prosopagnosia. While the borders of the early visual areas in the left hemisphere could be delineated well, the extensive posterior right-sided lesion hampered a full specification of the cortical representation of the left visual field. Using multiple scanning runs, face-preferring activation was detected within the right middle fusiform gyrus (MFG) in the so-called 'fusiform face area' ('FFA'), but also in the left inferior occipital gyrus (left 'OFA'), and in the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (STS). The dorsal part of the lateral occipital complex (LOC) and the human middle temporal cortex (hMT+/V5) were localized bilaterally. The color-preferring region V4/V8 was localized only in the left hemisphere. In the right hemisphere, the posterior lesion spared the ventral part of LOC, a region that may be critical for the preserved object recognition abilities of the patient, and the restriction of her deficit to the category of faces. The presumptive functions of both structurally damaged and preserved regions are discussed and new hypotheses regarding the impaired and preserved abilities of the patient during face and non-face object processing are derived. Fine-grained neurofunctional analyses of brain-damaged single cases with isolated recognition deficits may considerably improve our knowledge of the brain regions critically involved in specific visual functions, such as face recognition. [less ▲]

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See detailNumerical competencies of young children
Wantz, Marc UL; Martin, Romain UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

Scientific Conference (2007)

Numerous studies show that wide ranges of competencies in different fields are necessary to develop a good numerical competency. Our research tried to find an answer to the question, which out of various ... [more ▼]

Numerous studies show that wide ranges of competencies in different fields are necessary to develop a good numerical competency. Our research tried to find an answer to the question, which out of various factors mainly influence the numerical competencies of young children. We focused on visuospatial, perceptive and tactile skills as determinants of the quality of early numerical representations. We adopted a longitudinal research design with three periods of data collection (two data collections during the second year of kindergarten and one at the end of first grade). Our test setting for the kindergarten included tests in the three areas mentioned above. The evaluation of these results shows that the numerical competencies are influenced by visuospatial competencies and knowledge of pre-numerical facts. An importance of the perceptive and tactile skills could not be established. At the end of first grade, after formal mathematical instruction, we made a mathematical competency test. A structural equation model of the subtests shows that the numerical knowledge at this stage can be divided in two separate factors: 1. A representational numerical factor (analogical representation of quantities: Triple Code model of Dehaene) 2. A more formal knowledge of mathematics (visual Arabic representation: Triple Code model of Dehaene, 1992). Predicting these two factors from the competency profile measured in kindergarten showed that the representational numerical factor was very well predicted from a general spatio-numerical factor found in the previous year, while the formal knowledge was predicted to a lesser degree by tactile skills measured at the end of kindergarten. Implications for numerical teaching in Kindergarten will be discussed. [less ▲]

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See detailVisuelle Wahrnehmung und arithmetische Kompetenzen
Wantz, Marc UL; Martin, Romain UL; Schiltz, Christine UL

in Motorik (2007), 4

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See detailComputer assisted assessment of visuospatial working memory
Wantz, Marc UL; Martin, Romain UL; Hornung, Caroline UL et al

Poster (2007)

We present a new computer program that allows the assessment of visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in kindergarten children. The challenge for the assessment of VSWM in this age group is to present a test ... [more ▼]

We present a new computer program that allows the assessment of visuospatial working memory (VSWM) in kindergarten children. The challenge for the assessment of VSWM in this age group is to present a test design that is easily understandable for children and thus not too difficult while at the same time implying additional processing elements above the pure storage of positional information (according to the definition of Engle et al. 1999 that working memory combines an element of pure storage with processes of executive attention) The adopted test paradigm is based on a grid / no-grid paradigm for which a previous fMRI study with an adult population has shown that the memorization of positional information in a perceptively undifferentiated space (no-grid condition) requires additional attentional processes compared to the memorization of positional information in a perceptively structured space (grid condition). The setting of the test was adapted to children in Kindergarten. We used a tablet PC to administer the test. This procedure excludes that children fail because they can’t use the computer mouse in an appropriate way. The different items show a 4x4 grid where the eyes of a manikin appear on a dark background. Children are told that the positions of different manikins in a dark room have to be memorized. After a short period of time the eyes disappear again and up to four positions have to be memorized in this way. The test person then clicks in the grid where he believes that the different manikins are hidden. The setting allows measuring performance in terms of accuracy and time. First results with kindergarten children in Luxemburg will be presented showing the correlation of this VSWM task with other visuospatial and numerical tasks. [less ▲]

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See detailFaces are represented holistically in the human occipito-temporal cortex
Schiltz, Christine UL; Rossion, Bruno

in NeuroImage (2006), 32(3), 1385-1394

Two identical top parts of a face photograph look different if their bottom parts differ. This perceptual illusion, the "face composite effect", is taken as strong evidence that faces are processed as a ... [more ▼]

Two identical top parts of a face photograph look different if their bottom parts differ. This perceptual illusion, the "face composite effect", is taken as strong evidence that faces are processed as a whole rather than as a collection of independent features. To test the hypothesis that areas responding preferentially to faces in the human brain represent faces holistically, we recorded functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during an adaptation paradigm with the composite face illusion. In both the middle fusiform gyrus (MFG) and the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG), we observed a significantly larger response to the same top face when it was aligned with different bottom parts than with the same bottom part, with a most robust effect in the right middle fusiform gyrus. This difference was not found when the top and the bottom face parts were spatially misaligned or when the faces were presented upside-down. These findings indicate that facial features are integrated into holistic face representations in areas of the human visual cortex responding preferentially to faces. [less ▲]

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See detailPreserved individual face discrimination in the ventral lateral occipital complex (vloc) of a brain-damaged prosopagnosic patient
Dricot, L; Schiltz, Christine UL; Sorger, B et al

Scientific Conference (2006, June 17)

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See detailImpaired face discrimination in acquired prosopagnosia is associated with abnormal response to individual faces in the right middle fusiform gyrus
Schiltz, Christine UL; Sorger, Bettina; Caldara, Roberto et al

in Cerebral Cortex (2006), 16(4), 574-586

The middle fusiform gyrus (MFG) and the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG) are activated by both detection and identification of faces. Paradoxically, patients with acquired prosopagnosia following lesions to ... [more ▼]

The middle fusiform gyrus (MFG) and the inferior occipital gyrus (IOG) are activated by both detection and identification of faces. Paradoxically, patients with acquired prosopagnosia following lesions to either of these regions in the right hemisphere cannot identify faces, but can still detect faces. Here we acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data during face processing in a patient presenting a specific deficit in individual face recognition, following lesions encompassing the right IOG. Using an adaptation paradigm we show that the fMRI signal in the rMFG of the patient, while being larger in response to faces as compared to objects, does not differ between conditions presenting identical and distinct faces, in contrast to the larger response to distinct faces observed in controls. These results suggest that individual discrimination of faces critically depends on the integrity of both the rMFG and the rIOG, which may interact through re-entrant cortical connections in the normal brain. [less ▲]

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